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Collecting the Wisdom of Chögyam Trungpa

March 14, 2011

The 24th anniversary of Chögyam Trungpa’s parinirvana (death) is April 5th, and in honor of the occasion Shambhala Publications is giving away a set of the eight-volume Collected Works of Chögyam Trungpa.

We are celebrating the growth of Ocean of Dharma Quotes of the Week, which began nine years ago in April 2003, with 108 subscribers. Now almost 11,000 people receive the quotes each week. We are also celebrating the wisdom of Chögyam Trungpa, whose name means Ocean of Dharma, and whose words are a vast ocean of wisdom.

To enter this contest, please post a comment below telling us your favorite book, article, or saying by Chögyam Trungpa and why you like it. The winner will be chosen by random draw at 3PM EST on Monday, April 4. Congrats to Kris T.! He's won the eight-volume set of the Collected Works of Chögyam Trungpa. Thank you for your thoughtful comments, everyone! Please stay tuned for more contests.


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515 Responses to Collecting the Wisdom of Chögyam Trungpa

  • John Miedema says:

    I enjoyed "Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior." I very much liked Trungpa’s description of meditation as "developing a sense of our spot, our place on this earth", a kind of psychological or inner homesteading that helps us be at peace.

    I wrote a short review of it.

    http://johnmiedema.ca/2009/06/21/inner-homesteading-shambhala-by-chogyam-trungpa-book-review/

    Please enter me in the draw!

    Posted on March 14, 2011 at 9:49 am

  • Rev. Danny Fisher says:

    "The bad news is you’re falling through the air, nothing to hang on to, no parachute. The good news is there’s no ground." - Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche

    This my favorite of the Vidyadhara's quotes because, for me, it perfectly captures the directness and the optimism of the Buddhist path.

    Posted on March 15, 2011 at 9:42 am

  • John Miedema says:

    I enjoyed “Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior.” I very much liked Trungpa’s description of meditation as “developing a sense of our spot, our place on this earth”, a kind of psychological or inner homesteading that helps us be at peace.

    Posted on March 15, 2011 at 11:00 am

  • Wake up Boston! » Blog Archive » The Artful Quality of Tantra says:

    [...] Of Interest to Readers: On April 4th, we are giving away a set of the eight-volume Collected Works of Chögyam Trungpa to celebrate Chögyam Trungpa and reaching 10,000 subscribers to Ocean of Dharma. To enter, leave a comment on the editor’s blog. [...]

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 2:02 am

  • Jon Griffith says:

    I loved today's quote. Understanding how I con myself and others is a never-ending process and it does require a person to be fantastically precise. Thanks Ocean of Dharma for the great quotes!

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 3:08 am

  • Juno Gemes says:

    Chogyyam trumpa was my friend at Sami Ling in the mid 1960's. That was my good fortune. At present I am reading Smile at Fear - I learn so much from reflection on his teaching. I'm pleased to enter your draw - good luck all.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 3:09 am

  • Jenny says:

    I often don't understand the Oceans of Dharma quotes when I read them. I find that later I begin to get a glimpse.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 3:11 am

  • Mark Wilensky says:

    Chogyam Trungpa's entire teaching about warriorship gets to the heart of what it means to confront reality. Wouldn't it be transforming if military leaders were given this knowledge?

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 3:12 am

  • Gabi says:

    It is difficult to pick but at this moment one of the quotes that resonates most deeply with me is ...

    "We must be willing to be completely ordinary people, which means accepting ourselves as we are without trying to become greater, purer, more spiritual, more insightful. If we can accept our imperfections as they are, quite ordinarily, then we can use them as part of the path. But if we try to get rid of our imperfections, then they will be enemies, obstacles on the road to our ‘self-improvement’."

    I have to constantly remind myself of this, both in how I approach my practice and in how I approach my relationship to myself and others. It reminds me that meditation is not a way to elevate myself but rather to accept my basic goodness and by extension the basic goodness, the wonderful ordinariness, of us all. When I read this quote I feel what I often feel when I read Chögyam Trungpa's work - a completely unique mix of relief that I am ok and a frightened awareness that I can no longer just turn away.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 3:12 am

  • Rose Kinder says:

    I enjoyed “Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior” which my meditation group used as a guide for learning outside of our meditation practice. It was helpful in portraying our path as one that often is challenging.

    I would greatly enjoy having an 8 volume set of collected works by Chögyam Trungpa.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 3:13 am

  • Phyllis Utigard says:

    I appreciate the last chapter of "Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior" -- a great summary.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 3:14 am

  • kathleen hudson says:

    Studied at naropa with ginsberg and discovered shambahla warrior! Being a warrior of the gentle sensitive heart has always called me! Understood my tears after reading.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 3:23 am

  • Alenka says:

    My favourite book by Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche is Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism because it was so precise, even shocking at times but even to a person like me, who knew nothing about Buddhism, it was very possible to feel the love and respect for the reader, therefore not trying to lure her into Buddhism with honey coated words and promises of a happy end. As much as this path wasn't the quick fix I dreamed of, the approach of complete honesty and directness was the best gift I could have gotten out of a book.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 3:23 am

  • kathleen hudson says:

    Studied at naropa with ginsberg and discovered shambhala warrior! Being a warrior of the gentle sensitive heart has always called me! Understood my tears after reading.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 3:26 am

  • Berna Wang says:

    There are so many sentences, parragraphs of CTR's teachings so inspiring! But my favorite work or his is "The path is the goal", because that was the first book on meditation and Buddhism my son ever read when he was 20 and became interested in Dharma. Two days after I lend it to him he gave it back to me. I asked him 'have you already read it?!' and his answer was 'oh, no. I've just bought another copy so I'm not damaging yours —there are so many interesting parts I want to underline'. He's beeb a Dharma practitioner since then and he himself has given this book as a gift to many of his friends. That's why this book is so special for me :)

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 3:27 am

  • Monique Tirion says:

    I am in awe of all of Chogyam's Rinpoche's writing. I am blown away by the relevance of the latest book, Work Sex Money; these words might have been said today. Each time I reach for one of Chogyam Rinpoche's book, a new challenge falls to me as I so clearly recognize the barriers described. I am totally grateful to all the editors and organizations that continue to bring these words of sanity to us, thanks you so so much!!

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 3:29 am

  • Ania says:

    "Any perception can connect us to reality, properly and fully. What we see doesn't have to be pretty, particularly; we can appreciate anything that exists. There is some principle of magic in everything, some living quality. Something living, something real, is taking place in everything."

    This quote on the art of perception is white tantra in its very essence. The teachings are my inspiration. Thank you. Blessings, Ania

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 3:34 am

  • Robin Crane says:

    "Suffering is the manure for the field of wisdom".

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 3:36 am

  • Richard Heilbrunn says:

    My appetite for Chogyam Trungpa is insatiable. I look forward to Ocean of Dharma every week. My favorite book is Shambhala Sacred Path of the Warrior as it begins us on our journey towards enlightened society. I am currently reading Work, Sex, Money and find it essential companion in contemporary life.

    Richard

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 3:40 am

  • Benedict says:

    Love the site. These dharma chunks have been great sustenance for 6 months or more ,and now with the confidence I have been encouraged to seek out richer fare in evening dharma study at my local Triratna centre.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 3:42 am

  • Thais Luchi says:

    "Without others and the challenges they present, we would have no chance at all to develop beyond ego. So the idea here is to feel grateful that others are presenting us with tremendous obstacles. Without them, we could not follow the path at all." in TRAINING THE MIND
    Everytime something disturbs me in relationships I have to remember this!

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 3:42 am

  • Eva Correale says:

    There are so many, but I would have to say my favorite book, and the one I read over and over again is "The Path is the Goal". It was the first book my teacher gave me to read for instruction and understanding of Buddhist Meditation. I believe my favorite line from the book is when he is explaining what peace means in reference to the practice of shamatha. " But in this case when we talk about peace we mean that for the first time we are able to see ourselves completely, perfectly, beautifully as we are, absolutely as we are." This "hooked" me.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 3:50 am

  • Mary Bass says:

    “Too often, people think that solving the world's problems is based on conquering the earth, rather than touching the earth, touching ground.”

    so true and so simple

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 3:50 am

  • Kerry says:

    I am a recent practitioner of Buddhism and have been steeping myself within many of the great works of Shambhala from the comprehensive texts of "The Words of My Perfect Teacher", the pure poetry of "The Rain of Wisdom" to Shantideva's living classic "The Way of the Bodhisattva." However, it was through Chogyam Trungpa's fearless openness in speaking through the Western mind in "The Myth of Freedom" that has truly helped cleansing the path before me.
    Thank you for the finest guides

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 4:05 am

  • Jenn MacCormack says:

    I have found Trungpa's teachings on spiritual materialism and crazy wisdom real insight towards embodiment. But so many of his work is excellent, in the dharmic and popular sense. Thank you, Carolyn Gimian.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 4:07 am

  • Dave Lindberg says:

    Thanks for sharing the teachings and for the opportunity to dive deeper into this wisdom. As I travel the path, the world opens ever wider.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 4:09 am

  • Frans Schuring says:

    "What's the problem, sweetheart?"
    Sometimes when I'm caught up in something this question pops up in my mind. As if I hear him say it, in his particular tone of voice, with a bright smile.
    And yes, whatever seemed to be the problem has then completely turned upside down.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 4:12 am

  • Tharpa Pema says:

    I recently took refuge vows in the Shambhala lineage. I had to travel two hours from my hometown to connect in person with other Shambhalians. It was wonderful!

    After two and 1/2 years of reading and studying the work of Pema Chodron and Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche, I must say these teachings have transformed my life.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 4:14 am

  • Sharon Danukos says:

    I am deeply moved through one of His students Pema Chedron who is head of a monestary in Nova Scotia. She is incredibly clear and fresh. Thus giving great honor to her teacher Chogyam Trungpa. I would dearly love to have the book set, and it would be well used loved, and entually passed on . Thanks. Sharon D
    "When you are in the middle of a situation, you automatically pick up what is needed... You just do it-and you find yourself doing it!"

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 4:16 am

  • Jim Santi Owen says:

    As a musician, today's quote was one of my all-time favorites: ‎"Tantra, the ultimate teaching of Buddhism, is fantastically precise and pure. There is a pronounced artful quality. Tantric practitioners are good artists, who paint good pictures that do not try to con one. Tantric practitioners are good musicians, who do not fool around banging away at random, but play precisely, musically."

    Thanks so much for sharing the legacy of Rinpoche's wisdom.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 4:23 am

  • Dianne DeMarco says:

    " You cannot own the power and the magic in this world. It is always available, but it does not belong to anyone." - The Path Of The Sacred Warrior

    I am at the beginning and in reading about the energy of drala, a most auspicious way of being in the world was opened up to me. I thank the spirit of Chogyam Trungpa for detailig this path in his writings. As I suspected for the open and sincere of heart, we come to it from different paths but are one in the same. Love and Blessings to all.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 4:32 am

  • Lee Miller says:

    I have never read any of his books. I am a new subscriber to this newsletter and I am enjoying it very much. The comments left by others have inspired me to read Chögyam Trungpa’s books I believe that I would find much to enjoy from them.

    Thank you for the work that you do to allow others to find a path.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 4:33 am

  • Deb Valenti says:

    "Not knowing the nature of fear, you can't go beyond it. But once you know your cowardice, once you know where the stumbling block is, you just have to climb over it... maybe just 3 and a half steps".

    Chogyam Trungpa's ability to find humor in the midsts of struggle is his most profound teaching. I am so grateful for his wisdom.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 4:39 am

  • Hakim says:

    I believe obtaining a volume of Chogyam's experiences would be beneficial to me and ultimately others.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 4:47 am

  • Renee D'Aoust says:

    Let's celebrate authentic compassion rather than idiot compassion. No more door mats for the sake of the narcissistic other.

    Thanks for all the publications.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 4:48 am

  • George Cleveland says:

    With Chogyam Trungpa, it IS an ocean of dharma. The thoughts and words rise and fall. What did not speak to me one day rises to a magnificent crest the next. Never ending.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 4:57 am

  • Gin B says:

    I always look forward to opening my Oceans of Dharma message. I can never anticipate where it may take me and it is always a place worth visiting.
    Often I connect while commuting via train and getting the spiritual message insuch a mundane setting is always ennervating.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 5:03 am

  • Thomas Y says:

    Shambala - Sacred Path of the Warrior has been a book I have read and re-read over the course of the past 20 years. When I have felt without the precision and gentleness to temper the strength, power and energy in my heart, I have turned to Shambala for focus. It shows a clear, simple and direct way to utilize the energy of anger, sadness and defeat. Working with the ideas in Shambala has allowed me to glimpse the exquisite beauty in being truly human, a seemingly simple though difficult task for me. Give thanks and praise. Onelove.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 5:04 am

  • Barry Gruessner says:

    "No fundamental complaint." - DDM

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 5:06 am

  • Carole says:

    Ocean of Dharma's arrival is always welcome. A
    gentle, or not so gentle, reminder of how my thoughts free or confine me.
    One image that recently appeared, "nobody polishes
    the sun" has continued to resonate. It makes me
    smile, thank you.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 5:16 am

  • Steven C. Hollfield says:

    "Yes, he really, really, really did fly!"

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 5:20 am

  • Jamie Jewett says:

    eh ma ho!

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 5:26 am

  • Kerri says:

    Although I have subscribed to Shambhala for some time I am still new to this and would love to read these books to learn more.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 5:28 am

  • Elizabeth Reid says:

    "All your polarities are equally valid, whether weakness or strength. There’s no point in splitting your basic being into several parts and trying to suppress certain parts and cultivate others." As often happens in a quite magical and timely fashion, this quote came through on the day of a Fearlessness in Everyday Life class that I am involved in teaching in NYC. It was offered to the students to support the principles being presented - a perfect fit!
    Much gratitude for the endless inspiration and magic of these teachings.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 5:29 am

  • Christine de Jong says:

    Chogyam Trungpa is one of many wonderful teachers I am so happy to have met on my life's journey.
    He has taught me about embryonic sadness and that it is a key point.And to make the practice of meditation my source of strength.
    And that I can survive beautifully by doing nothing.
    I am forever grateful to him.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 5:31 am

  • Neal says:

    Thank you for your daily quotes....I appreciate them and the quiet wisdom within!

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 5:36 am

  • Sokai Geoffrey Barratt says:

    Though I have followed a different tradition( zen ) , I have always felt that Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche has been my wise older brother guiding me in this dharma study and play . My favorite comment is " A Bodhisattva can step outside of the tradition because he knows it so well. " ; this one quote has helped me
    understand the form of spiritual practice without being caught by it. .

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 5:46 am

  • Pat Gideon says:

    I greatly appreciate every message I receive from Ocean of Dharma and the writings of Chogyam Trungpa are ever a wonderful guide for me. Thank you for this celebration of a great man and a superb teacher!

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 5:46 am

  • Deborah H says:

    "Meditation in Action" was well beyond my understanding (my first Dharma book)but I recognized the Truth in it, and read it over and over through the years. Thank you Rinpoche!

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 5:55 am

  • tongnyid llamo says:

    "The only way to relax with yourself is to open your heart. Then you have a chance to see who you are. This experience is like opening a parachute. When you jump out of an airplane and open the chute, you are there in the sky by yourself. Sometimes it is very frightening, but on the other hand, when you take this step, the whole situation, the whole journey, makes sense. You have to actually do it, and then you will understand."

    (From "Facing Yourself," in SMILE AT FEAR)

    I especially like this reminder to relax with ourselves through Heart-Action. I take this commentary as encouragement to apply the spirit of Bodhicitta towards my own sentient beingness...in addition to demonstrating this intention towards others. With the instruction to "ACTUALLY DO IT" Trungpa underlines the point that my desire to *blend* the dharma w/my mindstream will not bear fruit if I am not supporting my study and positive intentions with mindful ACTION... In order to develop complete understanding of the path and work towards the ultimate goal ~to go beyond samsara myself and provide relief to all sentient beings who suffer~ I must proceed by Actively Living an Experience of these concepts...

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 6:07 am

  • rita barnadas says:

    "You are alone and are creating the whole game by yourself." From Glimpses of Abidharma.As I age the aloneness of our condition becomes ever more apparent. The attachments slip away like leaves on a tree in autumn. But I am less frightened now, more embracing of the solitude, deeply grateful to Trungpa for his guidance on the path..."...the noise of the birds becomes merely audible silence." From Meditation in Action," the small dog-eared copy which lives in my purse, buried treasure. And every page of "Crazy Wisdom."

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 6:08 am

  • Michele S says:

    My favorite quote is: "Realizing that you don't need any fresh, new, extraordinary things to entertain you, you can be there on the spot and celebrate what you have. You don't need new objects of appreciation. To witness and experience what you have is good enough. In fact, it's wonderful. It's already a handful, so you don't need anything extra. When you are not searching for a substitute or a better alternative to what you have, you feel quite satisfied. Satisfaction is appreciating ourselves and what we have already, naturally speaking. It is respecting the sacredness and the beauty of the world."
    This quote is helpful in practicing contentment, no extra and happy in the moment. Precious words from a precious teacher. E ma ho!

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 6:17 am

  • Gilberto Castaneda says:

    Peace be with you.

    Please consider me for the draw.

    Cheers from Mexico.

    Gilberto

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 6:25 am

  • Mark Curtin says:

    I recently completed reading Dragon Thunder to gain a more accurate understanding of Chogyam Trungpa -- which I did. It was as gripping as any fiction novel I have ever read. Thank you for all you fine work Carolyn!

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 6:29 am

  • Erika Mitchener says:

    "The warrior is not afraid of space"

    The spaciousness arising from my meditation experiences have not always been so calming. At first I. Felt really groundless and stunned by the shift. Learning to relax into the spaciousness by applying fearlessness transforms my world. It makes me a better person so I can in turn be a better person for all those around me.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 6:29 am

  • Linda Palmason says:

    "Meditation is the key to seeing yourself as well as to seeing beyond yourself."
    I wander; I become distracted; I get frustrated; I feel like I am going nowhere...and then I get called back to meditation...thank you Rinpoche.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 6:31 am

  • Leslie E says:

    This is such a great question because it causes us to remember what an incredibly prolific (and quotable) writer Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche was. The book I return to the most often is Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior. This text really encapsulates the core Shambhala teachings and concepts, always providing a guide to continue practicing and a compass of compassion!

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 6:34 am

  • Linda Sawatzky says:

    “Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior” is a book I read in preparation for a weekend online retreat last October with Pema Chodron entitled "Smile at Fear: Finding a True Heart of Bravery." Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche is Pema's beloved teacher and I too would like to continue to learn from his teachings.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 6:35 am

  • Justin J Engle says:

    "No one can save us from the state of chaos or samsara unless we understand the meaning of chaos and confusion, unless we have experienced it and suffered from it. Otherwise, although we may be in the midst of chaos, we don't notice it. You don't begin to notice chaos until you are already on the path. Then you begin to feel uncomfortable. You feel that something is a nuisance. Something's bugging you constantly. You realize the chaos when you are already making the journey."

    This is one of the first quotes that helped to show me that I was traveling on a path that felt significant to me.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 6:36 am

  • PETER B.JONES says:

    When the doctors told me there was no cure for my chronic pain following surgery to my neck and back. I started looking outside the box, the circle,the economy, and Shambhala found me, The Sacred Path of the Warriorship. Trungpa said, "In life if you get lucky, you get sick" What he ment by that was, you get off the train you've been riding and leave all that baggage behind and start from zero.
    I've tried synthesing my thoughts,emotions,patterns of where my energy is going. This is succintly what manifested.
    "The New Rays of Dawn and the Nature of Things
    6.46am."


    I know where I came from
    I know who I am
    I know where I'm going
    No Gods,No Reigions, No Politics,
    No Economy
    Just my Breath:- Earth,Wind,Water and Fire

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 6:36 am

  • Judy Roush says:

    "...Having been shaken, they begin to question: 'Who am I? What am I? What is happening?' Then they go further and realize that there is something in them that is asking these questions, something, that is, in fact, intelligent and not exactly confused."

    I love this. It is my experience; it is my simple solution.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 6:49 am

  • Grace says:

    I wish you could leave some space after the quote
    on the weekly email. Running right into the 'blurb'
    seems disrespectful in print. Otherwise, do like the new format; and of course the awakened quality
    of the content.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 6:50 am

  • jr says:

    I like when he said he'd been listening to rock n roll thinking he'd been missing something and it turned out he hadn't.

    cheers from ct. go huskies

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 6:52 am

  • John Eberly says:

    "Things get very clear when you're cornered."


    That is a favorite quote, but there are so many, you cannot open any of his books without immediately finding something to ponder deeply.

    The first collection I came across which remains one that I go back to again and again: JOURNEY WITHOUT A GOAL.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 6:58 am

  • Christopher says:

    I read Chogyam Trungpa's 'Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism' about a year ago and it impressed upon me the importance of motivation when engaging in my practice. I can't say I always sit down to practice with the most exemplary motivation yet this text helped me to gain perspective on that and a little more insight on precious human birth.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 6:59 am

  • PETER B.JONES says:

    Please enter my comment I would be honoured to be able to read all that Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche left us with.

    Peter B.Jones

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 7:08 am

  • Thomas Lipsett says:

    The image of my old friend Allen Ginsberg helping Trungpa up the aisle to speak at UC Berkeley in the lae 60's helped bridge the gap between beatnik and vedanta. That evening culminated for me many yars later with the publication of my novel SISKIYOU RACER.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 7:27 am

  • Maryanne deGoede says:

    "Thoughts vanish like an imprint of a bird in the sky."

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 7:40 am

  • Zea Mays says:

    At Trungpa Rinpoche's talk BECOMING ONE'S OWN LAWYER in Vancouver, B.C. on Sept 28, 1979 I heard him say that we have been educated to defend ourselves, pulling logic out of nowhere to justify ourselves.

    He said to begin by looking inward and trusting oneself, not defending oneself. There is some willingness to be patient and decent in us. We can cultivate this basic gentleness, this beginning purity and goodness. We are capable of tender extensions of our self - its real.

    Taming the mind is the heart and purpose of the practice of meditation. Its the opposite of ego building which is equivalent to 'rightness all the time'."

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 7:44 am

  • Zea Mays says:

    further from the same lecture in Vancouver: "Doubt is wondering if there's anyway to sneak out the back door. Resentment is the pain of being cornered and wanting to get out."

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 7:56 am

  • Stuart Bonnington says:

    I loved the quote about being careful to try not to disown polarities. I am taking that to heart. Blessings to all .
    Stuart

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 8:08 am

  • Patty DiIenno says:

    "The problem is that ego can convert anything to its own use," he said, "even spirituality." Reminds me to be ever vigilant of the insidious nature of the ego.
    Namaste~

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 8:28 am

  • william larsen says:

    My favorite works by Chogyam Trungpa are "CUTTING THROUGH SPIRITUAL MATERIALISM" and "THE MYTH OF FREEDOM. These books have been an invaluable aid in my progress on the spiritual path because they provided deep insight into the VIEW of the path, and cut through so many of the dualistic notions confusing my practice at the time I discovered them.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 8:33 am

  • Gena Galenski says:

    This quote (below) stood out for me and I used as an email signature for months. I feel 'faith' is moving into the unknown and it often takes a reframing of a situation - shifting one's mind-set to experience either joy or a challenge, or even pain as 'the journey' or 'the discovery' - life is unchartered and if we think it is chartered, we are often presented with 'a bump in the road,' or circumstances which require courage, determination and a positive mind-set to move forward. This quote gives me peace and affirms who I feel I already am - to stand strong in my center-my 'self' or return there over and over again (!) strive to proceed with self and other com/passion.

    Faith is based on genuineness, trusting in yourself and your vision. Faith inspires discipline, which is not based on punishment or arbitrary rules and authority, but rather on becoming thoroughly gentle and genuine. Discipline guides you and shows you how to live in the warrior’s world. With this unwavering discipline, the warrior takes joy in the journey and joy in working with others. This joy is like music, which celebrates its own rhythm and melody. The celebration is continuous, in spite of the ups and downs of life. Adapted from Slogan 20 in Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior Book and Card Set: 53 Principles for Living Life with Fearlessness and Gentleness. Available at: http://www.shambhala.com/html/catalog/items/isbn/978-1-59030-177-7.cfm

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 8:38 am

  • Margaretta Sander says:

    THE WHEEL OF FAITH

    The Buddhist approach to faith is that you help yourself rather than being helped by something outside yourself. You learn that you can help yourself, completely, and you have faith in your ability to do so. Buddhism is not particularly a centalized philosophy, which would be symbolized by a pyramid. Rather, one of the main symbols for Buddhism is a wheel. It is a circular approach rather than a pyramid approach. Your effort is recirculated. What you put out in a situation goes out and around and it comes back to you. Faith here is the solid ground of real appreciation of things as they are: that fire burns, that water flows. It is based on a real experience of how things work.

    Condensed from "The Charnel Ground," in THE SADHANA OF MAHAMUDRA sourcebook, page 73.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 8:47 am

  • Sara Stewart says:

    Tantra- the union of masculine & femine. A teaching so needed in this world at this time.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 8:50 am

  • Paul says:

    The blog upgrade looks great. Thanks for doing it. I hope I win the books!

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 8:52 am

  • Nicole says:

    Hi,
    I am enjoying Ocean of Dharma; Quotes of the Week: The Everyday Wisdom of Chogyam Trungpa. Keep up the good work. It is a venerable feast!
    And please consider me for the draw.
    Thanks again.
    Nicole
    ( :

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 8:58 am

  • Gordon Wilson says:

    I have really liked all of the Chogyam Trungpa writings that I have come across, but one of my most favorite books of his is "First Thought, Best Thought" 108 poems. As an aspiring poet, these poems are beautiful in themselves, but also have the ability to teach about poetry, such as the title of the collection, "First thought, Best thought"

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 9:07 am

  • Joyce Brooks says:

    Thank you for your gift of wisdom. I read “Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior" and "Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism" during a period of my life when I so needed them and was searching for answers. My heart opened up to receive those words and it changed my life.
    Please enter me in your drawing. These books are a treasurer I would gladly receive. Blessings to you always!

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 9:19 am

  • Deborah Luscomb says:

    "Since all things are naked, clear, and free from obscurations, there is nothing to attain or realise.
    The everyday practice is simply to develop a complete openness to all situations and emotions.
    And to all people - experiencing everything totally without reservations and blockages, so that one never withdraws or centralises onto oneself."

    ... says it all... view, meditation, and conduct!

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 9:32 am

  • amy babb says:

    "Chaos should be regarded as extremely good news!"
    Don't know if the exclamation sign was origonally there, but that is how I always say it. :)

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 9:32 am

  • Debra Gilliss says:

    I just finished reading "Born in Tibet". It is quite amazing to me what he went through to get here and share these teachings with us. I have had some trouble with his metaphors in other writings but this book brought me much closer to him. I am now reading V2 of the Collected works and am enjoying some of the shorter transcripts of the talks he gave in the 70s. Also love Cutting through spiritual materialism and Smile at Fear.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 9:45 am

  • Bonnie Bick says:

    At all times the positive change that was introduced in my life through contact with Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche is with me...it is the core of my
    being. I am thankful ... I remain a grateful student of his work and wisdom.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 9:46 am

  • Benjamin says:

    "Right effort is seeing a situation precisely as it is at that very moment, being fully present, with delight, with a grin."

    I like this because it is true, honest.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 9:51 am

  • Howard Harawitz says:

    Love the Ocean of Dharma Quotes of the Week. Keep 'em coming. Cheers -- Howard

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 9:54 am

  • Barb Cortland says:

    One of my favorite books is Smile at Fear. Twenty eight years ago I went on a search to help myself get fear in perspective. I explored different therapies, different spiritual paths and grew in my relationship to fear. When Pema Chodron and Carolyn offered the weekend on this book I felt like it was given especially for me. The path of Shambhala speaks to the challenges that I have faced with fear through the years in a way that I feel so blessed to be shown. Thank you to all who have kept making these teachings available!!! Barb Cortland

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 10:06 am

  • Chhi'med Drolma says:

    My favorite Chogyam Trungpa book is the recent Fear book, fear being an issue I struggle with. What I like best about this book and all of Chogyam Trungpa's books is that it always feels so warm, as if it were personally written for me, spoken kindly by someone who holds me in compassion, no matter what I struggle with. I'm always so thankful to read Chogyam Trungpa's books.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 10:08 am

  • Dan says:

    I always enjoy getting Ocean of Dharma every week. It's a breath of fresh air.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 10:15 am

  • Zuleyha says:

    The Ocean of Dharma quotes are the highlight of my inbox.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 10:31 am

  • Buck Clarke says:

    It is so difficult to pick just one thing Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche said as a favorite. The one that is most in the forefront for me today is: "When you do not say what you feel, you generate confusion for yourself and confusion for others."
    Peace to all.
    Buck Clarke.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 10:50 am

  • Patrick Connell says:

    "Look. This is your world! You can't not look".
    I am a photographer/visual artist and I live by this quotation. Simple wisdom, wow, do we need more of that now.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 11:07 am

  • Jody Berger says:

    Thank you for sending the quotes. I get a lot out of them.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 11:09 am

  • Gail Whitacre says:

    "I think the basis is non-aggression. If we are able to control our own aggression, then we can help others to do the same thing. You don't have to be speedy and aggressive in order to keep up with the world. But, you have to learn to settle down and regard wherever you are as the best seat you could have. So you have to learn how to join heaven and earth together, so to speak."

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 11:24 am

  • Paul J. Amell says:

    I have been a subscriber of Ocean of Dharma quotes for, at least, well over one year. I look forward to reading the individual quotes of the week, because in many cases, they end up being auspicious, the right dharma, at the right time. The most recent auspicious quote was on March 16th, 2011: "ALL YOUR POLARITIES ARE VALID."
    I have been a practitioner, in the Shambhala lineage for just over 2 1/2 years. I am strengthened, due to my practice. Speaking only for myself, I was tremendously hard on myself, before I ever knew of practice. With practice, I am learning to end the suffering within myself, and by extension ending the suffering of others. Some days are harder than others, and it was a difficult day March 16th. Reading the quote for that day was most encouraging. "Cho," being the tibetan word for dharma, "cho" meaning, "to heal"......March 16th quote was healing for me. Thank you.
    One book that rings true for me right now is, "Glimpses of Mahayana," by Chogyam Trungpa. One quote, out of many, I like from this book is (p. 21): "If we develop friendliness to ourselves, we could extend that to others---in a sense it is others; nevertheless, it is us at the same time. It is a very dubious relationship: it is not exactly the other other, but the seemingly other, which constantly bounces back on us. So extending to others is predominantly and basically a way of making friends with ourselves."

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 11:25 am

  • donna says:

    My favorite book is the Truth of Suffering. It is a special look at the first noble truth and all that follows. For me it signals the beginning of discovering freedom.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 12:14 pm

  • Matt says:

    Greetings and Blessings,

    The lifetime and legacy of Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche has been an important treasure which connects the wisdom of a real and profound lineage, with the modern age and our challenges... specifically here in the west.

    Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche appears to share a unique perspective in transmission of the dharma that welcomes readers to investigate their existence. There is profound gratitude, appreciation, and humorous joy which celebrates this experience.

    May all beings be Now liberated from suffering and enlightened to our true nature.

    Thanks and Peace

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 1:17 pm

  • Tom purcell says:

    I love this site.It is a clear beacon of light in a often murky world.Thankyou.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 1:18 pm

  • Larry says:

    My current favorite is from Truth of Suffering: "The problem with the word 'path' is that we automatically think the road has been built and the highway is open to us so we can drive non-stop. ... In fact, the path does not really exist unless you are available. It is as if you are the road worker, the surveyor and the traveler all at once. As you go along, the road gets built, the survey's done and you become a traveler."

    A good reminder that some days we can just sail along, some days we have to be part of the construction crew, and some days all you can do is try to figure out where this damn road is supposed to go.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 1:32 pm

  • kate says:

    Smile at Fear is absolutely brilliant! i have been reading dharma books for 15years and this is a gold mine.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 1:34 pm

  • Neil Friedman says:

    On a hot August Sunday evening 37 years ago I was sitting writing in my journal while I, along with the entire Naropa community sat waiting for Chogyam Trungpa to arrive to deliver his weekly teaching. Rinpoche was late, and the room was restless with the voices of the many people in attendance. I felt a hand on brush my shoulder. looking up, our eyes met and he said to me words I still remember "Keep doing what you are doing" He smiled and walked onto the stage.
    What ever it was that he felt I should keep doing, I have continued to do eben until this day 37 years later.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 1:39 pm

  • Andea Pucci says:

    Tantra, the path of knowing purity of body, speech and mind

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 2:24 pm

  • Jason Zontanos says:

    "Just jump in. You can do it." These simple sentences get at the kind of heart with which Rinpoche taught...gentle,kind, and encouageing, yet direct and uncompromising in his understanding of his studetns.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 2:51 pm

  • Patricia says:

    Oh, you darlings! Minutes ago, I wished I had a set of the Collected Works.

    My favorite saying was reported by Lady Diana Mukpo in Dragon Thunder, p. 25 "He used to say to me that there was a point in your spiritual development where you could either go crazy or become enlightened. He was right there, on that point."

    At a crisis point, I googled "Bodhisattva" and came up with "Merging Compassion into Reality Kilung Jigme Rinpoche" at the Boston Shambhala Center. The following year I entered The Way of Shambhala.

    As for books: Transcending Madness gives such a clear parallel between the bardos and neuroses. I keep Training the Mind nearby to contemplate a slogan for the day. True Perception expands my vision and my awareness.

    Thank you for this generous gift to the winner of this contest.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 3:45 pm

  • kathryn carlson says:

    I love reading Oceans of Dharma. Being a warrior is being sensitive to all life, and all people. Please enter me in the draw for the sacred books, to study Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche, a great teacher.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 3:55 pm

  • Susan Sitzmann says:

    I bow my head before you in humbleness, I am what I am.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 4:17 pm

  • Bruce says:

    More and more I realize that I only need one beautiful antique in the room...not the junk shop my ego would have me collect.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 4:17 pm

  • Jason Zontanos says:

    “Just jump in. You can do it.” These simple sentences get at the kind of heart with which Rinpoche taught…gentle, kind, and encouraging, yet direct and uncompromising in his understanding of his students.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 4:32 pm

  • arnie nordman says:

    Just finished SOM...HUM HUM HUM1

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 4:35 pm

  • Cathy Creel says:

    The purpose of meditation practice is to try to save oneself from psychosis.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 4:44 pm

  • Sandy Vondrasek Cooch says:

    Every time I read a new-to-me book by Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche it's my new favorite. Currently I am reading "Taming the Mind." Very kind, often funny, very precise, and beaming a light on the reader. Here is a current fav from that book; "Relative bodhichitta comes from the simple and basic experience of realizing that you could have tender heart in any situation." Thanks to Ms. Gimian and everyone who keeps the quotes coming!

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 4:56 pm

  • Katherine Walker says:

    "In the garden of gentle sanity,
    May you be bombarded by the coconuts of wakefulness."

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 4:56 pm

  • Heather Butler says:

    "Anything that is created must sooner or later die.
    Enlightenment is permanent because we have not produced it; we have merely discovered it."
    ~Chogyam Trungpa

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 5:10 pm

  • Kent says:

    To have this collection would be a great reminder of Chogyam's endless wisdom. Thanks for the great e-mails

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 5:49 pm

  • Phyllis says:

    ...all thoughts vanish into emptiness, like the imprint of a bird in the sky....

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 6:14 pm

  • Laurie Morales says:

    I am always looking for new words of wisdom. I haven't read any of Choyyan Trungpa Rinpoches' books but I've read many of Pema Chodrons' and gone to her Smile At Fear retreat. He must be wonderful because I adore her! So I say go to the source that taught her!

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 6:38 pm

  • Hollis Marriott says:

    Chogyam Trunga Rinpoche's Cutting through Spiritual Materialism was very important and helpful. It came at a time early in the journey when I was really "enjoying" and "benefitting" from Buddhist practice. He made clear to me that spirituality itself can be afflictive if done with the wrong motivations, goals.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 7:00 pm

  • Richard Holden says:

    I always remember Rinpoche's mention in Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism...How the skilled farmer "plows the field of bodhi"..."does not waste the manure"...Years after reading this.. it seems one of the most relevant points in Dharma, particularly Vajrayana...The mind of confusion is the wisdom mind simply by applying awareness..inseparable from emptiness...How wonderfull that everything is used on the path...
    There is no waste...Eh Ma Ho...

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 8:00 pm

  • marion rae says:

    "Cutting through confusion is an easy matter if we know what to cut."

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 8:18 pm

  • Shivani says:

    "Magic is the power within oneself. You have enough strength, exertion and energy to view things as they are, personally, properly, and directly. You have the chance to experience the brightness of life and the haziness of life, which is also a source of power. The fantastically sharp-edged quality of life can be experienced personally and directly. There is a powerful sense of perception available to you."

    I am grateful for this quote as it reminds me that all we need is already within ourselves. During these trying times when I am fearing loss of many varieties, my nervous system may completely relax.. The door of perception opens.. Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche blesses us by reminding us that life is magical in all it has to offer. When I can see clearly, I can think and respond clearly; there is no better gift than clear perception which is bestowed upon us from the Great Ones. Blessings to everyone.

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 9:33 pm

  • Camilla says:

    I found his books so inspiring! Would love to have them all!

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 9:51 pm

  • Markus Werner says:

    "When human beings lose their connection to nature, to heaven and earth, then they do not know how to nurture their environmect or how to rule their world - which is saying the same thing. Human beings destroy their ecology at the same time that they destroy one another. From that perspective, healing our society goes hand in hand with healing our personal, elemental connection with the phenomenal world." - If we could progress there life on mother earth has a chance to survive ... I really feel with the people in JAPAN ...

    Posted on March 18, 2011 at 10:55 pm

  • Josh Volovik says:

    Rinpoche spoke about a well trained athlete and his ability to regain his footing the instant he felt himself beginning to slip. In the same way, we must bring our training to bear and recognize mentally the instant we begin to slip, applying corrective action to prevent a fall, and thus keeping our mindfulness intact.

    Posted on March 19, 2011 at 1:37 am

  • Nadia says:

    I recently joined my local Shambhala meditation centre (Montreal) so I'm not very familiar with Chogyam Trungpa writings yet. But from reading the above replies, if I don't win the set of the eight-volume in the draw, The first book I will certainly buy will be "Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior".

    Posted on March 19, 2011 at 2:59 am

  • Phuntsok Rabten says:

    The book that springs to mind foremost is "Crazy Wisdom". Apart from the direct subject matter of Tantra, insights into the manifestations of Guru Rinpoche, and spontaneous play of enlightened wisdom, it is a great classic that modern masters deem must be re-translated into Chokey and Sanskrit, for the benefit of many sentient beings not familiar with the english language, and for arresting the degeneration of Buddhism into Spiritual Materialism in this dark age.
    Thank you all ...
    May the sangha's aspirations and activities always flourish

    Posted on March 19, 2011 at 5:32 am

  • Tina says:

    I only recently discovered the teachings of Trungpa Rinpoche and I can honestly say they are tranformative. Thank you for keeping these wonderful teachings alive!

    Posted on March 19, 2011 at 6:52 am

  • Lina S says:

    Being a Shambhala warrior is life transforming...soul evolution.

    Posted on March 19, 2011 at 7:15 am

  • brad says:

    Currently hanging out w/the great folks at SFShambhala, testing the teachings. The hottest fires make the purest gold!

    Posted on March 19, 2011 at 8:28 am

  • Paula Breymeier says:

    "Life is fickle and merciless." A la la ho!

    Posted on March 19, 2011 at 9:21 am

  • Rachel Sheinin says:

    I enjoy all of Trungpas's teachings. Lately I have been thinking about what he says about gurus, and how their job is to "insult" your ego. Difficult to take, but neccessary.

    Posted on March 19, 2011 at 9:49 am

  • Lourdes says:

    I am amazed how and wonder if someone whom I never met in person, although there were unwittingly close brushings, be my root guru.... my heart aches and rejoices and laughs and ponders, plumbs and climbs with him and his magic. I always anticipate opening the Ocean of Dharma email with delight and trepidation! Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!

    Posted on March 19, 2011 at 10:00 am

  • Llew Watkins says:

    'You can do it' is a continual reminder for me.

    I really believe that, and I think that is the case because I trust Rinpoche completely.
    Nevertheless I need this reminder because it is sharp enough to cut through to a sense of basic confidence.

    x

    Posted on March 19, 2011 at 10:11 am

  • Qayyum says:

    I discovered an original publication in the Tassajara Zen Mountain Center library which contained Trungpa Rinpoche's elucidation of the 4 foundations of mindfulness. I have found it a continuous well-spring of inspiration in approaching the path as the goal & bringing the mind & body into one suchness. Very practical & simple-seeming, apprehendable even, at the first read, but with some compelling quality of unknowability perfumed throughout. I am immensely grateful to Rinpoche & all his students who collaborate to bring his perspective into this troubled world. May all be free from suffering.

    Posted on March 19, 2011 at 11:37 am

  • Louise M Wright says:

    From The Lion's Roar: A guru does not really transmit spiritual entities into us or through us. A guru just reminds us that there is sanity already in us.
    Chogyam Trungpa

    Posted on March 19, 2011 at 11:49 am

  • Richard Proctor says:

    My present favorite is TRUE PERCEPTION as it clearly addresses contemporary visual art making; an important activity ignored or glossed over in modern Buddhist writing.

    Posted on March 19, 2011 at 12:36 pm

  • Llani says:

    Honestly, I have not read any of his books, but have purchased "Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism" and "True Perception - The Path of Dharma Art."

    Posted on March 19, 2011 at 12:55 pm

  • Tara says:

    This passage caught my attention several weeks ago, and it's given me a new lens to look through:

    "According to the hinayana teachings, you have to be very practivcal; you are going to do something about suffering. On a very personal leverl, you are going to do something about it. To begin with, you could give up your scheme of what you ideally want in your life. Pleasure, enjoyment, happiness-- you could give up those possibilities altogether. In turn, you could try to be kind to others, or at least stop inconveniencing others."

    (from the introduction to The Truth of Suffering and the Path of Liberation)

    How about that as a starting point?! Just stop inconveniencing others. I love his clarity and directness.

    Posted on March 19, 2011 at 1:01 pm

  • Kimberly Carmitchel says:

    I believe one of my favorite teachings of Rinpoche's is his description of how we freeze space and create duality. Rinpoche uses the analogy of going very fast in a car. Everything is going smoothly, until we step out of flow, and realize we are careening 'fast', and in this action, this 'putting on the brakes', we wreck. Quite frequently I think of this teaching, and realize that as long as I stay in flow, the spontaneous present moment, there is nothing to wreck. Thank you.

    Posted on March 19, 2011 at 2:24 pm

  • Cat Fink says:

    'First Thought, Best Thought' is my favourite book. Although I had read some of his work already, I was not yet on the path of practice or part of the Shambhala sangha. His poetry whispered, spoke, shouted, sang to the artist within me.

    Posted on March 19, 2011 at 2:32 pm

  • archie jennings says:

    From brewing the beer of fearlessness-i was moved by the concept of utilizing your own fear to address the issues that make you afraid. The act of becoming of aware of your own fear releases the energy you need to get beyond the fear instead of becoming paralyzed by the fear. The release that comes with the awareness is not only euphoric but purifying. It is a time of clear insight and freshness of all things at one time.

    Posted on March 19, 2011 at 2:40 pm

  • Steve Blake says:

    Many, many thanks, not only for your wonderful quotes, but for all the editing that you have done over many years of Rinpoche's many talks. You are making a truly great contribution to Rinpoche's legacy and the preservation of the dharma in the West.

    Posted on March 19, 2011 at 3:54 pm

  • patrick says:

    I return often to the teachings on the Paramitas.

    Posted on March 19, 2011 at 5:32 pm

  • 46 & 2 says:

    I am thankful for all the opportunities to access wisdom in my life

    Posted on March 19, 2011 at 8:15 pm

  • avanika weiser says:

    I related to the 3/18/11 teaching that "good" pictures in Tantric Art are without "con", which I interpret as:
    copied, imitated, replicated, duplicated from something someone else did before rather than originating from ones' own unique, creative imagination.
    One might ask: Is this anothers' technique,approach, palette, or themes I have seen before? Avanika NSCAD '08

    Posted on March 19, 2011 at 11:04 pm

  • Eva Pietzcker says:

    I just discovered Chögyam Trungpa and am still speechless. Right now I am reading and dealing with "The Sacred Path of the Warrior" card set. I LOVE it! Thank you so much.

    Posted on March 20, 2011 at 8:28 am

  • Marilyn Gabriel says:

    I first started practicing Tibetan Buddhism and studying Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche when I was 18 years old. Throughout the rest of my life, I have continued to return to his wisdom and guidance with surprise and wonder. Most recently, I read "Sadhana of Mahamudra Sourcebook." I'll be turning 52 on April 4th and of course, be thrilled to have the collection of writings by Rinpoche.

    Posted on March 20, 2011 at 9:39 am

  • Goe says:

    ”In the garden of gentle sanity
    May you be bombarded by coconuts of wakefulness.”

    - Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche, The Places That Scare You

    Wisdom delivered with parsimony and poetic voice.

    Posted on March 20, 2011 at 9:52 am

  • Arlin Kent says:

    In this era of speed and acronyms, Trungpa Rinpoche left us with TGS to express the inseparability of of unadorned as-it-is-ness with limitless potentiality.

    Posted on March 20, 2011 at 10:48 am

  • Jenny Ward says:

    The quote of Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche's that has had a major influence on my life and in that way is my favourite is from Shambhala Warrior: "Fearlessness is not walking down the road with a Swiss army knife in your pocket" (I went to check that the quote was word perfect but found that the book was missing from my bookshelves...again.) It's a book I have given as a present or lent to people many times over the years.
    These words opened my mind to accepting and embracing circumstances in everyday life and in meditation and this has been of profound benefit, I feel deep gratitude to Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche for this

    Posted on March 20, 2011 at 1:06 pm

  • Eduardo Visconte says:

    Today's quote :D

    THE ARTFUL QUALITY OF TANTRA

    Tantra, the ultimate teaching of Buddhism, is fantastically precise and pure. There is a pronounced artful quality. Tantric practitioners are good artists, who paint good pictures that do not try to con one. Tantric practitioners are good musicians, who do not fool around banging away at random, but play precisely, musically.
    ( I'm thinking of Frank Zappa and how he happily
    combined them together)

    ...the everyday reality that shines bright and
    true, the opportunity that its lost in 'the con'.
    I'm grateful for Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche teachings...I would love to get the 8 volume collected works !!! ( he says rubbing the palms of his hands together in expectation)
    Thank You and Thanks for Traffic Tonglen !! :D

    Posted on March 21, 2011 at 6:53 am

  • Joan Willoe says:

    One of my favorite quotes from Chogyam Trungpa is from his book, CUTTING THROUGH SPIRITUAL MATERIALISM: "Meditation involves seeing the transparency of concepts, so that labeling no longer serves as a way of solidifying our world and image of self. Labeling becomes simply the act of discrimination." I find this particularly important and useful to me because I struggle with judgment/intellectualization as a way of "dealing with" and mananging my experiences in the world.

    Posted on March 21, 2011 at 8:50 am

  • Lea Basch says:

    My heart favorite will always be the book Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism. It was the first that I read and it was the first spiritual reading that resonated in sooo long--and I was in the midst of plenty that didn't. This actually brought me to the nearest Dharmadhatu--and I never left.

    Posted on March 21, 2011 at 9:45 am

  • Andrea says:

    My favorite book is: "The Sanity We Are Born With".
    I enjoyed the connections between the Eastern teachings and the Western mind.

    Posted on March 21, 2011 at 9:53 am

  • Jodi Gulka says:

    Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism should be on everyone's must-read list. Really brilliantly captures the tendencies of the mind to cling and grasp at things and the way this binds us further instead of freeing us.

    Posted on March 21, 2011 at 10:17 am

  • Neely Ashmun says:

    "This is your world. This is your feast. You inherited this; you inherited these eyeballs; you inherited this world of color. Look at the greatness of the whole thing. Look! Don't hesitate--look! Open your eyes. Don't blink, and look, look--look futher. Then you might see something."--CT

    Thanks for the reminder, Chewingum.

    Posted on March 21, 2011 at 12:00 pm

  • Matt Walsh says:

    By luck and grace the books will come my way (or not).

    Posted on March 21, 2011 at 10:30 pm

  • Cameron says:

    I've only been able to read pieces of his writings here and there and thank Shambhala for his oh so well done email newsletter. But his complete works sound like such a blissful knife to cut through all the egotistic and societal crap one has to deal with on a daily basis.

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 6:32 am

  • Wake up Boston! » Blog Archive » One Becomes the Teaching says:

    [...] Of Interest to Readers On April 4th, Shambhala Publications is giving away a set of the eight-volume Collected Works of Chögyam Trungpa to celebrate Chögyam Trungpa and reaching 10,000 subscribers to Ocean of Dharma. To enter, tell us your favorite book, article, or saying by Chögyam Trungpa and why you like it in a comment on the editor’s blog. [...]

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 12:11 pm

  • Alanda Wraye says:

    'Keep moving', which means don't fixate, and 'chaos is good news' have continued to unfold deep meaning for me.

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 12:24 pm

  • sandy says:

    "In the garden of gentle sanity may you be bombarded by coconuts of wakefulness." I really like the Sacred Path of the Warrior.

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 12:24 pm

  • Cristiano says:

    Every piece of Chogyan's writing is precious, for it makes me realize the beauty and yet simple aspect of perfection in reality.

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 12:31 pm

  • Peter DeCicco says:

    "There’s no point in splitting your basic being into several parts and trying to suppress certain parts and cultivate others. If we don’t have allegiance toward samsara or nirvana, then we free ourselves from any dogma, any bondage. Some sense of ultimate relaxation begins to occur."

    Great quote that relaxes the mind and acknowledges the self and the SELF together.

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 12:36 pm

  • Marc Otto says:

    I have been enjoying the chapter "Working With Negativity" in the myth of freedom. It is a gripping description of both our predicament and way of working with our predicament. I expect to still be reading and learning from the chapter for many years to come.

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 12:37 pm

  • Sean Glancy says:

    My favorite book by Trungpa Rinpoche is Training the Mind, for more or less sentimental reasons. It was the first Dharma book I ever read, nearly twenty years ago. Of course the slogans are timeless, and Rinpoche's commentary still reads as fresh today as it did then.

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 12:41 pm

  • Erika Knerr says:

    "All your polarities are equally valid, whether weakness or strength. There’s no point in splitting your basic being into several parts and trying to suppress certain parts and cultivate others. If we don’t have allegiance toward samsara or nirvana, then we free ourselves from any dogma, any bondage. Some sense of ultimate relaxation begins to occur." I love this. It's particularly potent for me now.

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 12:41 pm

  • Jai says:

    I love all the Dorje Kasung teachings, followed by Journey Without Goal.
    Favorite quote:"Hold all the suffering and pain of samsara in your heart, while seeing the vision of the Great Eastern Sun, then you can make a proper cup of tea."

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 12:43 pm

  • Gayle says:

    I just found your website and signed up for the Quotes of the week. I really have liked what I have read online. I don't own any of Chögyam Trungpa's books, so I would love to be chosen to receive his collected works.

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 12:48 pm

  • Chris Hazzard says:

    To take one quote is not possible. Just this morning I was grumbling to myself that I haven't had an Ocean of Dharma quote for a while and then a really relevant quote pops into my inbox an reminds me that it is time to get up and meditate.

    These two quotes though are my guides.

    “Hold the sadness and pain of samsara in your heart and at the same time the power and vision of the Great Eastern Sun. Then the warrior can make a proper cup of tea.”

    “Only to the extent that we expose ourselves over and over to annihilation can that which is indestructible be found in us.”

    I do love the quote posted by Rev. Danny Fisher though. He gets my vote for the prize.

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 12:53 pm

  • Nosh Nalavala says:

    I first learned about Chögyam Trungpa's book Cutting through Spiritual Materialism from the Sufi Teacher Murshida Ivy Duce. She sent me a copy of the book and it transformed my life. The words of Chögyam Trungpa took me right through the doors of perception and gave me an insight to true spirituality.

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 1:00 pm

  • John Kernell says:

    I own and have read the first three volumes of Trungpa's Collected Works. At 77, it is my intention to have read (and, in many cases, re-read) all of his collected works by the age of 90. Trungpa sent my root teacher, Lama Shenpen Hookham to India to study and to serve. He also served as her husband Michael Hookham (Rigdzin Shikpo)'s teacher. Directly or indirectly,Trungpa has had an enormous influence on my spiritual and daily life.

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 1:01 pm

  • Geoffrey says:

    My favorite Rimpoche quote is, "Everything is workable." These three words have been transformational in my life and practice.

    Geoffrey

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 1:02 pm

  • Bernie says:

    I love all of Trungpa's work: from Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism to Shambala to Abhidharma to Crazy Wisdom to The Lion's Roar to True Perception. He spoke directly to us in our time and with our cultural understanding as a prism to refract the wisdom of the dharma

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 1:24 pm

  • Bernie says:

    my favorite phrase of Trungpa comes from his earlier work Meditation in Action: "the manure of experience": nothing is wasted in the journey. Everything can be digested, to supply the fodder for the growth process that can be spun into gold.

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 1:28 pm

  • Adela Iglesias says:

    "Don't take samsara personally". Every time I remember these words by Trungpa Rinpoche, space opens in front of me, I am able to breathe more deeply and when very lucky, I'm actually able to relax and let go.

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 1:50 pm

  • Christopher Diggins says:

    Trungpa was a brilliant teacher and this is best illustrated in Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism where he speaks Of spiritual materialism. It is such a critical aspect of truth teachings and very few teachers have the knowledge and skill to present or understand this concept. The only other teachers who have broached this topic are his followers.

    No one teacher, Buddhist or otherwise has contributed so much love and wisdom to the West.

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 2:08 pm

  • Melissa Silva says:

    "Good and bad, happy and sad, all thoughts vanish like the imprint of a bird in the sky."
    That's my favorite expression by CTR. It sounds so simple, but it's totally ATI!

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 2:15 pm

  • andrew merz says:

    definitely the disappointment chapter in Myth of Freedom. "We fall down and down and down, until we touch the ground, until we relate with the basic sanity of earth."

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 2:42 pm

  • John Peterson says:

    "Reincarnation - that's not the good news"

    To me this has represented Chogyam Trungpa's view that a great deal could be accomplished on the path of dharma in this life and that we must not expect to get it right 'the next time around'.

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 3:08 pm

  • Scott says:

    Recently I moved into an apartment that was filthy and all I could remember is the part in Shambhala:POTW was his discussion of why we clean...

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 3:30 pm

  • Barbara Weaner says:

    Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism

    over and over and over without end.

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 3:40 pm

  • Jay says:

    Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism is my favorite book. (So far!)

    The explanation of clinging to spiritual practice is so profound and insightful. It certainly was an "a-ha" moment for me.

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 3:50 pm

  • Barbara R. says:

    ALL YOUR POLARITIES ARE VALID

    A critical attitude towards oneself doesn’t mean that you have to be hateful of yourself. The critical attitude can be accompanied by compassion and warmth. All your polarities are equally valid, whether weakness or strength. There’s no point in splitting your basic being into several parts and trying to suppress certain parts and cultivate others. If we don’t have allegiance toward samsara or nirvana, then we free ourselves from any dogma, any bondage. Some sense of ultimate relaxation begins to occur.

    Oftentimes my mind tunes into what I refer to as Radio PTSD and I wish to change the channel, in what feels like a life/death struggle. Remembering to be compassionate with myself instead of splitting myself into pieces trying to rid myself of memories that do not serve me, remembering my true nature, is currently a challenge for my mind on and off the mat. I read and reread the above quote in order for my mind to find liberation and to encoourage friendship with whatever "it'" is that haunts me.

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 4:06 pm

  • Tom N. says:

    "Fearlessness comes from fear." pp.76 Smile at Fear

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 4:40 pm

  • leo teehankee says:

    my favorite chogyam trungpa quote is 'no hope, no fear'...why? because 'no hope' means there is nothing to attain, and with nothing to attain, there is no hindrance in the mind, no hindrance, therefore no fear

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 4:49 pm

  • Mike B says:

    My favorite book by CTR is "Shambhala: Sacred Path of the Warrior" and of course "Cutting through Spiritual Materialism".....of course again....every book I read by Trungpa Rinpoche, is one of my favorites.

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 5:05 pm

  • MB says:

    Love all of his books and teachings! Only wished I could have seen him in person...very inspiring teacher.

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 5:08 pm

  • Guido Sanchez says:

    "Compassion automatically invites you to relate with people because you no longer regard people as a drain on your energy."

    I find this quote uplifting and relevant each and every day as I come in contact with close friends and family who are exhausted by people in the world who feel "toxic" to them. If they shifted their framework toward one of compassion, they could retain their energy, and thus share it with the other, and so on.

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 5:16 pm

  • Debbie Leeper says:

    Who killed my only father? Who killed my only mother?
    Who caused the rain of blood? Who gathered the black clouds of the thunderbolts?
    Who caused the earthquake that shook the whole world?
    I asked these questions in the middle of a crowd
    But no one was able to answer.
    So I asked a second time and a third,
    Shouting at the top of my voice.
    My mind was blank and I didn’t know what to think.

    Suddenly the great red wind of karma arose.
    The king of death appeared on the face of the earth and raised a fearful hailstorm.
    The flag of no-retreat, emblazoned with the knot of eternity, unfurls before the storm.
    Even the wind of karma takes delight in blowing it.
    The truth of the pattern emerges
    And unshakable confidence is aroused.
    Now I am certain, I am fearless,
    There is no retreat:
    The voice of truth is heard throughout the world.
    ****beautiful****

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 5:33 pm

  • simon says:

    “Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior.”

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 5:39 pm

  • Silas says:

    One of my favorite poignant CTR quotes is

    'In order to overcome selfishness, it is necessary to be daring. It is as though you were
    dressed in your swimsuit, standing on the diving board with a pool in front of you, and
    you ask yourself: “Now what?” The obvious answer is: “Jump.”

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 7:10 pm

  • Michael Wallin says:

    My favorite Trungpa book is MEDITATION IN ACTION, because it was the first book of his I read, because it's concise and because it offers a very concise and down-to-earth way to bring the insights & tools of Tibetan Buddhism to one's everyday life.

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 8:46 pm

  • Karolyn Hoover says:

    From SHAMBHALA The Sacred Path of the Warrior, I like, "The Shambhala teachings are founded on the premise that there is basic human wisdom that can help to solve the world's problems. This wisdom does not belong to any one culture or religion, nor does it come only from the West or the East. Rather it is a tradition of human warrior-ship that has existed in many cultures at many times throughout history."
    This offers hope, & helps me to integrate the Dharma with other timeless and universal teachings.

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 8:55 pm

  • Joseph Naeem says:

    "The Path is the Goal" is my favorite.

    The title says it all!

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 9:03 pm

  • cintra says:

    "Good and bad, happy and sad, all thoughts vanish into emptiness like the imprint of a bird in the sky." -Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche

    from The Sadhana of Mahamudra...the first Dharma class i attended at SF Dharmadhatu....manie, manie years ago.
    this quote stuck w/me from the beginning...although i didn't understand then, that i suffered from a clinical depression, this quote helped me through difficult times....loosening the grip of moods a little bit...XO

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 9:37 pm

  • Mary Anne Botha says:

    "The main point is to have a heart. If you don't have a heart, you have to build one. If you need further reinforcements, take a piece of my heart. You have it. It's yours." VCT
    This exhortation resonates and inspires each time I bring it to mind. As a warrior I am reminded that the practice of building a heart is urgent and do-able, and that the example and support of the wonderful teachers in the Shambhala lineage is unconditional and for the taking.

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 10:08 pm

  • Jenny Ward says:

    I have already made my comment but wanted to add that if I was fortunate enough to receive these volumes I would like to present them to my teacher at KEBI in Melbourne.

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 10:14 pm

  • Amelia says:

    "If everything were lovey-dovey, there would be nothing to work with. Without others and the challenges they present, we would have no chance at all to develop beyond ego. So the idea here is to feel grateful that others are presenting us with tremendous obstacles. Without them, we could not follow the path at all."

    I can get frustrated easily when things don't go my way. This quote/idea has helped me to relax and accept everything with gratitude.

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 10:16 pm

  • Catherine Andral says:

    When I lived in Boulder, Colorado, I heard a lot about Chögyam Trungpa, and what I heard turned me on to Buddhism. The book of the dead is a fundamental one for me, throughout my life.
    Lately the quote that touches me, again and again is: "If we don’t have allegiance toward samsara or nirvana, then we free ourselves from any dogma, any bondage. Some sense of ultimate relaxation begins to occur."

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 10:30 pm

  • eileen furgerson says:

    Too much brilliant stuff for me to make a choice and why chose anyway, why not have it all! The greatest thing of all that he did was to leave us Pema Chodron and all the fruits of the many many seeds he planted in her.

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 11:00 pm

  • eileen furgerson says:

    Thank you

    Posted on March 22, 2011 at 11:01 pm

  • Eloy Portillo says:

    I like very much "Cutting through spiritual materialism". It is the very first book by Chögyam Trungpa I was recommended to read and I have read it again lots of times. I enjoy its clarity and precission.

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 1:26 am

  • Kathleen Singh says:

    The Myth of Freedom...like a first love, it moved my mind to new places, changed the course my life took...

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 1:28 am

  • wade wilson says:

    Sacred Path of the Warrior - one chapter, everyday...over and over again. Always something to learn, always fresh, always insightful.

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 2:05 am

  • olivier says:

    "Meditation involves seeing the transparency of concepts, so that labeling no longer serves as a way of solidifying our world and our image of self."

    I love this quote because in a few words it shows how practice can bring us more in touch with everything and with ourselves by progressively decrease ego layers.

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 2:24 am

  • Adam Stubbs says:

    Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior is by far one of my favorite books... period. I've been reading it for almost ten years and there is a richness and depth in this book that never seems to get old.

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 3:14 am

  • Anky Aarts says:

    If you keep a sense of humor and have distrust in the rules laid down around you, there will be success.

    Thank you so much for all the weekly quotes, much appreciated.

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 3:38 am

  • David Guy says:

    Twenty-one years ago, when I was in the back of a bus in Mexico and talking to a woman about my newfound interest in Buddhism, she told me there were two books I needed to read: Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism and Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior. Both titles sounded odd to me, especially the second one, and I never imagined I'd read them. But within a few years (and after starting a meditation practice) I had read both, and I regard them as Trungpa's two great works. I somehow prefer the Shambhala vision just because it seems so universal, and because it seems so much like Zen practice (which is what I now do). I've read the book five or six times. It's still my favorite.

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 3:55 am

  • Diane says:

    I've not really read Chögyam Trungpa. My introduction has really been through Pema Chodron and believe it or not, Natalie Goldberg. She has many books that tie writing and zen practices together. Really good stuff. Worth checking out.

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 4:04 am

  • Felice says:

    "Myth of Freedom" continues to be my favorite book and the first book I ever read on Buddhism. I picked it up several years ago when I was working through depression, and right in the opening pages, Trungpa says - No one is going to solve your problems for you.

    The bare honesty of this book was something I could trust, and I've been reading his work ever since.

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 4:45 am

  • Jane says:

    My favourite quote today is remembering the Vidyadhara saying "Your guess is as good as mine Sweetheart"

    It stopped my mind then. And now. Feels
    beyond hopelessness. No diagnosis. No sickness. No cure. No nirvana.
    Cuts through it all. Leaving nothing.
    Nothing to say nothing to do nothing to think.

    Just a vastitude of luminous emptiness, and the Vidyadhara’s smile.

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 4:50 am

  • Seth Levinson says:

    "Pain should be regarded as extremely good news"—VACT

    I don't think there is a teaching that Rinpoche gave that has resonated, devastated or inspired me as efficiently as this one.

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 5:04 am

  • Joanne Burgess says:

    Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism - why, because it caught me and for that I am forever grateful!

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 5:34 am

  • marion rae says:

    "All your polarities are equally valid"...because it is so true and as far as I can tell, it is the only way to integrate them and become more balanced...not to favour either side of a polarity allows me to be more balanced and less conflicted. It also allows my polarities to be quiet and still as they don't need to jump up and down and express a side for the opposite to disagree with, so it works out a whole lot better. That's why today it is my favourite saying...it is the one I am applying most today.

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 5:47 am

  • Steve Self says:

    I have always enjoyed:

    "If you are a warrior, decency means that you are not cheating anybody at all. You are not even about to cheat anybody. There is a sense of straightforwardness and simplicity. With setting-sun vision, or vision based on cowardice, straightforwardness is always a problem. If people have some story or news to tell somebody else, first of all they are either excited or disappointed. Then they begin to figure out how to tell their news. They develop a plan, which leads them completely away from simply telling it. By the time a person hears the news, it is not news at all, but opinion. It becomes a message of some kind, rather than fresh, straightforward news. Decency is the absence of strategy. It is of utmost importance to realize that the warrior’s approach should be simple-minded sometimes, very simple and straightforward. That makes it very beautiful: you having nothing up your sleeve; therefore a sense of genuineness comes through. That is decency."

    He speaks in a way that one becomes aware of one's own behaviors that are not straightforward, while at the same time pointing toward simplicity and letting go, rather than the often default effort of trying to control oneself into being the right way, or doing it the right way.

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 6:08 am

  • Cecil says:

    I never met CTR in person but thanks to his writings and your Ocean of Dharma Quotes I feel I'm in contact with his essence! No full moon goes by without me being reminded of this quote...

    FULL MOON IN YOUR HEART

    "The teacher, or the spiritual friend, enters your system much as medicine is injected into your veins. According to the tradition, this is known as planting the heart of enlightenment in your heart. It is transplanting the full moon into your heart. Can you imagine the full moon coming through your living room window and coming closer and suddenly entering your heart? On the one hand, unless you are terribly resentful, usually it is a tremendous relief: "Phew. The full moon has entered my heart." That's great, wonderful. On the other hand, however, when that particular full moon has entered into your heart, when it's transplanted into your heart, you might have a little panic. "Good heavens, what have I done? There's a moon in my heart. What am I going to do with it? It's too shiny!" By the way, once that moon has entered your heart, it cannot be a waning moon. It never wanes. It is always waxing."

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 8:20 am

  • Bryan Gillette says:

    My favorite quote is from Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism: "Walking the spiritual path is a very subtle process; it is not something to jump into naively. There are numerous sidetracks which lead to a distorted, ego-centered version of spirituality; we can deceive ourselves into thinking we are developing spiritually when instead we are strengthening our egocentricity through spiritual techniques."

    Often in my life I have persuaded myself that I was on a higher path of spiritual knowledge and discipline only later to realize that I was creating obstacles to compassion, generosity, and true knowledge. (This does not mean, however, that these obstacles weren't eventually boons in helping me relate and emphasize with others.)

    While my case may be one of extremes, I can say that misunderstanding "the path" in the past has led to such extreme suffering that I have wanted to end my suffering through self violence.

    Chogyam Trungpa's teachings "ring a bell" and help me to be more aware. I owe much gratitude to Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche and to Pema Chodron for their benevolent teaching.

    May all beings be free from suffer and the root of suffering. May all beings be happy.

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 8:45 am

  • Karuna Ojanen says:

    Recently: "If we don’t have allegiance toward samsara or nirvana, then we free ourselves from any dogma, any bondage. Some sense of ultimate relaxation begins to occur." Chogyam Trungpa. I read this after a weekend of Yoga Teacher Training where I felt that I wasn't _________ (fill in the blank: disciplined, strong, flexible, diligent, skinny, etc.) enough. Lots of judgment abound. Just to be a part of this universe is enough and is joyful. Chogyam Trungpa's readings are leading me home.

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 8:48 am

  • Christopher says:

    Crazy Wisdom put Chogyam over the top for me.

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 9:20 am

  • Renate Braul says:

    I'm currently reading Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior for the first time, and I know it won't be my last. The chapter on the genuine heart of sadness particularly resonated with me. I am amazed at how these Buddhist concepts I am somewhat familiar with are completely renewed by Rinpoche's words. I have never felt so close to the Dharma as when reading this book, which feels almost as if it were written specifically for me, and yet the messages apply to our commonalities. How special! Awakening human dignity is an incredibly powerful idea.

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 9:23 am

  • Marilyn says:

    In his introduction to TRAINING THE MIND AND CULTIVATING LOVING-KINDNESS, Trungpa says,

    "...I was relieved that Buddhism was so simple and that you could actually do something about it. You can actually practice. You can just follow the book and do as it says, which is extraordinarily powerful and such a relief."

    This remark has stayed with me and has led to my serious study of the Lojong Teachings as well as my gratitude to and love for Trungpa himself.

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 9:29 am

  • Veronica Klos says:

    There are way too many quotes that are my favorites. I think my favorite book, aside from Sacred Path, is They Myth of Freedom ... likely because it was the first book of his I read. I'm not sure where this quote is from, but I like it because it reminds us all that there is basic goodness within everyone that we all come from the same place. We just have to remember and tap into it through meditation, raising windhorse, taking drala journeys ~ however we can get there. It helps when communicating with others as well:

    When the sun rises, everybody is able to see it. The fundamental or ultimate sun lies in the hearts of all people. Therefore, everyone possesses fundamental well-being, brilliance, and purity, Whoever a person is, he or she is capable of crying and also capable of laughing. That is the indication that everyone has the Great Eastern Sun within them.
    CTR

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 9:30 am

  • jonah m bekerman says:

    more important than the words was the pointing which can occur with his words but so very often occurred with personal contact. i remember being on personal retreat after seminary on marpa poit going stir crazy and doing much hiking. i came down just as rinpche was going to fire puja.he was wearing yellow . he appeared to be thousands of years old. his communication came from a space so deep,so vast inseparable from the elements of nature itself.

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 9:31 am

  • Carol Hyman says:

    "You don't have to be afraid to be who you are."

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 9:36 am

  • Christine says:

    "The technique of meditation is the way to just do it. In meditation, life exposes itself to you, so you find yourself in the middle of a living situation. This requires an intuitive approach. Using your intuition in this way requires a positive attitude, a conviction that you are a basically healthy person and you are not condemned. Despite the shadow or the projections that may be cast on you, the point is to see through the shadow and just do it and live it. That is intuition."

    I love the optimism of Buddhism and going back to one's intuition to find one's way!

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 9:46 am

  • Liza says:

    I read "Shambhala: the sacred path of the warrior" in one sitting. Chogyam Trungpa's voice is unique and fresh, he makes familiar concepts resonate with new energy, and introduces more complex themes seamlessly and naturally.
    May all beings be happy

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 9:51 am

  • Michael Mallett says:

    I still find Meditation in Action to be one of my favorite writings by Rinpoche. It is clear, stripped bare and relentless in showing the way to liberation. I am thankful for all the wisdom and compassion evidenced in this body of work.

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 10:01 am

  • Justin Hudgins says:

    "Something living, something real, is taking place in everything."

    This is my favorite of the Vidyadhara's sayings because, to me, it demonstrates the principle that underneath all the bullshit we layer on the world around us and on ourselves, there's something very alive, something truly worthwhile.

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 10:04 am

  • Germaine says:

    I have just began my first book by Chögyam Trungpa so I am not well versed in him YET.
    So, this isn't really deep but I just like it...
    What a work of art is all about is a sense of delight. Thanks for yet another contest. You guys are the best!

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 10:06 am

  • doug sparling says:

    "Becoming "awake" involves seeing our confusion more clearly."

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 10:37 am

  • emanuele balzani says:

    read ''crazy wisdom'' - laughed a lot - lost one eye few days after - found the third soon after - thanx chogy ! love you ever xxx

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 10:40 am

  • Sarah Lipton says:

    "Irritation is the vanguard of the Great Eastern Sun." This is my current favorite quote by the Venerable Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche. It's just too perfect, especially in describing the path of working and living within enlightened society!

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 11:07 am

  • Toby Sifton says:

    "Anything else is a sidetrack"
    Myth of Freedom

    I picked this line randomly. There is nothing in his texts not wisdom.

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 11:08 am

  • chris jones says:

    my favorite article by chogyam trunpga was his writing on the bodhisattva vow found in the heart of the buddha...i read this during summer dathun at shambhala mountain center, and decided that it was time to take the refuge vow...making the leap!

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 12:12 pm

  • Robin says:

    My favorite quote which I received June 28, 2008 by email from the "Quotes of the Week" begins with:

    THE TRUTH OF AWARENESS
    "The practice of meditation is not designed to develop pleasure, but to understand the truth of suffering;"..."It is not necessarily that you do not suffer, but the haunting quality that fundamentally you are in trouble is removed."

    This quote reminds me to not have expectations from my meditation and to remember that whatever struggles I may experience during meditation is okay and will be removed if I just sit through it.

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 12:32 pm

  • colleen gilgenbach says:

    I only know of him thru Pema Chodron, who I greatly admire and would love to be exposed to her teacher"s teachings directly

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 12:56 pm

  • Chris says:

    “When you are frightened by something, you have to relate with fear, explore why you are frightened, and develop some sense of conviction. You can actually look at fear. Then fear ceases to be the dominant situation that is going to defeat you. Fear can be conquered. You can be free from fear if you realize that fear is not the ogre. You can step on fear, and therefore, you can attain what is known as fearlessness. But that requires that, when you see fear, you smile.”

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 3:04 pm

  • Tish Jennings says:

    I was very fortunate to have had the opportunity to hear Chogyam Trunpga Rinpoche back in the early '70s. “Shambhala: the sacred path of the warrior” has been a very important book in my spiritual growth and development.

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 3:07 pm

  • Denise Frye says:

    There were too many to choose from, so I just chose one that sounded right to me today.

    "Although your external circumstances may vary, your practice of exchanging yourself for others should not be dependent on that. Whether you are sick or well, rich or poor, have a good reputation or bad reputation, you should practice mind training. It is very simple: if your situation is right, breathe that out to the world; if your situation is wrong, breathe that in, taking it on yourself."

    From Training the Mind and Cultivating Loving Kindness, Slogan 50, page 107 in the Shambhala Classic Edition.

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 3:28 pm

  • Stacie says:

    I love this saying from Rinpoche - "Disappointment is the chariot of dharma." Very true, very succinct. I've also heard that he was fond of using the acronym "POOP" - Power over other people. He was very playful and funny and I can just hear him saying it. :)

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 3:44 pm

  • NellaLou says:

    If we regard meditation as just getting into a fog so that you do not see, you do not feel, something is terribly wrong. In that case meditation would reduce one to a zombie. The enlightened man would have to be rescued. Someone would have to feed him and take him to the bathroom. We would have to have an enlightenment ward.
    -Chogyam Trungpa in Glimpses of Abhidharma

    is my favorite quote. Named my first blog Enlightenment Ward because of it.

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 3:55 pm

  • Rachel Scales says:

    So far my favorite book is The Sacred Path of the Warrior. I really appreciate the part of the book where he is describing an interaction with his mother in which she says that she is of inferior birth and that he should not focus on his family name. The gentleness and pride he expresses in his ancestry really touched me. He had all this formal training and education and yet he acknowledges the wisdom of his mother.

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 4:04 pm

  • Nicolas says:

    Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism still rings true years later, just as his other writings, but this was the first landmark book I read by Trungpa Rinpoche and still kicks our western buddhist asses in such a distinctive way, truly pointing a mirror to our own delusions, and clarifying the way to bring them into the path. A timeless masterpiece!

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 4:53 pm

  • Kayleigh says:

    A life changing realization, one that truly changed my life is the basic tenant of suffering. "There is suffering and pain--someone actually has to say that. It is not polite conversation; it is serious conversation: there is pain. However, unless we have an understanding and acceptance of pain, we will have no way to transcend that pain." All my life I was told suffering was a test, a means of strengthening one's self. But I struggled with the pain and suffering I saw around me, and simply could not see that an infant stricken with cancer was some sort of test for that infant or more personally, the people struck down in natural disaster or war did any or could do anything to warrant such horrific events. The only way I could deal with the situations was to start with the premise that suffering and pain exists. My personal realization is that my purpose in life is to minimize that suffering or pain by whatever means I have possible.

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 5:18 pm

  • Pam says:

    Shambhala: Sacred Path of the Warrior.

    Classic.

    Or as Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche might say, "It's so juicy"

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 5:41 pm

  • Helen Sanchez says:

    "Everyone loves something, even if it's only tortillas."
    — Chögyam Trungpa

    This quote gives one hope that every human being is capable of love and if we nurture that aspect in everyone the world will be a better place.

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 6:12 pm

  • Alexa says:

    e are times to cultivate and create, when you nurture your world and give birth to new ideas and ventures. There are times of flourishing and abundance, when life feels in full bloom, energized and expanding. And there are times of fruition, when things come to an end. They have reached their climax and must be harvested before they begin to fade. And finally of course, there are times that are cold, and cutting and empty, times when the spring of new beginnings seems like a distant dream. Those rhythms in life are natural events. They weave into one another as day follows night, bringing, not messages of hope and fear, but messages of how things are.”
    This is so perfect. It is a reminder of how things are always shifting and changing- the suffering of change and we can accept this and not got weighed down by it, and maybe feel better about it.

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 6:52 pm

  • Bharath Simha says:

    Shambhala: The Tibetan book of Dead -- foreword by Chogyam Trungpa rinpoche with guru rinpoche's painting

    I like the Guru Rinpoche's painting by chogyam trungpa

    Posted on March 23, 2011 at 9:24 pm

  • Heli says:

    Hi!

    I love the quote "Just Do It" from January 31, 2011,
    because it gives such a simple advice: just do it.

    Posted on March 24, 2011 at 9:48 am

  • John Miller says:

    Currently I am enjoying Smile At Fear. It is very eye opening and revealing, pealing off the layers one by one.

    Posted on March 24, 2011 at 11:15 am

  • Pavitra says:

    With a little help from your friends: My daily dose of Smile At Fear helps me to not give up.

    Posted on March 24, 2011 at 11:57 am

  • David says:

    My introduction to Buddhism was with "Journey Without Goal", which somehow wound up in my hands amidst the hundred books on Buddhism in the bookstore. I was drawn to his description of a tantric practitioner's fearless openness to powerful life energy and panic. "If we are good tantra students, we open ourselves each moment. We panic a thousand times a day, 108 times an hour."

    Posted on March 24, 2011 at 12:30 pm

  • Joyce M says:

    I like the simplicity of the words; I take them and chew on them later.

    Posted on March 24, 2011 at 12:51 pm

  • B D says:

    "Every situation has spiritual significance. If you do not feel every step you take, then your pattern of mind becomes full of chaos and you begin to wonder where these problems are coming from. They just spring out of nowhere, because they are a signal that attention is needed. They are saying 'Something's wrong, and we want attention.' Situations demand attention because you refuse to see the subtlety of life. But if you are able to see the subtlety, if you pay attention, then they do not demand attention. Here it is impossible to cheat. You can't pretend that you can pour a cup of tea beautifully. You can't fake it. You can't cheat; rather, you actually have to feel it; you have to feel the earth and your relationship to it."

    I have just started reading Chogyam Trungpa's work, starting with the most recent book released. I hope to continue reading his work for a long time. The quote above expresses to me something I instinctively know but have not heard put in such simple terms. He is a great teacher and gift to the West who wish to learn about Buddhism.
    Thank you for the opportunity to read more.

    Posted on March 24, 2011 at 3:26 pm

  • Kris Talluto says:

    "Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism" is an enduring classic and a fundamental antidote for the way people use religion and spirituality to further their own agendas rather than embrace life and the world for what it actually is. Absolutely ESSENTIAL reading!

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 5:14 am

  • Kathie Paul says:

    One of my favorites is GREAT EASTERN SUN which starts "We are worthy to live in this world." I am always impressed that his words have so much power.

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 5:27 am

  • Gordon says:

    "For instance, if your car is partially damaged in an accident, you will still think in terms of getting it repaired. But if your car is totally wrecked, absolutely wrecked, you just give up, which is some sense of relief. It also contains a kind of joy, so it's not a terrible disaster, particularly; a sense of relief comes along with it. I hope you know what I mean.(Laughter) There's a sense of relief, a sense of freedom, free from a certain burden. Whereas if your car has a dent here and there, you have to take it to the body shop, you have to pay money and all the rest of it. That's more of a burden. But the whole thing is completely gone, completely wiped out, so it is a different experience. Totality of some kind is taking place there."

    Evam talk two

    I guess I like this quote because it captures something of the overwhelming quality of spaciousness.

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 5:38 am

  • Emily Danies says:

    Meditation in Action... I remember standing at in the St. Marks Bookstore in NY reading the entire book in January 1974. In March the Vidyadhara was in New York and I attended a seminar.... I've been a student ever since.

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 5:47 am

  • Fleet Maull says:

    Shambhala: Sacred Path of the Warrior is the most important, for me, of Trungpa Rinpoches many important works. Paraphrasing, a favorite quote from the book is, "What a warrior renounces is anything that separates himself/herself from others."

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 5:53 am

  • David E. Anderson says:

    Sit like a rhinocerose not like a bird perched on a limb.

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 5:59 am

  • Angela says:

    My favorite Trungpa Rinpoche quote is: "Just do it."

    It's simple, straightforward and direct. And I love the idea that he said it before Nike coined the term! ;)

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 6:21 am

  • Franz Ombico says:

    I really found a lot of resonance with Trungpa Rinpoche's teachings about the five Buddha families and how they relate to everyday life. No explanation I have read has come close to making such a complex concept understandable. May his teachings proliferate.

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 6:50 am

  • Claude Zachary says:

    "Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism" was my first connection to the Vidyadhara's mind, and changed my life by revealing the view and the path for my journey.

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 7:10 am

  • Carol Johnstone says:

    "You can do it." The Vidyadhara told me this at my first "formal" interview at RMDC in 1973. A Baker had driven me up through the rain in a jeep to the silver trailer where Rinpoche was staying. We sat in the jeep drinking tequila while the rain poured down and we waited for the previous person to finish their interview. When I entered the trailer, Rinpoche was sitting at a little table in a kimono. I said, "Hi Rinpoche! being rather affected by all the tequila. I had driven there from Berkeley to ask him if I could commit myself to "Maitri" as a patient, which is how I'd gotten the interview (I'd heard it was a place he'd set up for sangha having mental disturbances). I rhapsodized for a while about my hindu guru, then I told him that my ex-husband and his girlfriend has taken my son to a psychic reader who said that my son had a black aura with purple edges and that if he stayed with me he'd die by the age of three. I said I was pregnant again and wanted to get an abortion. I was rather distraught. He didn't really answer that question, but I asked again about Maitri. He said he didn't think I needed to go there (turned out it didn't really exist in the form I thought it did), but that if I felt the same way in a year, I should contact him again or write to Narayana (who later became the Regent) and ask him. Then he said, "you can do it." It's a simple statement, but it's a difficult one to explain. It felt very personal. There was a quality of belief and unconditional trust in me that I hadn't really felt from anyone else. It flipped my mind from feeling helpless and worthless to feeling empowered to change my life. I left feeling rather joyous, "I can do it! It'll take some work -- a lot -- but I can do it! I can become sane."

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 8:29 am

  • Beverly Morris Armstrong says:

    Thank you so much, Carolyn, for the ongoing practice of these quotes. And thank you everyone for reminding me of so many. My favorite is a word: "workable." The notion that everything is workable--not perfect, not fixed, and also is unknown, we can just step in and see what happens, this word is so big and also so touching earth and simple--has been profound for me and easy to share with others, practitioners and non-practitioners as well.

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 8:50 am

  • Jigme Urbonas says:

    From The Myth of Freedom, page 86:
    Love
    There is a vast store of energy which is not centered, which is not ego's energy at all. It is this energy which is the centerless dance of phenomena, the universe interpenetrating and making love to itself. It has two characteristics: a fire quality of warmth and a tendency to flow in a particular pattern, in the same way in which fire contains a spark as well as the air which directs the spark. And this energy is always on-going, whether or not it is seen through the confused filter of ego. It cannot be destroyed or interrupted at all. It is like the ever-burning sun. It consumes everything to the point where it allows no room for doubt or manipulation.

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 9:02 am

  • Sandra Jo Harper says:

    THE BEST PART OF HUMAN INSTINCT

    Everybody possesses the unconditioned possibility of cheerfulness, which is not connected purely with pain or pleasure. You have an inclination: in the flash of one second, you feel what needs to be done. It is not a product of your education; it is not scientific or logical; you simply pick up on the message. And then you act; you just do it. That basic human quality of suddenly opening up is the best part of human instinct. That is what we call basic goodness and unconditional instinct....Although you might be in the worst of the worst shape, still that goodness does exist.

    From "Working with Early Morning Depression," in GREAT EASTERN SUN: THE WISDOM OF SHAMBHALA

    What better message could there be?

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 9:46 am

  • Claudelle says:

    "That mind of fearfulness
    Should be put in the cradle of loving-kindness
    And suckled with the profound and brilliant milk of eternal doubtlessness. - CTR "Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior"

    There is something so profound about "the cradle of loving-kindness" that makes all situations workable for me...along this path and in relating with others.

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 9:59 am

  • Dudley Jackson says:

    My favorite book is "The Path is the Goal". Ironically it was the first one I read by him. I love so many of his books but the simplicity of his language and directness of the answers make that book great. One of my favorite quotes: "Don't be afraid of who you are."

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 10:03 am

  • Victoria Hagens says:

    "You don't have to believe everything you think." Among hundreds... But this one comes to mind again and again!

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 10:06 am

  • Alexis Neuhaus says:

    My favorite article of Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche is 'Maha Ati', written by Rigdzin Shikpo based on Rinpoche's teachings in England in the late 1960s. Such a brilliant, pure expression of the spirit of Dzogchen.

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 12:27 pm

  • Ben Bashore says:

    "Nonexistence is the only preparation for tantra and we should realize there is no substitute."

    -- Journey Without Goal

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 12:29 pm

  • Mark Wilensky says:

    If we believe our thoughts, we are placing our belief in something that is impermanent, that arises and then falls away. We are believing in nothing of substance.

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 12:37 pm

  • Kelkaya says:

    My favorite quote is "No Big Deal". Isn't that the truth!!

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 12:43 pm

  • Renee Flower says:

    This quote speaks volumes about the national politics of our era. Art and Music as metaphors for the activities of life. Each activity of life, even in politics, as a precise, artful, non-random, "not intended to mislead," act -- the precision and purity of action.

    "Tantra, the ultimate teaching of Buddhism, is fantastically precise and pure. There is a pronounced artful quality. Tantric practitioners are good artists, who paint good pictures that do not try to con one. Tantric practitioners are good musicians, who do not fool around banging away at random, but play precisely, musically."

    From “Visualization,” in The Dawn of Tantra, pages 378 to 379 in The Collected Works of Chögyam Trungpa, Volume Three.

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 12:51 pm

  • David Lynch says:

    Chögyam Trungpa's wit and wisdom have helped me through some very hard times. When I lost my leg Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior helped carry me through. My teacher/Guru Gelek Rimpoche is always quoting Chögyam Trungpa and has always said his teachings are pure and true to the Buddha. Since there is never going to be a way for me to own the Collected Works of Chögyam Trungpa any other way I would truly love to add them to my Dharma library.

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 12:53 pm

  • Tim Cassidy says:

    Too many favorite quotes to only pick one.
    I have been receiving the ocean of dharma quotes for over seven years. My favorite book of his is
    "Cutting through spiritual materialism"

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 1:20 pm

  • Chiara says:

    NEVER TRAPPED IN LIFE

    "We are never trapped in life, because there are constant opportunities for creativity, challenges for improvisation. Ironically, by seeing clearly and acknowledging our egolessness, we may discover that suffering contains bliss, impermanence contains continuity or eternity, and egolessness contains the earth quality of solid being. But this transcendental bliss, continuity, and beingness is not based on fantasies, ideas, or fears."

    There is great reassurance with this teaching because with our ego we so often feel there is only one way to do something and our grasping comes from fear that we will not gain what we want. The teaching is a reminder to oneself that transcending is accomplished not thru fear but thru ego-lessness, always words to live by.

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 1:30 pm

  • miguel ferreira (Brazil) says:

    BE GRATEFUL TO EVERYONE - November 24, 2010

    "Without this world we cannot attain enlightenment. There would be no journey. So in a sense all the things taking place around the world, all the irritations and all the problems, are crucial. In other words, we could say that if there is no noise outside during our sitting practice, we cannot develop mindfulness. If we do not have aches and pains in our body, we cannot attain mindfulness; we cannot actually meditate. If everything were lovey-dovey, there would be nothing to work with. Without others and the challenges they present, we would have no chance at all to develop beyond ego. So the idea here is to feel grateful that others are presenting us with tremendous obstacles. Without them, we could not follow the path at all."

    I like this quote because express the necessity to see the world with good eyes. Beyond the duality subject and object. The spiritual path is not an escape, it is not staying in the comfort zone. We always reject what bothers us. This is the obstacle. We are conditioned to reject. This quote should be read every day, to remind us to be grateful for everything and everyone.

    The 'Myth of Freedom' is the best book for me, because is basic and deep at the same time.

    In Brazil we do not have many books of Trungpa Rinpoche translated and some are sold out. At the moment we only have two books in Portuguese.

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 1:35 pm

  • Irene Woodard says:

    "Never give up. Never ever give up." When things feel really really difficult, it has helped me hang in there with myself and with others...

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 1:51 pm

  • linda mockeridge says:

    M

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 2:14 pm

  • Parlan McGaw says:

    "You don't have to be afraid of who you are."

    And

    "You can do it, sweetheart!"

    Fearlessness, love, and sense of humor.

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 2:33 pm

  • Howard Klein says:

    My favorite book,lately is Crazy Wisdom. Giving more backround to the Sadhana of Mahamudra and talking about the life of Padmasambhava and the Padmasambhava principle.

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 2:45 pm

  • Michael Cherry says:

    It's hard to choose, but I guess my favorite Trungpa book would be Meditation in Action. It's elegant and direct, and it contains the seeds of the later works.

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 3:06 pm

  • Andrew Arlidge says:

    The Blue Pancake. It's actually an excerpt from the Maha Ati chapter in Journey without a goal.
    Why do I like it? Hard to say. It is both sacred and profane, and yet neither. It's humourous and serious at the same time. It's shocking and impossible for me to understand, but somehow mkaes me feel that understanding could be uncovered effortlessly.

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 3:23 pm

  • Dharma108 says:

    I chose from the quotes sent to me from time to time. I connect with this one as this awareness has helped cultivate even more subtle awareness of learning to accept 'things' as they are.

    FREEZING THE SPACE

    Someone is walking toward us -- suddenly we freeze. Not only do we freeze ourselves, but we also freeze the space in which the person is walking toward us. We call him "friend" who is walking through this space or "enemy." Thus the person is automatically walking through a frozen situation of fixed ideas -- "this is that" or "this is not that." This is what Buddha called "wrong view." It is a conceptualized view which is imperfect because we do not see the situation as it is.

    From "The Eightfold Path," in The Myth of Freedom and the Way of Meditation, pages 118 to 119 in the Shambhala Library edition.

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 3:52 pm

  • Diane Metzger says:

    "Never give up on anyone." From what I saw of him and have heard about him, that was how he was with everyone.

    "You could cheer up."

    Trungpa Rinpoche profoundly lived everything he taught, with his whole being. I think that's what makes his words echo so profoundly over the years.

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 4:20 pm

  • mia angela barbera says:

    "You have no choice, Therefore it's recommended" CTR

    "The bad news is you’re falling through the air, nothing to hang on to, no parachute. The good news is there’s no ground." CTR

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 4:41 pm

  • Steven says:

    My new favorite quote I lifted from another comment:

    “The bad news is you’re falling through the air, nothing to hang on to, no parachute. The good news is there’s no ground.”

    I like it because as a child, as children do, I had falling dreams. Even initially, I rather enjoyed them because there was enough fear or excitement in them that I'd wake up. It was thrilling - the power of imagination, of dreams.

    Eventually I realized that I was safe - there was no ground - and I would enjoy the drop. These rapidly transformed into wonderful flying dreams, soaring high over the earth, or very low and fast, inches above the surface, terrain following like a jet, or through the skyscrapers of NYC, out over the ocean, or maneuvering in the grand canyon.

    So that quote immediately brought to mind these experiences - and the transformational power in such experience.

    And that made me think of Shambala: The way of the Warrior - which was my planned response for the drawing.

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 5:09 pm

  • priyankar says:

    Meditation is not.....getting used to is......

    I follow venerable trugpa for his wisdom...and having his books will allow me to get a glimpse of the living master...within all of us through his words....

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 5:28 pm

  • Candace Asher says:

    When I first learned mindfulness meditation I was a student at the Shambala Institute in NYC. I can't shape the exact way he imparted this teaching at one of his lectures there about cultivating a warrior's heart, but his brilliance went something like this: The warrior's open heart feels like it is a piece of bleeding, raw meat.

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 6:08 pm

  • Linda Mockeridge says:

    I attempted earlier but my phone dropped. My first book, the one that led me to Shambhala was Shambhala:Sacred Path of the Warrior. The quote that caught my attention and still echoes in my mind is "The key to warriorship and the first principle of Shambhala vision is not being afraid of who you are." I came and continue....Thank you, Chogyam Trunpa, Rinpoche as the GES shines!

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 6:34 pm

  • Zahra Talan says:

    I really like Work Sex and Money, because I finally see the point in working with them. I also see that I could actually could engage with them, instead of trying to ignore them.

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 7:09 pm

  • Richard Wahl says:

    I started reading Chogyam Trungpa in 1987, with Meditation on Action my first book. Trungpa changed my understanding of dharma in ways that I'm still trying to figure out.

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 7:29 pm

  • Jessie says:

    Certainly cannot pick one. Just pure love and appreciation for every utterance. Please enter me in the drawing! Thanks for these precious treats.

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 7:33 pm

  • James M. Dupree says:

    My favorite quote is: “The bad news is you’re falling through the air, nothing to hang on to, no parachute. The good news is there’s no ground.”

    For me that single quote sums up the dharma teaching in one swift stroke.

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 7:52 pm

  • Barb says:

    These nuggets of wisdon from CTR via the web keep me going....

    Posted on March 25, 2011 at 8:15 pm

  • Jacqueline Miller says:

    "The basic approach to understanding the mind is a process of gradually making friends with oneself. That is the first step." from Chapter 2, Recollecting the Mind in THE PATH IS THE GOAL, CTR.

    Whatever amount of practice, knowledge, accumulation one does, constant underlying friendliness is the only way to work with all.

    Posted on March 26, 2011 at 1:07 am

  • Michele says:

    Thank you

    Posted on March 26, 2011 at 2:38 am

  • Alex says:

    "So the basic sharpness of awareness binds gentleness and fearlessness to create a warriors world of vast but appreciative perception." From Shambhala.

    Gentle fearlessness also build trust in relationships.

    Posted on March 26, 2011 at 3:38 am

  • Susan Shaw says:

    I fell in love with Chogyam Trungpa in 1979 at an ATS when I was a very new practitioner. I couldn't understand a word of dharma back then but when Rinpoche used the word "eyebulbs" in place of "eyeballs", my heart surrendered to him and the dharma and I was caught by his playfulness and profundity.

    Posted on March 26, 2011 at 3:59 am

  • Sharon Gamsby says:

    In the early 90's I was in a world of self created emotional distress, a marriage that didn't fit, a marijuana habit..I was reading all types of religious and self help books, but the one I related to most strongly was “Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior”..when Trungpa talked about being and living a genuine, authentic life..I knew I was not, and that it was something I wanted, but felt so up against the walls of pain of my own choosing. It took me several years to clear out the most obvious obstacles, but then I started going to the Shambhala center closest to me (2 hours away). There I was encouraged by a kind teacher to go to a month long Dathun with Pema Chodron at Gampo Abbey (and took refuge with her). Since then I have been actively involved in administrating the local Bodhi Path Buddhist center where I live, for the last 11 years. I have been totally sober for 16 or so years, and directly set onto the path by the vision that Chogyum Trungpa sent as a lifeline to happiness..from a living hell to a genuine, authentic, peaceful life.

    Posted on March 26, 2011 at 4:08 am

  • Marion says:

    My favorite book by Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche is Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism....I had been a practitioner for many years before I heard of this book, and bought it thinking, reading this book would be a good idea because it can point out any self-deception and/or delusions I am having, and having these gliches pointed out to me (by studying his book) I felt that I could then be a better practitioner! And surely this is one of those books, whatever random page one opens it to, amazingly, speaks to right where you are! Thus, this is my favorite, but he had so many Words of Wisdom. As a transcriber of Dharma teachings, and thus a listener to many teachings, I can thus appreciate an amazing teacher when I hear and/or read his words...Yay CTR!

    Posted on March 26, 2011 at 4:19 am

  • Melissa says:

    “The bad news is you’re falling through the air, nothing to hang on to, no parachute.

    The good news is there’s no ground.”

    I also really love the meaning of this quote; ultimate methaphor for going with the flow and the relief that it offers.

    Posted on March 26, 2011 at 4:28 am

  • Jude Robison says:

    In the first talk from the Crazy Wisdom Seminar II, there is an exchange on hopelessness that invokes the magic of how the Druk Sakyong invited us to go beyond concept. Thank you for the Ocean of Dharma reminders of that wisdom.

    Posted on March 26, 2011 at 5:21 am

  • David Rook says:

    Very difficult to select a favorite book by Trungpa. Based upon how I share the wisdom of Trungpa with people beginning their search - I most frequently recommend: The Myth of Freedom and Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior.

    Posted on March 26, 2011 at 5:30 am

  • Susan Ross says:

    I can hear Rinpoche almost everyday, whispering in my ear - "You can do it, sweetheart."

    Posted on March 26, 2011 at 6:21 am

  • Steve Sachs says:

    "Appreciating the details of life begins to open up our life so that it is no longer purely a struggle but a jolly good life. "

    Letting go of struggle as we relax in nowness.

    Posted on March 26, 2011 at 6:31 am

  • Kathy Wakeham says:

    Everything that he wrote held wisdom, such as

    "Bluntness is the notion of openness." from Journey Without Goal.

    and

    "keep a continual sitting practice ..." from many of his talks.

    Posted on March 26, 2011 at 7:13 am

  • Donna Shove says:

    While visiting the Shambhala Center in Colorado, I came upon this quote, which, in this short stanza, presented not only a glimpse into many great afflictions, but also countered with an anecdote. Indeed, very "Timely."

    Timely Rain
    By Chogye Trungpa Rinpoche

    In the jungles of flaming ego,
    May there be cool iceberg of bodhichitta.
    On the racetrack of bureaucracy,
    May there be the walk of the elephant.
    May the sumptuous castle of arrogance,
    Be destroyed by vajra confidence.
    In the garden of gentle sanity,
    May you be bombarded with coconuts
    Of wakefulness.

    Posted on March 26, 2011 at 7:51 am

  • Athanasios Drakopoulos says:

    BE GRATEFUL TO EVERYONE

    Without this world we cannot attain enlightenment. There would be no journey. So in a sense all the things taking place around the world, all the irritations and all the problems, are crucial. In other words, we could say that if there is no noise outside during our sitting practice, we cannot develop mindfulness. If we do not have aches and pains in our body, we cannot attain mindfulness; we cannot actually meditate. If everything were lovey-dovey, there would be nothing to work with. Without others and the challenges they present, we would have no chance at all to develop beyond ego. So the idea here is to feel grateful that others are presenting us with tremendous obstacles. Without them, we could not follow the path at all.

    From "Transformation of Bad Circumstances," in TRAINING THE MIND and Cultivating Loving-Kindness, compiled from pages 48-50 of the Shambhala Classic Edition.
    I feel the truth of that statement and at the same time I keep forgetting it...I hope I will embody it in my lifetime...Amen

    Posted on March 26, 2011 at 9:13 am

  • Jesse Bernardo says:

    My Favorite literary piece by Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche is Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism. in it he describes the beauty of a singular object and how we can become overidden with desire to obtain more and more objects, the need to build credential's for ourselves, within our practice and within our community. And that this perception is the antithesis of what we are trying to realize. That this way of thinking clouds ourselves as individual, as practicioners, and as a community. sometimes the best object is the one which is not seen, but experienced and absorbed completely. If I were to become the "winner" of this contest, I would donate these books to my local library. So that I could help turn the wheel of the Dharma and allow persons to experience Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoches eternal wisdom and light heartedness.

    Posted on March 26, 2011 at 9:26 am

  • George says:

         “Too often, people think that solving the world's problems is based on conquering the earth, rather than touching the earth, touching ground.”

    I like this because I am a professional problem solver and it reminds me to contemplate a problem rather than attack it.

    Posted on March 26, 2011 at 9:32 am

  • Clifford Garstang says:

    "Too often, people think that solving the world's problems is based on conquering the earth, rather than touching the earth, touching ground."

    I like it because it's simple and speaks to everyone, regardless of beliefs.

    Posted on March 26, 2011 at 9:32 am

  • Amy says:

    Funny... the shambhala.org website says parinirvana day is April 4, not April 5. ?

    Posted on March 26, 2011 at 9:47 am

  • Delany says:

    Q: What happens to the monkey when he takes a little LSD or peyote?
    A: He has already taken it.

    from Cutting through Spiritual Materialism

    First thing that came to mind! Cheers :)

    Posted on March 26, 2011 at 11:32 am

  • Anita Bermont says:

    From 'The Heart of the Buddha'....
    Taking refuge in the Dharma, taking a passionless approach, means that all of life is regarded as a fertile situation and a learning situation always. Whatever occurs-pain or pleasure, good or bad, justice or injustice-is part of the learning process. So there is nothing to blame; everything is the path, everything is Dharma.

    These words invite me to meet the arising moment with some ease and with that, more skillful choices and kindness.

    Posted on March 26, 2011 at 12:06 pm

  • Erin says:

    Wow, what a blessing! I've just had the most wonderful infusion of Rinpoche's energy in reading this collection of comments on readers' favorite quotes. Such richness!
    I especially love the books Training The Mind & Cultivating Lovingkindness and Smile at Fear.
    I too love so many quotes, but what comes to mind in this moment is "Love of truth puts you on the spot."
    Thanks for this beautiful shower of blessings! And Carolyn, heartful thanks for all your work in continuing to spread Rinpoche's wisdom.

    Posted on March 26, 2011 at 2:55 pm

  • Nikki Dydyna says:

    I am currently rereading "Training the Mind and
    Cultivating Loving-Kindness",the 4th slogan to pause,notice & let go is very helpful to me.
    Thank you for this opportunity to enter this drawing to possibly receive this amazing set of books.

    Posted on March 26, 2011 at 2:58 pm

  • Robyn Traill says:

    Death is the desolate experience in which our habitual patterns cannot continute as we would like them to. Our habitual patterns cease to function. A new force, a new energy takes over which is "deathless" or discontinuity. That discontinuity is something you can not communicate with, because you cannot please that particular force. You can't make friends with it, you can't con it, you can't talk it into anything. It is extremely powerful and uncompromising.

    VCTR "Crazy Wisdom"

    I can rarely even think of Rinpoche without tears. This is just a random choice of quote. The degree to which we are working with overcoming habitual patterns is the degree to which we are relating to death. Given this teaching its no wonder Khenpo Rinpoche (KTGR) feels the way he does about Trungpa Rinpoche.

    Posted on March 27, 2011 at 1:42 am

  • Jennifer Humphreys says:

    It's hard to choose, but Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior is probably the most influential for me. I have the pocket-sized version and I carry it in my bag. When I have a few moments, I open it and read a section. It always feels new and applicable no matter how many times I've seen it before. Each time I do this it makes me feel more present and genuine.

    Posted on March 27, 2011 at 6:03 am

  • Ellen Mains says:

    "First, let us look at ourselves. If you put one hundred percent of your heart into facing yourself, then you connect with this unconditional goodness. Whereas, if you only put fifty percent into the situation, you are trying to bargain with the situation, and nothing very much will happen."

    This quote from "Smile at Fear" is currently one of my favorites. Reading through many of the blog entries, a similar message seems to be repeated over and over again -- but I love the "100%"-ness of this one! Thank you.

    Posted on March 27, 2011 at 6:39 am

  • Andrew Safer says:

    "Good luck, Sir!"

    The way Rinpoche said it, I love the combination of irony, humour, confidence, celebration, and mischievousness.

    Posted on March 27, 2011 at 8:56 am

  • John Horner says:

    The closest to my heart is the Torch of Certainty. I am a student of Lama Norlha Rinpoche, and we use this book as our root teaching. It is a solid base for our study and understanding.
    Thank You

    Posted on March 27, 2011 at 9:44 am

  • william says:

    I like the way he could stop your mind with a glance or that silly thing he did with his eyebrows

    Posted on March 27, 2011 at 9:56 am

  • Ken Friedman says:

    My favourite saying:

    "It's my duty to inform you that it's hopeless."— from private interview in Lake Louise, Canada (1981) -- in response to my life as I had known it falling apart -- the expression on VCTR's face and his tone of voice as he said this (as well as the words) are with me every day.

    Posted on March 27, 2011 at 12:32 pm

  • DalaLuz says:

    It's impossible to pick just one, but I've been really inspired by Rinpoche's teachings on the 6 realms, which helped me bring it so much closer to my understanding

    Posted on March 27, 2011 at 12:43 pm

  • Dale says:

    Thinking of my favorite quote reminded me of The Sacred Path of the Warrior. I recalled the time my teacher pointed out the basic fundamental of the path: not being afraid of oneself. Trungpa Rinpoche also says,

    "When you don't punish or condemn yourself, when you relax more and appreciate your body and mind, you begin to contact the fundamental notion of basic goodness in yourself. So it is extremely important to be willing to open yourself to yourself. Developing tenderness towards yourself allows you to see both your problems and your potential accurately."

    Thank you!

    Posted on March 27, 2011 at 2:38 pm

  • Tanya says:

    I cannot pick just one book or one quote. They all have something to offer me in my quest for achieving enlightnement. Each one helps me understand myself and my purpose in this world. I wish everyone could read these and look into themselves rather than out toward the materialistic society we live in.

    Posted on March 27, 2011 at 3:06 pm

  • Tashi Tsetso says:

    My heart of full of gratitude, looking over the vast collection of teachings by Chogyam Tungpa Rinpoche, it is close to impossible to choose one
    saying or book over another. It depends of the day, and what is needed... We are so lucky to have access to such a wealth of knowledge and truth.

    Posted on March 27, 2011 at 7:20 pm

  • John Morecock says:

    "Good, bad, happy, sad, all thoughts vanish into emptiness like the imprint of a bird in the sky."

    Posted on March 27, 2011 at 9:05 pm

  • Cynthia says:

    many favorites, but of the famous one-liners i would say "Not afraid to be a fool." why? because it points to the possibility of being more open and courageous, even outrageous. and it is a good, pithy reminder of what it is that stops us from acting genuinely - ego's fear of looking foolish.

    Posted on March 27, 2011 at 9:38 pm

  • Dan says:

    Favorite book is “Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior” and I read "Ocean of Dharma" almost everyday.

    Posted on March 28, 2011 at 3:04 am

  • cesar says:

    i really reading enjoyed this:

    You see the teachings are not really like "do-it-yourself" books. They do not go through every point down to the last detail. They just indicate, give hints. The teachings are an awakening process to rouse you to the situation, rather than a compendium of step-by-step, specific guidance. The teachings give hints, and you are inspired to go out and develop them. Then you find that you can do it. That is the whole process. Spontaneity and basic intelligence become extremely important. They begin to function independently when the confusions begin to arise. That is what is meant by the notion of the universal guru.

    one of my favorite stories my teacher told me was about Rinpoche at a wedding ceremony and just blessing the bride & groom, back and forth saying to each, "pain is not punishment, pleasure is not a reward." i thought this was a beautiful blessing.

    thank you Rinpoche,
    cesar

    Posted on March 28, 2011 at 3:20 am

  • Frederic Villemure says:

    "For the dignified Shambhala person,
    an unwaning authentic presence dawns".

    Apparently the more literal translation of the Tibetan "wangtang" would be "field of power". Thank goodness for the Dorje Dradul's gift with languages: his choice of the expression "authentic presence" has so much power and relaxation, so much depth and simplicity. It is by itself a transmission of authentic presence!

    Ca va?

    Posted on March 28, 2011 at 7:13 am

  • Mark Szpakowski says:

    "Open space cannot be perceived by otherwise at all."

    This totally zapped me when I heard it (10 Bhumis seminar at RMDC, 1972). Trungpa Rinpoche just loved playing with language, and his speech would just fall into these delicious funny and illuminating aphorisms that opened you beyond any concepts or emotions you could hold on to.

    Posted on March 28, 2011 at 7:40 am

  • Caro says:

    I always have The Pocket Chogyam Trungpa in my car, in a pocket, in a bag. Reading #78, "The Environment Around the Breath".....
    Breath is the object of meditation, but the environment around the
    breath is also a part of the meditative situation.

    Posted on March 28, 2011 at 8:34 am

  • Joanna Bolek says:

    When asked about how to relate to hell realms, VCTR responded (chuckling), when I'm in a hell realm I try to stay there as long as I can. (something to that effect...I believe he said it at a program in Boulder, although I don't recall which one.) Often, when I'm in difficult situations, I think of his response.

    Posted on March 28, 2011 at 8:45 am

  • Lara Hill says:

    A favorite comment (I've saved so many by now!) is this one because it helps solve the "problem of self" that is so central to Buddhist thought, not in an annihilating way, but respectfully:

    THE ENLIGHTENED EXPRESSION OF YOURSELF

    We try to avoid our individuality, but that is a big problem. Individuality sometimes comes out of ego, like wanting to be an emperor, a king, or a millionaire. But individuality can also come from personal inspiration. It depends on the level of one's journey, on how far you have been able to shed your ego. We all have our own style and our own particular nature. We can't avoid it. The enlightened expression of yourself is in accord with your inherent nature.

    Posted on March 28, 2011 at 9:08 am

  • Paul J. Amell says:

    Another auspicious quote today, thank you very much.

    Posted on March 28, 2011 at 9:23 am

  • M Gouka says:

    My favourite quote is from "Shambhala : la voie sacrée du guerrier- the sacred path of the warrior". Sorry for those who cannot read french but I do not have the official english version of the following from this marvellous book : "Nous avons effectivement vaincu aussi bien l'ambition que le sentiment d'être démuni". freely translated by : " we have indeed defeated ambition but we do not feel powerless"
    I think I will find out why this particular phrase sounds so true to me...
    This phrase comes and goes in my mind and gives me so much positive energy to continue my own way.

    Posted on March 28, 2011 at 9:25 am

  • Helen Green says:

    Be kind - kind to ourselves, kind to others, always. Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche manifested what he encouraged in others.

    Posted on March 28, 2011 at 9:44 am

  • Jack Boyce says:

    "Real fearlessness is the product of tenderness. It comes from letting the world tickle your heart, your raw and beautiful heart. You are willing to open up, without resistance or shyness, and face the world. You are willing to share your heart with others."

    Shambhala, The Sacred Path of the Warrior, turned my preconceptions inside out is best description, discussing basic human bravery, and the goodness of being alive, gave my fairly new meditation practice a new context.

    Posted on March 28, 2011 at 9:53 am

  • Ziji Goren says:

    My favorite phrase was offered one winter dawn in
    Boulder, 1980. "FEARLESS HUMILITY" evoked a spring of tears that traveled down my cheeks. The two words seemed unlikely partners. Wasn't it fearless
    action or quiet humility? Until fearless humility
    dawned on me in that moment standing near Rinpoche.

    Posted on March 28, 2011 at 9:53 am

  • Bob Gillespie says:

    "There are no guarantees, because there is no guarantor."

    CTR from the Dathun letter

    Posted on March 28, 2011 at 9:53 am

  • Ziska Riemann says:

    "You don’t have to believe everything you think." I like this saying of Chögyam Trungpa because it makes me laugh and it's true.

    Posted on March 28, 2011 at 10:04 am

  • George Marshall says:

    In an early talk, the boss said the following:

    When things are going well enjoy that. And when things are not going well enjoy that too.

    I remember thinking how can we do that: enjoy it when things are not going well.

    I can hear his answer now,

    "just do it!"

    Posted on March 28, 2011 at 10:22 am

  • Roger Guest says:

    I think the saying I like the most at this moment is: "Sometimes it is really hot and dry and there is thunder but it still doesn't rain."
    This remark was made in the context of a talk on expectations, and it reminds me that things are never entirely predictable.

    Posted on March 28, 2011 at 10:42 am

  • rose mcgowan says:

    Try as I might I can't find the quote that most impressed me. It was about the practice being for not withdrawing into the self from everyday situations.See I can't even say it right. I wrote it down but have lost it. If anyone can tell me which page of which book it was in I would like to share that one.

    Posted on March 28, 2011 at 10:56 am

  • Shelley Heinz says:

    There are untold numbers of fantastic quotes but the one I have probably repeated more than any other is (and it might not be exact) "Got a flat tire? Have a picnic."
    It is so easy to de-rail when things fall apart and this is a wonderful reminder to take a moment and view the situation from a different perspective.

    Posted on March 28, 2011 at 11:02 am

  • tomas says:

    I have two quotes from Trungpa Rinpoche that touch me so deeply.

    Here is one that reminds me to rejoice in the bitter-sweet flavor of life...

    Fearlessness is powerful, but it also contains gentleness and constant loneliness and sadness.

    When you are more fearless, you become more available and kinder to others, more considerate of others and more touched by them.

    The more fearlessness evolves, that much more available and vulnerable you become.

    That is why sadness and gentleness are part of fearlessness.

    Here is the second one, with a resonant theme:

    The sadness is a key point, ladies and gentlemen. In the back of your head, you hear a beautiful flute playing, because you are so sad. At the same time, the melody cheers you up. You are not at the bottom of the barrel of the world or in the Black Hole of Calcutta.
    In spite of being sad and devastated, there is something lovely taking place. There is some smile, some beauty. In the Shambhala world, we call that daringness. In the Buddhist language, we call it compassion. Daringness is sympathetic to oneself. There is no suicidal sadness involved at all. Rather, there is a sense of big, open mind in dealing with others, which is beautiful, wonderful. We find ourselves shedding tears at the same time that we are smiling. We are crying and laughing all at once.
    That is the ideal Shambhala mentality: we cry and we smile at the same time. Isn't it wonderful?
    A flower needs sunshine together with raindrops to blossom so beautifully. For that matter, a rainbow is made out of the tears falling from our eyes, mixed with a shot of sunshine. That is how a rainbow becomes a rainbow - sunshine mixed with our tears. From that point of view, the Shambhala philosophy is the philosophy of a rainbow.

    Posted on March 28, 2011 at 11:21 am

  • Lyn Ciampa says:

    "In post meditation, be a child of illusion"
    This quote describes, to me, what the the gift of liberation would feel like.

    I get the same feeling of promise from the Rinpoche's photography.

    Posted on March 28, 2011 at 11:44 am

  • Kolin Yardley says:

    Quote by Trungpa Rinpoche
    " As long as one's approach to spirituality is based upon enriching ego, then it is spiritual materialism, a suicidal process rather than a creative one."

    Seeing Trungpa Rinpoche in person, made me aware that many Spiritual Paths, that I was involved with, were Spiritual Materialism.

    Posted on March 28, 2011 at 12:16 pm

  • Joshua Paul says:

    One of my favorite quotes of Chogyam Trungpa is one of the shortest: "Hope and fear cannot alter the season."

    The direct relevance of this quote, in my life, is in how it pertains to equanimity. It reminds me of something that I am so forgetful about: That all of my ups and downs, emotional and otherwise, are even more fleeting than the seasons (and not quite as beautiful, either!).

    Posted on March 28, 2011 at 12:56 pm

  • PassingThrough says:

    My favorite quote is "Nobody Polishes the Sun" not only because its funny to imagine trying to polish the sun - with shielded goggles and gloves on - but also because it sparked and heated up a serious question inside my head, "What really makes the sun shine anyhow?"

    This question led me to shed some light on an answer on how to keep the sun comfortably shining here on Earth - instead of just letting the hydrogen fuel at its core run out in about 5 billion years from now.

    In my imagination, a possible solution may be that future humans will inject hydrogen fuel into the sun's core. But this brings up more heated questions like "How can we constantly create the hydrogen fuel needed to keep the sun shining nicely?" And "How can we inject this needed fuel into the sun's core!?"

    Maybe future humans will have figured out how to create another sun to replace the current and aging one. In the meantime I am currently resigned to feeling like polishing the sun can wait. The moon needs vacuuming right now.

    Posted on March 28, 2011 at 12:57 pm

  • Brian Lee Poe says:

    One of my favorite comments by His Holiness
    Chogyam Trungpa, Rinpoche, the 11th Trungpa
    tulku is, "Cheer up!" For me personally, it
    is virtually always worthy of enactment and,
    certainly, contemplation.

    May we all have peace in this world and in
    other worlds.

    Please enter me in the drawing for the
    master's words. Thank you.

    Posted on March 28, 2011 at 2:22 pm

  • Roland Cohen says:

    "Pain is not a punishment; pleasure is not a reward."
    -CTR

    I'm not sure what book or seminar this quote comes from, but I heard on authority that the Vidyadara said it! Anyone know?

    Interestingly, his friend whom he admired greatly, Suzuki Roshi, is quoted as saying: "Hell is not a punishment, it's training."

    Posted on March 28, 2011 at 3:29 pm

  • Sarah Somerville says:

    My favorite book is cutting through spiritual materialism because every time I have read it, I have learned a lot. Each reading has also been a totally unique experience because the text has a lot of layers that I have grown to understand more. It's just wonderfully genius and you can really hear chogyam trungpa's earth shattering sanity.

    Posted on March 28, 2011 at 3:51 pm

  • J says:

    My current favorite is:
    Today's quote "Movies as Eye Massage" from "Visual Dharma Film Workshop" In The Collected Works.
    I'm in the early years of Alzheimers & I find the visual stimulation of movies a release & a help in controlling wandering thoughts...massage for the brain...but ultimately just hypnosis, if overindulged in.

    I've found my last few yrs a v. valuable part of my practice. Thank you!

    Posted on March 28, 2011 at 5:16 pm

  • Aine Marron says:

    Fearful mind is the mentality of those who are still taking pleasure in hibernating in the cocoon of comfort. People come up with long lists of reasons they would like to hibernate. They complain that the world has not provided enough hospitality, so therefore they have to stay in their cocoons. Philosophers, psychologists, musicians, mathematicians, cooks, and seamstresses alike - all kinds of people with all kinds of mentalities - may have their own answers as to why they should be left in their own particular cocoons.Those of us who have left the cocoon and joined the warrior's world always treat such would-be warriors gently. We respect them, but on the other hand, we don't just let them lie in their cocoons forever. We gently take the cocooners out of their cocoons and we place them, instead, in the cradle of loving kindness.
    SMILE AT FEAR.

    I'm not part of the "we" here yet........I aspire to be. I aspire to remember the courage contained in this quote - to remember that on my most imperfect day - my basic goodness is good enough - if I can see this, I will then be able to hospitality to others.

    Posted on March 28, 2011 at 6:54 pm

  • Carl B says:

    "Do not be afraid of who you are." I believe that he began one of his Shambhala talks this way, repeating the same phrase perhaps three times, very slowly. It is like a mantra, with endless depth for contemplation.

    Posted on March 29, 2011 at 6:19 am

  • Tanya Strickland says:

    My favorite quote today is:

    "Too often, people think that solving the world's problems is based on conquering the earth, rather than touching the earth, touching ground."

    Chogyam Trungpa

    Quite simply, this reminds me that it starts with me, that all of the great changes made begin with simple acts of compassion toward the earth, toward other people, toward that which we see right before our eyes.

    Posted on March 29, 2011 at 6:35 am

  • Judy Bond says:

    As a Shambhala Art teacher and long time student of both Sakyongs, I'm especially fond of the expression "Back to square one" which the Vidyadhara didn't invent but one that he played on a lot. It is always the best advice, whether perceiving or expressing.

    Posted on March 29, 2011 at 9:34 am

  • Nora Wiser says:

    One quote I think of often is from THE SACRED PATH OF THE WARRIOR: "The important point is to realize that you are never off duty. You can never just relax, because the whole world needs help."

    On those days when I just want to run away, hide my head under a blanket and not come out, I think of these words. Then, with gentleness for myself and others, I re-engage with the world.

    Posted on March 29, 2011 at 3:07 pm

  • Cathy Doerrman says:

    "Workable" is my favorite word that I associate with Rinpoche. It is so powerful because it is so simple. Because it is simple, everyone understands it; almost immediately a situation breathes when reminded that everything is workable. It is so positive, compassionate, life affirming. It makes me smile just thinking of it. Thank you Rinpoche, I love you

    Posted on March 29, 2011 at 6:08 pm

  • Helen Douglas says:

    What a good idea for a contest - it's been wonderful to read through all the comments.

    My three favourite quotes:
    On crazy wisdom. I'm paraphrasing, but as a philosopher, this always hits the spot: "First you get wise and then you get crazy. You don't get crazy first - that's the way of a philosopher."

    The two I keep close in my heart are these: "Pain is not punishment; pleasure is not reward. Kindness, kindness, kindness!" (In the story I heard, he was thwacking a bride and groom on the head with a ceremonial fan as he said this.)

    And always:
    "That mind of fearfulness
    Should be put in the cradle of loving-kindess
    And suckled with the profound and brilliant milk of eternal doubtlessness.
    In the cool shade of fearlessness,
    Fan it with te fan of joy and happiness..." and the rest of that passage on the development of the warrior's mind. Beautiful and inspiring imagery

    Thanks

    Posted on March 29, 2011 at 9:50 pm

  • Hana Gojca says:

    Love today's quote because I love movies!!!!

    Posted on March 30, 2011 at 4:03 am

  • Annie says:

    'When you shoot your arrow, either it will hit the target or it will miss. Trust is knowing that there will be a message.
    When you trust in those messages, the reflections of the phenomenal world, the world begins to seem like a bank or reservoir of richness. You feel like you are living in a rich world, one that never runs out of messages. A problem arises only if you try to manipulate a situation to your advantage or ignore it.'
    This quote from Shambala (The Sacred Path of the Warrior) sums up , in my opinion the karma we will inherit if we follow the advice or ignore it - so this has been from my experience. All we need to know is right there . Thank you Trungpa for reminding us. Annie P Widdowson

    Posted on March 30, 2011 at 4:58 am

  • Nosh says:

    I first learned about Chögyam Trungpa’s book Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism from the Sufi Teacher Murshida Ivy Duce. She sent me a copy of the book and it transformed my life. The words of Chögyam Trungpa took me right through the doors of perception and gave me an insight to true spirituality.

    Posted on March 30, 2011 at 10:37 am

  • Robin Hall says:

    "Jolly good luck" CTR's way of saying 'I disagree'

    Posted on March 30, 2011 at 12:34 pm

  • Laurette says:

    'The action of the bodhisattva is like the moon shining on one hundred bowls of water, so that there are one hundred moons, one in each bowl ... Openness means this kind of absolute trust and self-confidence.' (from Cutting through Spiritual Materialism). I love this. It shows us how to open our learning to all possibilities, to see things outside of the box.

    Posted on March 31, 2011 at 3:23 am

  • Mark says:

    My favourite quote from Chögyam Trungpa's work is this one:

    "Since all things are naked, clear and free from obscurations
    there is nothing to attain or realize".

    Why? Because

    "We shall not cease from exploration
    And the end of all our exploring
    Will be to arrive where we started
    And know the place for the first time."

    -- as the poet (T.S. Eliot) said.

    Posted on March 31, 2011 at 3:39 am

  • Bill Karelis says:

    My favorite quote today is: "Our home is not just this planet Earth. It is our solar system." I really appreciate travel.

    Posted on March 31, 2011 at 3:40 am

  • Jay says:

    Look. This is your world! You can't not look. There is no other world. This is your world; it is your feast. You inherited this; you inherited these eyeballs; you inherited this world of color. Look at the greatness of the whole thing. Look! Don't hesitate - look! Open your eyes. Don't blink, and look, look - look further.

    Chogyam Trungpa

    Make you see out side your the box, just see with out judgment
    - Like the wind coming over the tree, We saw their dance by the moonlight,

    Posted on March 31, 2011 at 4:00 am

  • Maryli Tiemann says:

    While being honored at Harvard, Muhammad Ali was asked to recite his shortest poem. He replied,
    "Me Whee."
    My favorite Chögyam Trungpa quote is:
    "Just sit."

    Posted on March 31, 2011 at 4:31 am

  • Dylan says:

    "May I fearlessly beat the drum of the Dharma to wake sentient beings who fall asleep from desire, hatred and ignorance and deliver them to the awakened state."
    From the introduction to "Mudra."
    Love it.
    This is why we practice what we practice, why we do what we do.

    Posted on March 31, 2011 at 4:40 am

  • David Park says:

    Chogyam Trungpa's teachings vested me into Buddhism.

    Posted on March 31, 2011 at 5:07 am

  • Erika Midori Tazawa says:

    I love Beyond Spiritual Materialism, because Trungpa teach us to see how deeply we are attached to Ego idea and how Ego easily misleads us in the guise of benevolence.

    Posted on March 31, 2011 at 5:44 am

  • Mary Sherman says:

    "I think depression is one of the most powerful of all energies."


    Some of the most profound views I've ever read about emotions and depression in particular.
    From a lecture Rinpoche gave in New York in 1973 on the significance of the Lions Roar!

    Posted on March 31, 2011 at 5:45 am

  • Brian M says:

    “Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior" of course! The first and formost.Led me to meditation
    and helped me to have (as Trungpa always does) a
    completely original take on it.

    Posted on March 31, 2011 at 6:17 am

  • James Willems says:

    I believe Trungpa Rinpoche's "Cutting through Spiritual Materialism" remains one of the most important Dharma books written for the West. Ultimately the book challenges any reification of belief or authority outside of the enlightened interior Dharma Eye. Every teaching strategy is penultimate even Trungpa's work. As long as the effort expands awareness and comprehension, it is skillful. When it causes us to contract and get defensive, it is not skillful. Spiritual Materialism is the need to see the Dharma as a material reality. It is not. The Dharma is a spiritual awakening.

    Posted on March 31, 2011 at 8:02 am

  • Niibwid Rob Curtner says:

    "Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism" is my favorite because of explaining with an amazing critique how N American material culture is unconsciously brought forward into the attachment to progress on our spiritual path. The completeness of the critique and the humor and GROWTH that is offered in Cutting Through is really quite powerful. If I get the right stuff for my alter, I will be closer to insight or freedom or enlightenment. Still makes me laugh. I have given away many copies of this book since the 1970's.

    Posted on March 31, 2011 at 9:27 am

  • beartoe says:

    "there is no point in thinking that a past did exist that could we have now. this is now. this very moment. nothing mystical just now, very simple and straightforward. and from that nowness, however, arises a sense of intelligence. always. that you are constantly inter-acting with the reality one-by-one, spot-by-spot, constantly."

    from the zeitgeist movie introduction.

    Posted on March 31, 2011 at 10:13 am

  • Normand Fisher says:

    I am simply amazed every time I reread "Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior" as I have the impression of something totally new every single reading.

    Posted on March 31, 2011 at 11:50 am

  • Alice says:

    "The quickest way from point A to point B is to stay at point A"

    Posted on March 31, 2011 at 12:18 pm

  • Stephen McLeod says:

    When you can hold the suffering of the world in your heart, and yet never forget the vastness of the great Eastern sun, then you can make a proper cup of tea. (Chogyam Trungpa)

    I love the three components of this saying:
    (1) Holding the suffering of the world in your heart acknowledges the principle insight of the Buddha; that life is suffering and it must be recognized as natural and unavoidable. Don’t try to ignore it or run away any more, but hold it, feel it, shed a tear for everyone that finds themselves caught in Samsara (including yourself).
    (2) Never forget the vastness of the Great Eastern Sun acknowledges that liberation from suffering is always available. The great Eastern Sun never sets and the inherent goodness in everyone is always there. This immeasurable goodness, manifesting as Bodhisattva warriorship, transforms suffering into liberation; confusion into wisdom, night into day.
    (3) Then you can make a good cup of tea represents the final outcome – the efficiently functioning human being. Armed with the knowledge of suffering and the means of transforming it, wisdom and action become synchronised. A good cup of tea is warm and aromatic (Body), facilitates cordial interactions (Speech) and is refreshing and stimulating (Mind).

    Posted on March 31, 2011 at 12:54 pm

  • Eric Kerns says:

    Smile at fear... he showed me what a true warrior faces :-) I would love to be able to read all of his powerful teachings and share them with many :-)

    Posted on March 31, 2011 at 1:05 pm

  • Rochelle H says:

    Work, Sex and Money

    So often the trap of meditation or self development can be a type of selfish obsession with attainment of some spiritual goal. The idea that the ordinary and everyday are the place to put our ideas of spirituality into practice -that really what we need is to be in real life. Not removed from it.

    Posted on March 31, 2011 at 1:22 pm

  • rose mcgowan says:

    Since all things are naked, clear and free from obscurations, there is nothing to attain or realise.

    The everyday practice is simply to develop a complete openness to all situations and emotions.

    And to all people - experiencing everything totally without reservations and blockages, so that one never withdraws or centralises into oneself.

    Posted on March 31, 2011 at 1:59 pm

  • Craig says:

    I really enjoy, over and over again, "Meditation in action".
    It was one of the first books I read by Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche and I continue to pick it up and re-read some or all of it.
    Sometimes I feel like I lose sight of the path and that book seems to clarify the reasons that I sit and meditate.
    It's not to light and it's not to heavy, it's just right for me, now and again.
    Cheers.

    Posted on March 31, 2011 at 3:48 pm

  • Rafael Rendeiro says:

    My favorite book is Shambhala, the warrior path (don't know if it's the correct title, I'm brazilian). I like it because it simply presents a way to change your life in a better way.

    Posted on March 31, 2011 at 3:49 pm

  • Clarissa Stanley says:

    "Genuine Art-dharma art-is simply the activity of non-aggression"

    what a gift to this world

    Posted on March 31, 2011 at 5:27 pm

  • James Elliott says:

    The most memorable quotes from Trungpa Rinpoche often happened during questions at talks. It seemed sometimes it was during that interaction with students he could best manifest what he was talking about. So many, but two jump to mind:

    1. From "The Four Foundations of Mindfullness" talk given at 1973 Seminary, found in "The Heart of the Buddha",during questions about the play between external reality (inevitably dualistic hence neurotic) and internal or spiritual reality. This shows a view that encompasses the most neurotic up to the highest realization all contained within a compassionate understanding of the human condition:

    Q: According to that model, how would meditation practice effort affect the relationship between mind and the world it's doing battle with?

    Trungpa Rinpoche: The purpose of meditation practice is to try to save oneself from psychosis.

    Q: But you still maintain the world? You still maintain the neurotic state, basically?

    Trungpa Rinpoche: Not that necessarily, either. There is an alternative mind that does not need the neurotic world. This is where the idea of enlightenment comes in. (etc.)

    2. From "Transcending Madness; The Experience of the Six Bardos" second talk "The Six Realms of Being", showing his playfullness with students, while transmitting teachings, both practical and profound.

    Q: Rinpoche, are you going to discuss ego at all during this seminar?

    Trungpa Rinpoche: I suppose that subject will pop up. (Laughter)

    Q: Rinpoche, you said that you can't get out of a situation, you have to get completely into it.

    Trungpa Rinpoche: You have to be completely fearless. And there should be communication with the ground you're standing on. If you are in complete touch with that nowness of the ground, then all the other situations are automatically definite and obvious.

    Q: Which world are you in now?

    Trungpa Rinpoche: Woof, woof.

    Q: But you said these are not states of the awakened mind - they are only confusion!

    Trungpa Rinpoche: Yes, confusion. Sure. (Laughter)

    Posted on March 31, 2011 at 8:47 pm

  • Márcio Burnett says:

    I'm not that familiar with the work of Chögyam Trungpa. In fact, I've never read one of his books. But I've subscribed to Ocean of Dharma Quotes, and I'm constantly amazed by his wisdom, and his ability to make the teachings accessible to us poor souls lost in this crazy modern world.

    Posted on April 1, 2011 at 12:46 am

  • Ann DeVries says:

    Like some of the comments above, I love all of Trunpa's writings. Here's one that stands out very much, because it sums up both the view on meditation and the enlightened way of being:

    "The whole idea of meditation is to develop an entirely different way of dealing with things, where you have no purpose at all. In fact, meditation is dealing the question of whether or not there is such a thing as purpose. And when one learns a different way of dealing with the situation, one no longer has to have a purpose. One is not on the way to somewhere. Or rather, one is on the way and one is also at the destination at the same time. That is what meditation is for." (Meditation in Action, p 120)

    Posted on April 1, 2011 at 1:21 am

  • Jenifer Strauss says:

    My favorite of CTR's books is 'Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism'. I have read it alone, with Sangha, and alone again. Each time, the material provides new understandings, almost like encountering it for the first time again. It is just like the cushion...each time we sit down to meditate, it is like the first time!

    Posted on April 1, 2011 at 1:56 am

  • Walker Blaine says:

    "Dharma cannot be known without meditative training."

    This was one of the first statements by Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche that I wrote down for myself to think about over 20 years ago. It is in his early seminary teachings. The phrase has come back to me many times because it is the honest truth; there is no way to get to the heart of who we are without taking the time to look.

    Posted on April 1, 2011 at 4:55 am

  • Dirk Henn says:

    "No big deal."
    I never found a way more shortly and directly reminding me of staying within this very moment without exaggerating any aspect of it. What ever it might be.

    Posted on April 1, 2011 at 5:50 am

  • Kerry Kelly says:

    The quote that is coming to mind at the moment; I think it might be from the book Illusion's Game; Trungpa Rinpoche puts his hand on his chest and says something like "This has no name." Continuing he points his finger outwards and says "That is ego." This quote, to me, has a lot of power to suddenly awake us and remind us how our minds work.

    Posted on April 1, 2011 at 11:04 am

  • Madeline Bruser McGaw says:

    My favorite saying from Trungpa Rinpoche is, "You can do it, sweetheart." When I remember his voice saying it, it says it all - that we are basically good, that his love and devotion toward us are infinitely powerful and sweet, and that he believed in us "200%." It also speaks of his unshakeable conviction that not only his students but all beings are basically good. Whenever I need fuel to keep going on my warrior's journey, that single memory of him saying "You can do it, sweetheart" goes straight to my heart and raises my lungta. He is alive in that moment, and the world lights up with the energy of the Great Eastern Sun.

    Posted on April 1, 2011 at 12:34 pm

  • Mike Williamson says:

    Favorite quote today from my favoite book,The Pocket Chogyam Trungpa p139 is: "The more dissatisfaction, the more questions and more doubts there are, the healthier it is, for we are no longer sucked into ego-oriented situations, but we are constantly woken up." This little book can travel with me and each page provides a different bit of wisdom that can orient and re-orient me day after day toward basic sanity.

    Posted on April 1, 2011 at 8:23 pm

  • Mark says:

    “Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior”

    Simply, inspired me to be a warrior.

    And still continues to do so.

    Posted on April 2, 2011 at 2:57 am

  • Marcela says:

    Listening to Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche in his talks I feel the little dog in the old R.C.A Victor's logo. He nourishes me without fail. All his quotes rescue the deep meaning of buddhist teachings from shallow interpretation. His book Trascending Madness changed my world, my View, affected my practice deeply. I owe him and thank him for this. Let it be for the benefit of all.

    Posted on April 2, 2011 at 4:00 am

  • margo O'Malleyll says:

    The Gift

    Recently rummaging in long forgotten files...came upon an article in a 1987 copy of Yoga Journal...last page, Chogyam Trungpa's "The Gift of Dissapointment"

    His perfect words for just that moment....delivered directly into my heart with such warmth, clarity and depth of understanding...
    thanks, ever thanks.

    Posted on April 2, 2011 at 9:08 am

  • Rex Robertson says:

    Not sure where this quote came from, or it is even canonical, but it was quoted recently: "Don't pull the tongue until the head is done." Or something similar.

    "Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism" and "The Myth of Freedom" were some of the first books of CTR I read years ago, and again recently. Timeless lessons.

    Posted on April 2, 2011 at 12:43 pm

  • Lawrence (Enzo) Pettener says:

    "You don't need to be stuck in being deprived or in hatred"; it's not an exact quote, but the two active words are definitely those: deprived and hatred. I've needed to actively use that one like a Lojong slogan in my everyday life, and it's been so useful; crucial, even. I can't remember which book it's in.

    I love the parachute/groundlessness one quoted above too, near the top.

    Posted on April 3, 2011 at 3:45 am

  • Jennifer Woodhull says:

    "You don't have to be afraid of who you are." I wasn't there, but I'm told that the Vidyadhara made this statement in San Francisco, during his last public talk. Legend has it that he urged his listeners to remember these words, even if they forgot anything else he had ever told them——and this after having passed on the most esoteric, exquisite teachings of Tibetan Buddhism. "You don't have to be afraid of who you are." It seems to me that this single, blunt statement pretty much sums up everything he taught us. I had it printed on the back of the business cards I use for my counselling practice, and they never fail to stop people's minds. They still stop mine.

    Posted on April 3, 2011 at 8:57 am

  • Jack Salamone says:

    One quote after another and here is one of my favorites from the end of the "Perception" chapter from "Glimpses of Abhidharma" Rinpoche says this in response to a question.....
    "You see the teachings are not really like "do-it-yourself" books. They do not go through every point down to the last detail. They just indicate,
    give hints. The teachings are an awakening process to rouse you to the situation, rather than a compendium of step-by-step guidance. The teaching gives hints, and you are inspired to go out and develop them. Then you find that you can do it. That is the whole process. Spontaniety and basic intelligence become extremely important. They begin to function independently when the confusions begin to arise. That is what is meant by the notion of universal guru." Thank you everyday Rinpoche for your vast and profound teachings and for the confidence you have in your students.

    Posted on April 3, 2011 at 6:34 pm

  • Tharpa Gyatso (R.F) says:

    Dear Rinpoche,
    Thank you for this, your endless mandala of body speech and mind that still echoes and trembles in all who entered and re-enter your center and fringe. This "little thingy," this Ocean of Dharma Quote of the Week
    Could it be that all on this list have been touched by your mind, your heat, your love and realize that it is now impossible not to follow your example when you proclaimed:

    "I knew I must surrender to the dance
    And join the circle of Dakinis.
    Like the confluence of two rivers,
    EH the feminine and VAM the male,
    Meeting in the circle of the Dance." ???

    May we all follow you in

    "Joining my rhythm in the dance,
    Joining with the stillness, the most dignified movement of them all."

    --From "The Perfect Love Poem"
    read by Carolyn Rose Gimian (yes, audio!) at:

    http://www.chronicleproject.com/stories_120.html

    Posted on April 3, 2011 at 9:12 pm

  • Edmund says:

    "Somebody became Buddha"

    Enlightenment is no longer a myth or concept, but something that actually did take place. It did happen-I think that is the basis of our conviction.

    Posted on April 3, 2011 at 9:21 pm

  • flore slob-berkvens says:

    my favourite quote, which is very meaningful to me is:
    You don't stop the anger, you just are the anger.(......) The Tibetan expression for
    that is: rang sar shak, which means "leave it in its own place." Let anger be in its own place.
    it comes from:

    Take A Deep Breath!
    LET ANGER BE IN ITS OWN PLACE

    Student: If I'm angry, instead of either expressing or suppressing my
    anger, how can I just relate to it? Should I stop the anger and just
    relate to the thought process?

    Chogyam Trungpa: You don't stop the anger, you just are the anger.
    Anger just hangs out as it is. That is relating with the anger. Then
    the anger becomes vivid and directionless, and it diffuses into
    energy. The idea of relating with the emotion has nothing to do with
    expressing yourself to the other person. The Tibetan expression for
    that is rang sar shak, which means "leave it in its own place." Let
    anger be in its own place.

    From "Death and the Sense of Experience" in CRAZY WISDOM, pages 137 to 138.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 2:15 am

  • Ann says:

    I am most struck, as well as delighted, to come to a new understanding of the term "bardo." It speaks to everything that I try to live -- awareness, presence, compassion in the now of my life. To discover that its essence of "between the two" in this new way is quite a wonderful revelation. It can be said that we are always in the midst of past and present, and bardo is so much more than between this realm and the next. As a thanatologist I am so pleased to know this, and well understand the ramifications of living the best possible nowness.

    Gratefully,
    Ann

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 2:27 am

  • Mark Fischler says:

    "Meditation is working with our speed, our restlessness, our constant busyness. Meditation provides space or ground in which restlessness might function, might have room to be restless, might relax by seeing restless. If we do not interfere with restlessness, then restlessness becomes part of space. We do not control or attack the desire to catch the tail" The Myth of Freedom Page 48.

    I love this quite because I see how my mind is so restless and always will be in a certain sense. But Trungpa is reminding me to not resist it. Don't control it and then watch what happens. The self contraction always relaxes when I hear these words.

    Yours in vision of Shambhala,
    Mark Fischler

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 2:44 am

  • Lynda says:

    'What do we say when we say a patient has been healed? to be healed ironically means a person is no more embarrassed by life; she is able to face death without resentment or expectation'

    Delightful,apt, and one I keep close, both in my day at work - and my own somewhat embarrassed heart!

    It is from 'The Heart of the Buddha'

    Best wishes to all
    Lynda

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 2:46 am

  • nicole wolf gilbert says:

    Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism cracked my shell like no other book -- by reading it, I knew something about life and death that resonated beyond any of the words themselves -- I see now, it was a turning point in my life. I was no longer so completely ashamed of my humanness.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 2:47 am

  • Ania says:

    "Fundamentally, every one of us feels extremely insecure. You could have lots of money, lots of background, education, friends, resources, skills—but none of that is going to make any difference to your security. The more we seek security, the more insecurity that creates. It constantly happens that way." from Just the Facts.
    One could wish to put some jam on this message to make it sweater. I like the bluntness of this quote and I find its directness to be grounding and calming.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 2:47 am

  • Norbert Hasenoehrl says:

    What comes to mind is what is sometimes referred to as his testament:

    Born a monk, died a king.
    Such thunderstorm does not stop.
    We will keep haunting you
    Along with the Dralas.
    Jolly good luck!

    It somehow sums up this incredible, impossible, unbelievable story of Rinpoche's life. It also reflects his utter and total fearlessness in life and death. And it gives me hope beyond hope, so to speak. That's why I like it.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 2:48 am

  • Suzanne says:

    I have two books by him, both of which I enjoy very much; Smile at Fear and Sacred Path of the Warrior. I find gems on every page such as: "...we must look back to see the contrast with the place we came from....we cannot just reject the world of the cocoon, even though it is quite horrific and unnecessary. We have to develop genuine sympathy for our own experience of darkness as well as those of others." (53)

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 2:50 am

  • Laurel asprey says:

    The process of freeing yourself from arrogance and cutting off your habitual tendencies is a very drastic measure, but it is necessary in order to help others in this world. (Pg. 120., Shambhala The Sacred Path of the Worrior.

    This was exactly what I needed to hear, see and feel to awaken my heart and mind. To really be aware wholeheartedly in the world around me. It was necessary to observe my patterns and reactions to all situations and see how I may be grasping.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 2:55 am

  • emanuele balzani says:

    '' you can do it '' [one of the shortest but strongest teachings ever] xxx

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 2:55 am

  • Brigitte Maicher says:

    I do have a favorite quote. "Be law abibing humble and act with decocorum." But after reading all the blogs I now have many.

    Brigitte

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 2:56 am

  • Suzanne says:

    p.s. Thank you for this offer bringing us to this blog, being reminded of his energy from his words was a real gift. Thank you to all who responded and offered a favourite quote and little reminders.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 2:56 am

  • Greg Price says:

    My favorite quote by Chogyam Trungpa is:
    " Don't forget to smile "
    I like this quote because often times we equate our spiritual progress with how serious and determined we look in our facial expressions.
    A spontaneous " smile " will create a spaciousness where kindness and compassion may manifest......so......
    "Don't forget to smile "

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 2:58 am

  • Gabriel says:

    'Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism' - a compass for those starting on the path, those who just think they are on a path, and for keeping the path straight for those further down the road

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 3:08 am

  • Paula says:

    "When mind and body are synchronized in your life and practice, there is very l...ittle chance fr neurosis of any kind to arise. The basis of neurosis, or even physical discomfort and pain, is mind and body not joining together. Sometimes the mind is miles away and the body is here. Or the body is miles away and the mind is here. The main point of practice is learning to be a proper human being, which is known as being a warrior. When mind and body are joined together, then you are joining heaven and earth, and you can be a genuine warrior. This quality of harmony will bring fearlessness. However, this fearlessness will also be punctuated by occasional fear, uncertainty, and confusion." -CTR, Smile at Fear

    This is my favorite quote from Rinpoche. For me it defines how to live a precious human life, every day, every minute, and not to waste time with things that don´t matter or are note really important. Since I´ve begin studying Buddhism, and read a lot of Rinpoche´s books, this for me is the teaching. from brazil. paula

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 3:10 am

  • Thubten Nyima says:

    Book -Cutting Through

    Saying - Just do it!

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 3:10 am

  • Timothy Loftus says:

    The Myth of Freedom. Saved my life and pushed me into the Buddhist path!

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 3:12 am

  • Bryan says:

    "To take refuge means to become a refugee" - Rinpoche said that to us at Tail during one of the first years - I think he was giving the refuge ceremony under the tent in the field.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 3:20 am

  • flore slob-berkvens says:

    I sent 401 you asked for moderation:
    my favourite quote, which is very meaningful to me is:
    You don’t stop the anger, you just are the anger. Anger just hangs out as it is. That is relating with the anger. Then
    the anger becomes vivid and directionless, and it diffuses into
    energy. The idea of relating with the emotion has nothing to do with
    expressing yourself to the other person. The Tibetan expression for
    that is: rang sar shak, which means “leave it in its own place.” Let anger be in its own place.
    relate to the thought process?


    From “Death and the Sense of Experience” in CRAZY WISDOM, pages 137 to 138.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 3:25 am

  • Erika says:

    It is difficult to choose only one nugget of wisdom from Trungpa Rinpoche, but I like this passage from Great Eastern Sun:

    We are not complete monsters. We do occasionally smile. We look at someone, and we feel good. It may be only for a short period, but we have something in ourselves, and if we cultivate that experience, that dot of goodness, that spot, then we find that we have a dot in the open sky.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 3:26 am

  • Elisabeth Gold says:

    everything that he said was helpful to me

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 3:26 am

  • julie says:

    Dharma Art (or True Perceptions)

    I don't think you learn dharma art, you discover it; and you do not
    teach dharma art, but you set up an environment so it can be
    discovered.

    Just like in life. we can lead a horse to water but we can't make it drink. This life of ours...we need to discover it for ourselves with the great fortune of teachers to show us the way.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 3:40 am

  • Victor Ledesma says:

    I like the article from Meditation in Action, After the teacher is gone, "The birth and death of Buddha is merely a concept, an idea, and his teaching is always present. In fact, no one is excluded and all beings—anyone who possesses consciousness, anyone who possesses mind—all are candidates for bodhisattvahood. Anyone can become an awakened person." because it gives us hope, it teaches us that we are all candidates for the Buddhist teachings.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 3:44 am

  • Maureen Peters says:

    My favorite CTR saying is:
    "Whatever occurs in the confused mind is regarded as the path. Everything is workable. It is a fearless proclamation, the lion's roar."

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 3:49 am

  • Steve McGahee says:

    From Meditation in Action, I've always loved the chapter on working with negativity (Manure of Bodhi, I think) and the analogy of the skillful farmer who doesn't throw away the manure but uses it. Similarly, we don't reject the undesirable parts of ourselves, but we can incorporate them and enrich our lives.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 3:49 am

  • Erin says:

    "In tantric philosophy, it is said that the destruction of ego is the spontaneous action of enlightened energy"

    So this ongoing challenge to deal with the ego can leap forward through the the gift of enlightened energy! Love this.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 3:50 am

  • Pam Turner says:

    The warrior is also an artist.
    If the warrior does not feel alone and sad, then he or she can be corrupted very easily. In fact, such a person may not be a warrior at all. To be a warrior one has to feel sad and lonely but rich and resourceful at the same time. This makes the warrior sensitive to every aspect of phenomena: to sights, smells, sounds and feelings. In that sense, the warrior is also an artist, appreciating whatever goes on in the world. Everything is extremely vivid. The rustling of your armor or the sound of raindrops falling on your coat is very loud. The fluttering of occasional butterflies around you is almost an insult, because you are so sensitive.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 3:51 am

  • Rochelle Weithorn says:

    "Communication is the key to world peace"

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 3:55 am

  • Sheryl says:

    "There is no need to be continually just drudging along if you are awake and open in living situations,it is possible for them to be creative, beautiful, humorous and delightful."
    This teaching is the consummate reminder for me to be grateful for the journey of life. How lucky we are to have the nourishment of Trungpa Rinpoche's wisdom.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 4:08 am

  • Jain C Redmond says:

    Book: Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism

    "Spontaneously. Therefore it is accurate, as in the case of causing vegetables to grow; it is very scientific, right on the point. So your actons become exceedingly accurate because they are spontaneous."

    I love that sweet simple example because I love gardening, so true. Let the vegetables and enlightenment grow ! may all beings find peace!

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 4:20 am

  • Sarah says:

    "Make the practice of meditation your source of strength, your source of basic intelligence. You could sit down and do nothing, just sit and do nothing. Stop acting, stop speeding. Just sit and do nothing."

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 4:20 am

  • Karl Nhambu Bergh says:

    "Let he phenomena play" from Crazy wisdom. Trungpa Rinpoche, instead of saying "be patient" has a way of framing things with an experiential eye that takes away the rote religious feelings to spiritual work while accomplishing the meaning anyway. Genius.
    Thank you for the site and all you do for the dharma.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 4:23 am

  • Lorna says:

    I am appreciative of the virtual sangha represented by Ocean of Dharma, and appreciative that the teaching of Chogyam Trungpa are taking on additional life through this means. I believe he would like this!

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 4:26 am

  • Eddie Tippett says:

    I feel connected to the teaching in THE SACRED PATH OF THE WARRIOR. I especially resonate with the concept of basic goodness. Goodness for the sake of goodness as opposed to seeking merit.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 4:29 am

  • Mark Bourdon says:

    Although I have read most of Rinpoche's books, I still carry "Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior" with me and refer to it frequently.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 4:31 am

  • Jim Wagner says:

    If you know "Not" and have discipline,
    Patience will arise along with exertion.
    Then the ultimate "No" is attained,
    And you are victorious over the maras of the setting sun.

    This has helped me many times over the past 22 years, especially in times of confusion and pain, to hold my seat and continue with the vision of Great Eastern Sun.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 4:40 am

  • Carol says:

    The Dharma Art material has been important in my life. Seeing the world from new perspectives and meeting my mind each time I do ikebana, calligraphy, dance, etc.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 4:40 am

  • Jill Sandleben says:

    I loved Meditation in Action for its practical application of the teachings so that we can benefit others. I also love Orderly Chaos

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 4:41 am

  • Elizabeth Lesser says:

    This is from my book, Broken Open.

    I have read more spiritual texts and self-help books than is probably legal. So when I say that one paragraph changed my life forever, I am comparing it to hundreds of thousands of words, arranged into all sorts of poetry and philosophy and prose. I remember exactly where I was when I first read the paragraph, what I was feeling before I read it, and how those words cleared a pathway in my heart upon which I have been traveling ever since.
    It was 1981. I twenty nine years old. My husband and I had recently left the commune and were doing something we had never done before as a family: We were taking a vacation. We were on a picture-perfect Caribbean island with our two little boys, and on I was sitting on a beach towel, as the boys splashed in the sparkling ocean. I was reading in the way that mothers read, with one eye on her children and one eye on the words. The book in my lap, covered with a thin film of sand and sunscreen and the kids’ apple juice, was Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior, by the Tibetan Buddhist, Chögyam Trungpa. Trungpa was one of my first meditation teachers. I met him when I was a nineteen-year old college student in New York City—the same year I met my boyfriend, who would become my husband, and the father of my children, the same ones I was watching while reading on the beach.
    But before then, before marriage and children, back when I was in college, my husband-to-be and I liked to read Chögyam Trungpa’s early books aloud to each other. We would do so while taking the bus downtown in New York, on our way to a funky loft in the Village where we would sit in meditation under the puzzling and electrifying guidance of the man himself. Trungpa had recently arrived in the United States. He was forced by the Chinese to flee Tibet when he was twenty. Escaping torture and death, he led his fellow monks on a perilous winter journey over the Himalayas. After living in exile in India, and then studying at Oxford in England, the young Chögyam Trungpa was picked by the Dalai Lama to bring the Buddhist teachings of Tibet to the West. He would become one of the most important Buddhist teachers of the 20th century.
    I knew Trungpa was a brilliant man and a powerful teacher. But there was something out of control about him, something that scared me. At that point in my young life I was looking for an anchor. I wanted a practice that would keep me from drowning in the ocean of my emotions. I thought I was an over-sensitive and romantic girl who needed some sense knocked into her dreamy head. I thought that maybe meditation or yoga would guide me safely out of the fog, away from the storms, and into the Promised Land of peace and clarity.
    But Trungpa had other ideas about the spiritual quest. He was a wild guide. His directions led right into the inner-ocean, and smack into the waves of longing, fear, anger, restlessness, or whatever else one found in the churning nature of the heart. He taught meditation as a way of swimming fearlessly in any ocean. He was not interested in spirituality as a form of escape. He was training people to become “sacred warriors”—not so that they could do battle with others, but so that they could develop the kind of courage one needs to be kind and happy and radically alive in the midst of the world. There was no dry land, he said; there was only fearlessness, which was to be found in the heart. This was the path to freedom.
    At nineteen, I wasn’t ready to follow that path, and I didn’t stick around long enough to see where it led. I stopped studying with Chögyam Trungpa, but I continued to read every book he published. It wasn’t until I was sitting on the Caribbean beach, several years into marriage and motherhood that I figured out what Trungpa had been talking about. I was now close to thirty, and things were not going well in my life. Although I didn’t know it at the time, I was drowning in an ocean of unexplored feelings. What I did know was that I often was scared and confused. If I stopped to examine my anxiety, I would sense an undertow pulling me downward, as if a monster from the depth was dragging me beneath the surface. But I was loath to look at what lay beneath. What if I found something terribly wrong there? Something wrong with me, or wrong with the way I had arranged my life? What if I would want to make some big changes? What if I started crying and couldn’t stop? These were the kinds of thoughts I entertained but never followed through to any kind of conclusion. I was too busy with my little boys, too overwhelmed at work, too unsettled about my marriage. There was just too much going on to slow down and feel the pull.
    Wiggling my toes in the sand, watching my boys swim in the clear blue water, I arrived at the paragraph where Chögyam Trungpa wrote:
    “Going beyond fear begins when we examine our fear: our anxiety, nervousness, concern, and restlessness. If we look into our fear, if we look beneath the veneer, the first thing we find is sadness, beneath the nervousness. Nervousness is cranking up, vibrating all the time. When we slow down, when we relax with our fear, we find sadness, which is calm and gentle. Sadness hits you in your heart, and your body produces a tear. Before you cry, there is a feeling in your chest and then, after that, you produce tears in your eyes. You are about to produce rain or a waterfall in your eyes and you feel sad and lonely and perhaps romantic at the same time. That is the first tip of fearlessness, and the first sign of real warriorship. You might think that, when you experience fearlessness, you will hear the opening to Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony or see a great explosion in the sky, but it doesn’t happen that way. Discovering fearlessness comes from working with the softness of the human heart.”
    I sat on the beach with those words resonating throughout my body. Reading them was like looking into a mirror and loving my face for the first time. “You feel sad and lonely and perhaps romantic at the same time,” Trungpa wrote. “That is the first tip of fearlessness, and the first sign of real warriorship.” Was he saying that the peace and clarity I was searching for was already within me, waiting in the liquid gold of my feeling heart? That I had been repressing the very parts of myself that could liberate me? This was revolutionary, and yet at the same time, completely obvious.
    Everything that I knew to be true about life was in that paragraph. How many times had I felt a mysterious link between my small, tender heart and the vast spirit of the universe? How many times had genuine tears of sadness made me feel strangely bold and alive? How many times had I almost awakened from dullness and self-doubt while in the chambers of beauty and love? Trungpa was telling me to trust what I already knew, to dignify the longings of the human heart, and to respect its romantic, quixotic nature. He was saying that life as a human being here on earth could not be sanitized, rationalized, or tranquilized into a rigid vision of the way it’s “supposed to be.” Life would always be quirky, dynamic, changing, and messy. The way of the heart—that inner instinct that draws us creatively into the chaos of life—is, ironically, also the way out of confusion, anxiety, and suffering.
    Certain moments are like swinging doors that lead from one room of a life to another. In that moment, sitting on the Caribbean beach and imbibing Trungpa’s words, I took my first steps beyond the room of trying to be someone I wasn’t. The door swung open into the long hallway of becoming myself. Trungpa’s teachings convinced me to use my heart’s compass on the journey. Perhaps that compass would lead me into the unknown. Perhaps I would have to make some big changes. I was still afraid, but now I sensed where to look for courage.
    It would take years for me to integrate what I had read into my life. But at least now I understood the roots of my inability to make big and powerful decisions at home or work. I had been asking only one organ—my poor brain—to carry the full weight of my life. It was time to give some of the work over to my heart. Why had I been so afraid to peer into its depth? Perhaps it was because intellectual understanding was lionized in Western society, and emotional intelligence was berated as an untrustworthy way of experiencing reality. Perhaps it was because I had grown up in a culture and a family that valued thinking and doing over feeling and loving. But here was Chögyam Trungpa, this brilliant thinker, this advanced scholar, and this brave warrior whispering like a spiritual Cupid in my ear: “Follow the tender girl who longs for love. She knows the way. Don’t be afraid.”
    For the warrior,” says Trungpa, “the experience of sad and tender heart is what gives birth to fearlessness. Conventionally, being fearless means that you are not afraid or that if someone hits you, you will hit him back. However, we are not talking about that street-fighter level of fearlessness. Real fearlessness is the product of tenderness.”

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 5:04 am

  • steve winn says:

    "DRM and CCL"

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 5:05 am

  • steve winn says:

    DRM and CCL

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 5:06 am

  • gwen says:

    "It's as if Buddha were talking in your brain. " We just watched this film at our center for Parinirvana day. I love that he sums up Prajna in this way. I loved how it left some people stumped as to what he meant. He answered one question by saying something to the affect that Buddha doesn't live in a pigeonhole. That he wouldn't fit. It's funny, light, simple, to the point and still leaves us to contemplate it further.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 5:17 am

  • Jeanette Howe says:

    "Everyone loves something, even if it's only tortillas." — Chögyam Trungpa Being from South Texas, I know this is true and this quote reminds me that the capacity to love even small things leaves open the possibility of extending and enlarging that loving capacity.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 5:24 am

  • Rob says:

    Whereas a covenant of trust breeds
    further mistrust, wariness of trust can bring enormously warm
    and genuine relationships.

    --from The Heart of the Buddha

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 5:30 am

  • Sally Barney says:

    I've always loved "Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism." Just the title alone (which I shorten into 'Cutting Through Spi. Mat.') is a phrase which sticks with me and applies very often to present situations. I also love "Meditation in Action," which I found to be difficult until I took the time to really go in - then I discovered a great resource to return to again and again.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 5:41 am

  • Stephen Pedersen says:

    Since everything is naked, clear, and free from obscuration, there is nothing to realize or attain.

    The everyday practice is simply to develop complete acceptance and open-ness to all situations and emotions and to all people, realizing them totally without hesitation or blockages so you do not withdraw or centralize on your self.

    I learned it from a sign posted on the wall in Drala

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 5:45 am

  • Marietta MG says:

    Trungpa Rinpoche was my first teacher, even though, I've never met him, since he long has passed away, before I started my studies. He has been the realest presence in my life for years, ever since I first came across one of his books, "The Myth of Freedom". I know that I can always, unfailingly count on his guidance. His astonishing ability to always answer to any question one might have is available to all through his books. Thank you for keep on publishing them.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 5:45 am

  • Dianna says:

    It is quite remarkable to me that exceedingly difficult ideas are always made crystal clear by the greatest teachers, among them Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche. I am aware of many of his sayings that resonate with me truly and deeply. It startles me and completes me to read his words. When you know his mind you never need to pick out just one idea from the many to support your little life. I love his heart and his majesty in life and above all his courage and strength to become real and deep. His mind is an amazing gift to this planet. When you limit yourself to his mind, you choose one quote before all the others - be truth, be conscious and be free.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 5:50 am

  • Hanne says:

    In his talks on "Body, Speech and Mind" Trungpa says : "I appreciate your head and shoulders". I like this, because I'm practicing aikido and know how important this is.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 5:51 am

  • Elisa C. Strobel says:

    "The job of a spiritual friend is to insult you" (from "the myth of freedom")

    It seems that we all have the tendency to try to run away from "this uncomfortable spot" in our lifes. It doesnt matter in the end whether we use drugs, become workaholics, enjoy hanging in front of the television, if we try to avoid contact with that "that colleague or person that always annoys me", if we don't call "that friend anymore because he/she sais something stupid (that was uncomfortable for us)" - we always have the tendency to get rid of that person, that situation or that feeling, and we are pretty creative in finding ways of how to do that. Acting like that we can become lazy in comfort, we can get stuck and blind. We need friends around that can show us where our soft spots are, where we close up, where we get stuck and where we seem to lose our path.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 5:51 am

  • Bob Goldthwaite says:

    In line with the incredible irony of all of his teachings, my favorite, most useful saying was: "One of the main goals in life is to learn to be genuine in the present moment!" I found this on a daily Zen calendar!

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 6:00 am

  • Stan Wolf says:

    "Coming to the Western world, I encountered the makers of the clocks, big and small, and the makers of other machines that do wondrous things - such as airplanes and motor cars. It turned out that there was not so much wisdom in the West, but that there was a lot of knowledge."

    This quote from Great Eastern Sun (Mirrorlike Wisdom) provides a good context for how we assess our impact on the world, and the imapct on us of the world we have created.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 6:04 am

  • Brett Astor says:

    "The ego wants to attend its own funeral"

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 6:05 am

  • Shannon Davis says:

    When you don’t punish or condemn yourself, when you relax more and appreciate your body and mind, you begin to contact the fundamental notion of basic goodness in yourself. So it is extremely important to be willing to open yourself to yourself. Developing tenderness toward yourself allows you to see both your problems and your potential accurately. You don’t feel that you have to ignore your problems or exaggerate your potential. That kind of gentleness toward yourself and appreciation of yourself is very necessary. It provides the ground for helping yourself and others. ~ Chögyam Trungpa, The Sanity We Are Born With

    I am humbled and inspired to be reminded that gentleness leads to sanity. -SD

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 6:16 am

  • Claire Mikan says:

    "We cannot change the way the world is, but by opening ourselves to the world as it is, we may find that gentleness, decency and bravery are available - not only to us, but to all human beings." The Sacred Path of the Warrior.
    This quote spoke to me as i tend to be a dreamer and suffer when reality "the world as it is" does not align itself with me... my vision of how the world should be. Each day i am practicing to be more open. To be the gentle warrior that my world needs me to be right now!

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 6:26 am

  • Michelle LaFaver says:

    What I most loved about our dear teacher was his ability to express the beauty in his heart which allowed his words to reach all peoples. My favorite quote of his is from an excellent volume of poetry,"Timely Rain" :

    How beautiful to be in the realm of nonexistence:
    When you dissolve, the dot dissolves;
    When you open up, clear space opens.
    Let us dissolve in the realm of passion,
    Which is feared by the theologians and lawmakers.
    Pluck, pluck, pluck, pluck the wild flower.
    It is not so much of orgasm,
    But it is a simple gesture,
    To realize fresh mountain air that includes the innocence of a wild flower.
    —From "Off Beat"

    Chogyam Trungpa is a true example of the "buddha-nature." The wisdom and love he passed on to Pema Chodron has changed my life. I no longer worry about death and strive to ease the suffering of those around me even in small ways. When meeting a difficult person, I send them love and light.

    I am also very thankful for his School of Disembodied Poetics at Naropa University. As a reader of Kerouac and Ginsberg, I am so very happy that their message of peace continues at such as beautiful place.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 6:30 am

  • Tatjana says:

    As you know, it is difficult to choose only one favorite teaching of Trungpa Rinpoche's. However, an all time is the poem Don't Trust. In my experience it addresses straightforwardly and eloquently our naivete and encourages us to deeper insight and reliance upon and recognition of our own buddha nature.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 6:31 am

  • Susan Gaylord says:

    In 1974, while spiritual shopping through various buddhist and other authors, both ancient and modern, I found myself standing in the "Intimate Bookstore" in Chapel Hill, NC, attracted to a provocative title, "Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism." I was blown away by the message, and moreover, I discovered later that not only was this amazing individual, Chogyam Trungpa, still alive but that he was teaching in Vermont! (How I found this out before the age of the internet is still a mystery to my children). The rest, as they say, is history. I am so grateful to my teacher for his immeasurable kindness, compassion, and fearlessness, in meeting us here fully, in this dark age and "thrilling world" (to use his words). Thank you for helping to keep his words and messages alive.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 6:35 am

  • Pam Burwell says:

    My favorite book is 'Crazy Wisdom'. And a favorite quote...well, there are so many it's hard to choose, but here's one I read often:

    "The most difficult discipline is to be what you are. Constantly trying to be what you are not is much easier, because we are trained to con either ourselves or others, to fit things into appropriate categories. Whereas if you take all of that away, the whole thing becomes too irritating, too boring. There's no room for talking yourself into anything. Everything is quite simple.' Yes!

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 6:36 am

  • J. Lehrer says:

    "Spiritual discipline is not based on becoming somebody else. But you become you in your enlightened version. That is the whole point."

    I found it refreshing to contemplate the idea that even when we reach enlightenment, we still have our own unique characteristics.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 6:41 am

  • Jose says:

    Cutting Trough Spiritual Materialism, because of the great importance of those teachings

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 6:57 am

  • Cristiano says:

    Crazy Wisdom - live hopelessly and you will truly experience Tantra

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 7:02 am

  • Joan says:

    "Do not be afraid to be yourself!" CTR

    If I could remember this all the time, I would be a kinder, happier human being. As it is, I can remember it sometimes and it opens me up (or at least has that possibility).

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 7:05 am

  • jack convery says:

    "There is only working with people, and working with young people is the best." This was CTR's simple response when I said something to him about working in a school filed with so much confusion. It was so true at that time in Woodstock Vermont. It is is so true now working in Kyoto.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 7:21 am

  • Barb says:

    I continue to return to Shambhala: Sacred Path of the WArrior...and Spiritual Materialism....These two keep me grounded...I've given them many times as gifts as well...

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 7:32 am

  • Kai says:

    My favourite book: Shambhala: The Sacred Path Of The Warrior.
    Kai

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 7:37 am

  • Amanda Minogue says:

    My favorite book (so far) is "Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism". I read it at a time in my life when I really needed grounding. It was a great wake up call to recognize how my ego had taken over my spiritual practice.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 7:37 am

  • Tracy Suchocki says:

    "Look. This is your world! You can't not look. There is no other world. This is your world; it is your feast."

    What a powerful gift this teaching is.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 7:40 am

  • Laurie says:

    Journey Without Goal is the most valuable to me. I put small sticky notes on the pages that I knew I wanted to revisit often, and when I finished the book I had a little forest of little yellow stubs sticking out the top of it - every page offers a common-sense touchstone, a consolation, a mind bender or an inspiration. Some pages offer all of those things. I loaned it to a friend at the beginning of his studies, and he is now a gifted teacher in his own right (and even wrote a song of the same title). Simply put, Journey Without Goal opened my eyes.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 7:41 am

  • Gretchen says:

    "Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism" -- I read an excerpt online and it completely rocked my world. I got the book as soon as I could and soon found my entire spiritual life transformed, and myself set firmly on a Buddhist path with integrity and authenticity.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 8:04 am

  • Shala Blackburn says:

    From: "Wise Fool"
    "Acknowledging foolishness is a very powerful and important experience. We could almost say that being willing to be a fool is one of the first wisdoms. The phenomenal world can be perceived and seen proprerly if we see it from the perspective of being a fool. There is very little distance between being a fool and being wise; they are extremely close. When we are really, truly foolish, when we actually acknowledge our foolishness, then we are way ahead. We are not even in the process of becoming wise—we are already wise."

    This is one of my favorites because the only real goal I've had is to become wise. But I've only ever felt like a complete fool most of the time. How was I to know that there was so little distance between them?!

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 8:10 am

  • Carole Winn says:

    my favorite book is, "the myth of freedom". i like it best because it offers so many useful concepts and practices. :-)
    please enter me in the drawing.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 8:16 am

  • Bruce Wauchope says:

    One of my favorites (possibly not an exact quote): "Before we can have 'all hands on deck', we must have hands."
    This means to me that to develop true compassion and not harm others, no matter how good our intentions, we must develop compassion to ourselves, clarity and wisdom via practice and study before we can truly help others.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 8:20 am

  • Will Goldberg says:

    One of my favorite books is the first that I picked up in college in 1980, "Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism". During that time, I had a great longing for my own authenticity and was cautious of taking on a practice only to shore up my low self esteem. It was a miraculous moment for me to pick up a book that seemed to so cogently put into words what I longed for and spoke so directly to the traps that my intuition hinted at...

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 8:25 am

  • Jim Dunn says:

    “Without others and the challenges they present, we would have no chance at all to develop beyond ego. So the idea here is to feel grateful that others are presenting us with tremendous obstacles. Without them, we could not follow the path at all.” in Training the Mind.
    Cultivating a sense of gratitude for everything has been one my most valuable practices.

    Jim

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 8:27 am

  • Janis Treleaven says:

    I love this. I copied the quote because it is fairly long:
    "The essence of compassion is to copy how you relate with your child (in your relationships with others). The problem is how much you want to be the head of the family or the ringleader of your friends. You know, if that ambition is not there, but you have a genuine willingness to share, that is precisely the concept of sangha, or the Buddhist community, in traditional terms. You are willing to be friends with everybody, but at the same time you are not particularly taking credit. You don’t make people depend on you. Everybody can stand on his or her own feet. The ideal of helping is to make others independent of you. You help them to become more independent rather than making them addicted to you."

    TO me, it means to also employ the concept of non-attachment. As a single parent raising an 8 year old child, this is such an important teaching for both myself and my daughter. It helps with self esteem, something which young people struggle with - encouragement, guidance yet willingness to let her make her own mistakes, giving her opportunity to "stand alone" and find out that it's ok.... will also help her carry on with confidence when I am gone. Not depending on anyone, not having someone totally depend on you, letting that person - in this case my daughter in particular, find who she or he is and that they can see through their own eyes, not just from others, what this world is laying out before them moment by magical moment. This quote in particular hits home with me.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 8:37 am

  • Rebecca Johnson says:

    My favorite saying is "There is no problem when people are not stuck on anything but are in the process of expanding." I tend to bog down on problems and this reminds me to look about.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 8:38 am

  • Steve says:

    "The basic sense of delight and spontaneity in a person who has opened fully and thoroughly to him or herself and to life can provide wonderful rainbows and thundershowers and gusts of wind."

    Although the above is excerpted from a piece on Dharma Art I think it enshrines exactly where I see Chogyam came from.A place where ''reality'' and ''ego'' are superseded by love and as stated above it all starts within oneself.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 8:53 am

  • charmaine says:

    Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism is my favorite - it's the first of Trungpa Rinpoche's wonderful books that I read, and I felt and still feel as if he is alive and available for every reader. Thank you so much for continuing to share his teachings.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 9:04 am

  • Jeff Rubin says:

    So much wisdom so little time, but to choose one.......

    "Disappointment is the best chariot to use on the path of Dharma" from Cutting Through.......

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 9:11 am

  • Todd Jailer says:

    Cutting through Spiritual Materialism spoke to me as a north American always striving for achievements to justify my existance to others, and most of all to myself.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 9:14 am

  • David McCallum says:

    My favorite quote so far is from "Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism." "We must surrender our hopes and expectations, as well as our fears, and march directly into disappointment, work with disappoint, go into it and make it our way of life, which is a very hard thing to do." To me moving into the disappointment is moving into reality. Although painful it seems more sane.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 9:16 am

  • Judith says:

    Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism was the first Vajrayana book I read in the 1970s. eye-opening!

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 9:24 am

  • Katia Keston says:

    I liked an article in the Shambhala Magazine in 2005 written by Gretel Ehrlich. In the present year alone, a resurgence in my reading has occurred due to picking up and leisurely reading her novels on nature.

    thanks, Katia

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 9:33 am

  • Barbara B says:

    "...I noticed the grass, I noticed the hills, I noticed the highways, I noticed the dirt road, I noticed the car rows in the parking lot..."

    Fundamentally, discipline comes down to the shamatha practice of developing awareness, through which one merely sees what is. Every moment is now, and one acts through the experience of the present moment. -Meditation in Action

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 9:44 am

  • Dave D. says:

    “Guilt is not fundamentally healthy, because it has the quality of condemning whatever happens and not seeing the inspiration or positive aspect in things. Often a guilty conscience comes from self-hatred, constantly condemning oneself. The only way to overcome guilt is by seeing that there is nobody to blame for the chaos or the difficulties in life. Chaotic situations are not punishment, but they are steppingstones. Then you can see the positive within the negative.”

    This teaching, when I can remember the pith of it, takes enormous, self-imposed pressure off, and helps me create space to see that self-aggressive self-experience from off to the side, instead of from within it.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 9:47 am

  • tara says:

    What follows isn't my personal favorite quote - i couldn't decide so picked up "The Sacred Path of the Warrior", closed my eyes and opened it at random, asking Trungpa to choose. Interesting how relevant it is given recent events..

    "..if human beings violate their connection, or lose their trust in heaven and earth, then there will be social chaos and natural disasters... If we apply the perspective of heaven, earth, and man to the situation in the world today, we begin to see that there is a connection between the social and the natural, or environmental, problems that we are facing. When human beings lose their connection to nature, to heaven, and earth, then they do not know how to nurture their environment or how to rule their world-which is saying the same thing. Human beings destroy their ecology at the same time that they destroy one another. From that perspective, healing our society goes hand-in-hand with healing our personal, elemental connection with the phenomenal world.” from The Sacred Path of the Warrior - Chapter 16 - Sacred World

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 9:50 am

  • Joy LeVine Abrams says:

    My favorite quote is one I heard from you, Carol, at the Pema Chodron weekend (Smile at Fear) this past Oct in SF. You told us he was always saying:

    "YOU CAN DO IT!!!"

    And that's what I need to hear most.

    Joy

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 9:53 am

  • Daryl says:

    “The bad news is you’re falling through the air, nothing to hang on to, no parachute. The good news is there’s no ground.” – Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche

    There is no ground, there is nothing to fear.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 9:57 am

  • Martha Schoenemann says:

    Fearlessness contains a feeling of joy and relaxation or well-being. From the goodness of simply being yourself, a quality of upliftedness arises, which is not overly solemn or religious. It is joyful to be in such good health, joyful to have such good posture, joyful to experience that you are alive, you are here. You appreciate colors and the temperature of the air. You appreciate smells and sounds. You begin to use your eyes, your ears, your nose, and your tongue to explore the world. You have never seen such penetrating and extraordinary red before. For the first time, you see such cool and beautiful blue. For the first time, you see such warm and delicate yellow. You see such refreshing, earthy, and wet green; such pure, clean white, as though you are opening your mouth and breathing out at the same time. For the first time, you see such wonderful balck. It's so trustworthy that you can almost sleep on it. It has a sheen, which reminds you of stroking a black horse.
    From Smile at Fear. This quotation appeared on your website in Oct 2009. I like it because it reminds me about the possibility of joy through our sense perceptions. It's an articulation of experiences I've had and an inspiring reminder that these are available again.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 10:01 am

  • Jim Yensan says:

    I'm inspired by the many different ways people in this long list are connected with Chögyam Trungpa's being through his spoken and written teachings. As I read through the list I think "That's my favorite!" One thing he would say as an on-the-spot meditation instruction was "Let it be that way." Someone else posting above mentioned that—rang shar shak, leave it in its own place.

    I'm also very moved by today's quote, which reminds of so many occasions on which he pointed to the self-existing intelligence within one's questions and doubts, and cut through the strategies of poverty mentality and hero worship, encouraging a genuine opening to the spiritual friend's world.

    A favorite book? How about the chapter "Discovering Magic" in Shambhala: Sacred Path of the Warrior. His presentation of windhorse and drala principles are vitally needed in our world today.

    And this quote from a letter he wrote "…my relationship with the teachings is inseparable from my whole being. I do not try to rise above the world. My vocation is working with the world."

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 10:09 am

  • Robin Anderson says:

    I found Shambala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior many years ago. I loved it that he said that women could be warriors. I was surprised and heartened by his description of the sadness of the warrior.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 10:10 am

  • Peter says:

    The Myth of Freedom:

    People complain that Buddhism is an extremely gloomy religion because it emphasizes suffering and misery. Usually religions speak of beauty, song, ecstasy, and bliss. But, according to Buddha, we must begin by seeing the experience of life as it is. We must see the truth of suffering, the reality of dissatisfaction. We cannot ignore it and attempt to examine only the glorious, pleasurable aspects of life. If one searches for a promised land, a Treasure Island, then the search only leads to pain. We cannot reach such islands, we cannot attain enlightenment in such a manner. So all sects and schools of Buddhism agree that we must begin by facing the reality of our living situations. W cannot begin by dreaming. That would only be a temporary escape.; real escape is impossible.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 10:13 am

  • Pat says:

    Chaos should be regarded as extremely good news.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 10:23 am

  • Chris says:

    "Dharmas Without Blame" from Garuda III. The title alone is a whole teaching.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 10:24 am

  • Jonathan says:

    "The challenge of warriorship is to step out of the cocoon, to step out into space, by being brave and at the same time gentle "
    There are so many other great ones in The Sacred Path Of the Warrior. Definitely a favourite book.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 11:40 am

  • Bryan Gillette says:

    My favorite book is Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism. Powerful!

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 12:16 pm

  • Belinda Griswold says:

    "Fearlessness comes from working with the softness of the human heart."

    Could there be a more pithy instruction for the path of practice? I think not!

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 3:12 pm

  • Kim Hegan says:

    I studied with Kanjur Rimpoche in the 1960's and 1970's in India. In those days I had to learn the tibetan language and background culture to understand the complex concepts he taught.
    Chogyam Trungpa has changed all this..bringing the Dharma not only into western language but expressing in familiar concepts that allows access for all western students of the Dharma.
    Thankyou Rimpoche

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 4:41 pm

  • Blaine Flewin says:

    from Work,Sex,Money...p.125
    If our approach to sex, or anything else in our life, is connected with that primeval quality, we find there is a possibility of wonderful skillful communication.
    Finally insight and guidance on the subject of sex... This entire chapter of Chogyam Trungpa's is beautiful, has enhanced intimate connections with my partner and opened us to new heights of communication.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 6:13 pm

  • joey bidner says:

    i know the contest is over, but i will pst anywayz :)
    my favorite quote from trungpa, is from smile at fear ,"A warrior sits on a throne of exertion and wears a crown of patience." This quote has helped me in remembering that the way of the warroir is about living and embracing the struggles of our situation. They will always be there and we need to let go of our constant need to grasp them in our attempts of making our problems go away.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 6:38 pm

  • Colleen Palmer says:

    "Shambhala The Sacred Path of the Warrior" changed me. This is a book that is gentle and powerful. It woke me up! There are so many gems of wisdom in this book. Here's a quote that I love: "Real fearlessness is the product of tenderness. It comes from letting the world tickle your heart. You are willing to open up, without resistance or shyness, and face the world. You are willing to share your heart with others."

    Posted on April 5, 2011 at 6:27 am

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