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Commenting on Work, Sex, and Money

February 14, 2011

In the opening chapter of Work, Sex, Money: Real Life on the Path of Mindfulness, Chögyam Trungpa asks:

As Buddhist practitioners or practitioners of meditation, we are supposed to be immersed in the contemplative tradition and spiritual practice. Why would we discuss work, sex, and money?

In the next chapter, he goes on to suggest:

Shouldn’t the basic point of spiritual practice be to inspire an understanding that permits us to relate with life in the fullest way? From that point of view, work, sex, and money could be said to be the highlights of the spiritual experience of everyday life.

What do you think? Does spirituality relate to everyday life, to the nitty-gritty, to work, sex, and money? Share your thoughts on this topic, for a chance to win a copy of the book. Five winners will be randomly selected at the end of the week.

Congratulations to Alanda, Shenyen, Barb, Rupa, and Bryan! They each won a free copy of Work, Sex, Money: Real Life on the Path of Mindfulness. Thank you to everyone who took the time to leave a comment. Stay tuned for more contests and giveaways!


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347 Responses to Commenting on Work, Sex, and Money

  • Vanessa says:

    Thank you for posting this today. V-day can be difficult for me, as I feel crushed by expectations and what love is supposed to look like. I appreciate the reminder to have some perspective. Have a beautiful day!
    V

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 12:24 pm

  • Mariana says:

    Spirituality and spiritual practice means relating genuinely to what is: in this context it is very much the nitty gritty, work, sex and money. Everything comes up during meditation!

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 12:26 pm

  • John Eberly says:

    Here is my random comment that will enter me into the random drawing for one of five free copies of WORK SEX MONEY.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 12:28 pm

  • jeffliveshere says:

    For me, "spirituality" just *is* about everyday life--being in the moment, moment-to-moment. Can't wait to read this book!

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 12:30 pm

  • william says:

    A glove is lying on a table: a hand slips it on.
    my life is the glove: my spirituality the hand.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 12:33 pm

  • Gretchen Neve says:

    Passion without attachment and an open heart...what a counter cultural notion! I have heard/read often that passion is a problem in the teachings. The teachers must have meant "passion with attachment". This quote opens some interesting questions. How to be passionate while practicing equanimity? What would mindful passion feel like? How do we best discern agenda-based passion from the enlightened kind? The kind of passion oointed to in the quote is probably more steady more than fiery though I don't actually know. As always, more to learn.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 12:34 pm

  • Carl says:

    What do you think? Does spirituality relate to everyday life, to the nitty-gritty, to work, sex, and money?

    I agree that work, sex, and money all offer us opportunities to practice mindfulness. When I am driving to work and I encounter difficult traffic, I can observe my body tense up, my breathing become less relaxed. Just bringing up the topic of money with my partner roils the currents of the ego in both of us, and this is also an opportunity for observation, and for consideration of the meaning of that roiling. Trungpa says, "passion is a powerful thing." Spirituality is something we practice in the hope that we can become less deluded in the way we related to the powerful, and perhaps immutable force of passion in our lives.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 12:35 pm

  • Therese Lahaie says:

    I recall reading that love is an unselfconscious spark floating on air, as soon as you start to try to contain it ...it goes out.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 12:40 pm

  • JohnR says:

    Being fully present, being now, just being with gentleness seems challenging at best...when discussed in the context of Work, Sex, and Money...yet this IS daily life. Looking forward to reading this discussion.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 12:44 pm

  • Bobby Walker says:

    I got my first Chogyam Trungpa when I was 14. I love his work.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 12:48 pm

  • Eileen says:

    What do love, sex, and money have to do with spirituality? I think that our brains are wired for all four! Money helps us meet our survival needs. Sex meets the need for a deep physical connection to another person. Love brought us into the world and we must have it to thrive. We are wired for spirituality as well -- that's our deep connection to the world we know and the place where we were before and where we will return.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 12:55 pm

  • Emily Utz says:

    Sounds like the most relevant dharma book I can imagine! Can't wait to read it!

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 12:56 pm

  • Madeline Schreiber says:

    High Pitch

    Awareness limpid clear and bright
    Glowing warm a heart of purest gold
    That high pitch voice, song birds on the wind
    A touch, the breath of space herself

    The sun does a double-take when you feel like shining

    Words ring true and ripple on and on
    Transparency, the teardrops from your eyes
    Please smile again on an average earthly morning
    Your light will carry us until we meet in sleep

    Binding factor,
    Madeline
    Halifax

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 1:01 pm

  • billjanssen says:

    What are we so afraid of?

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 1:04 pm

  • Paul says:

    I am trying to think of something relevant to write. Therefore, I cannot think of anything relevant to write. As a result, there may be something relevant in what I have written.

    PS I really like the new design of this website!

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 1:04 pm

  • Felice says:

    I once read in a biography of Buddha that it was impossible for laypeople to reach true freedom because they are immersed in the distractions and hooks of everyday life. It was very dismaying, so I'm glad to see this book, which seems to address this head-on!

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 1:04 pm

  • Robert Ziegler says:

    Passion.
    Passion is.
    Passion is what
    Passion is
    Nothing else.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 1:04 pm

  • Katherine Hamilton says:

    I have only read excerpts and quotes of Trungpa, and truthfully some of it is inaccessible to me, so I would welcome the opportunity to explore in more depth.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 1:13 pm

  • K F says:

    The heart is spirituality in all life situations. Where your heart is in relation to work, sex, and money also goes to the mind. Where the mind goes, has everything to do with being mindful.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 1:15 pm

  • AmyP says:

    I have wanted to read some of Chögyam Trungpa's work for some time. I would love to have that opportunity!

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 1:16 pm

  • Christine Holderness says:

    By practicing and permeating the dharma into all aspects of day-to-day life courage, love and acceptance is woven more deeply into the fiber that envelopes us all.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 1:17 pm

  • Peggy Caldwell says:

    Without doubt spirituality is part of every moment of every day. This sounds like a terrific book to read and have as a reference for those of us who choose to live full on in today's complex and often ambigious world.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 1:17 pm

  • Jim Countryman says:

    This sounds like a wonderful book, I can't wait to read it!

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 1:18 pm

  • Chris says:

    We have to start where we are, so of course these topics are relevant. But they are not ends.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 1:19 pm

  • Jai says:

    There isn't any aspect of life that the dharma, and CTR's teachings in particular, doesn't illuminate and give concrete instructions and inspiration for.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 1:31 pm

  • Jon Leland says:

    Thanks much for these exquisite quotes and commentaries. Please enter me for a free book. I'm OK with a Kindle edition if that's easier. :)

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 1:35 pm

  • Debra says:

    The test of authentic spirituality is it's applicability to issues of everyday living.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 1:36 pm

  • Stephanie says:

    I would love to read this book... I love all the writings of Chogyam Trungpa, especially "Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism". Happy V-Day, everyone.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 1:46 pm

  • Marc Olmsted says:

    Love is the law, baby...

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 1:53 pm

  • Candace Asher says:

    I owe any sanity I have to Choygham Trungpa RInpoche.
    A Shambala student in NYC in the late seventies, crazy wisdom is the only path I trust. I wish I could get to Boulder more, recommend it highly to all to experience his center, son and sangha keeping the flame. All of the works and the projects on this site, the newsletter mailings are impeccable. Thank you all.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 1:59 pm

  • Lyn Ciampa says:

    XO

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 2:00 pm

  • Jennifer Lawrence says:

    a m a z i n g

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 2:04 pm

  • Kathleen O'Neill says:

    Spirituality relates to all aspects of our life. If we have a duality in our purpose- we will constantly be in disconnect with the present. We must be true to our inner most being- spirituality- in order to be successful and congruent with all aspects of our life, sex, ,money, and work. A split focus will result in inner and outer conflict- and stress.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 2:09 pm

  • krystie edwards says:

    work, sex and money is where all the juice is for me. where I have to practice the hardest at softness, at letting the world in, letting be and aligning all the spheres to stay sane. sounds right on the knocker!

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 2:16 pm

  • Lawrence Pettener says:

    This book sounds like it will help me to enjoy more of all of these without feeling like I'm being spiritually materialistic; I was on a Theravadin path for a long time, and after two years, this path still feels new. Trungpa speaks the most grounded common sense I've come across in a lifetime of spiritual exploration.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 2:16 pm

  • Chris Bauman says:

    Every one of us is hooked by one of these three issues -- if not all. They are where the juice is; wonderful, painful opportunities to see where we are stuck. I look forward to this book which, like all of VCTR's book, resound like a Japanese bell, reverberating around my mind for a very long time.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 2:17 pm

  • chris begnoche says:

    Thank you for gathering this book together. I look foreward to reading it

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 2:34 pm

  • Steve says:

    I believe one has to put the spirituality into everyday life and not the other way around.Life rolls on and to bury ones head in the sand is not really an option for most of us so anything that points out the dichotomy and how to transcend it can only be beneficial.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 2:39 pm

  • Kevin Ahern says:

    One of (if not) the main things that compel me to explore the teachings of (first) Pema Chodron and, through her, Chogyam Trungpa is how absolutely they reveal we are bound to the present moment, our reaction to each and every internal/external stimulus that come to us. Work, Sex, and Money just seems like one more shoot of this gigantic plant.
    Thanks for all your work, Carolyn.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 2:45 pm

  • Sara Stewart says:

    Thank you for bringing forward this book! It is badly needed in this day & age.
    Blessings

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 2:46 pm

  • Caro says:

    I carry the pocket Trungpa around with me so I would love to
    have this book.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 2:55 pm

  • Dan Altman says:

    Of course it is relevant. Spirituality provides the ethics of our appraoch to these topics. We will either have a wholesome or unwholesome perspective and Buddhism promises a wholesome approach based on centuries of examination of the workings of mind.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 2:58 pm

  • Pam says:

    Sounds like a good book to read and share.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 3:00 pm

  • Jeff Shapiro says:

    Learning about the self is among the most important learnings that we can do. One part of that learning, of course, is minimalizing the self's experienced importance, or even seeing beyond it. Previous to that, for most us, one must learn just what the self is, and does.

    A good step in this direction is noticing what one does easily, 'voluntarily', often with pleasure--- about which one does not have to say to oneself "I should...". And, in contrast, noticing those behaviors about which one needs to apply pressure. At the level that most of us are, this differentiation [pleasure - pressure] is of great importance, and its acknowledgment can lead to deeper insights.

    Work, sex, and money can be examined within this context, at any particular moment: does this or that one require pressure, or is it a pleasure moment...could it be neither, or both?

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 3:02 pm

  • Char says:

    It seems like whatever our life contains is what we have to work with. Whether you want to call it "spiritual" doesn't change that it is our life, and it's the only access to our self-expression and the unknowable mystery that makes life so fun...

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 3:08 pm

  • Jim says:

    The book looks very interesting.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 3:09 pm

  • Scott says:

    Well, is any comment random?
    Wishing I could buy this for my kindle, but a free copy will be read and donated to shambhala Brunswick/Portland.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 3:51 pm

  • melanie says:

    Yes. Isn't the highest measure of an enlightened being one who can have the life of a householder and lead it in a spiritual way?

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 4:08 pm

  • Sher says:

    Learning how Everyday living is the expression of spirituality...tis my wish made at Bodhgaya

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 4:23 pm

  • MaryAnn Reynolds says:

    Work, sex, and money. I would love to read what CTR wrote about these aspects of life!

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 4:43 pm

  • Robert says:

    "Does spirituality relate to everyday life, to the nitty-gritty, to work, sex, and money?" Absolutely. That's why I treasure this book by Chögyam Trungpa. As usual, he helps folks deal with the here and now, the challenging issues in daily life -- usually avoided -- where real learning and spiritual unfolding occurs. We can tell ourselves that sitting in meditation, per se, and conceptual insights are sufficient for change. In contrast, Chögyam Trungpa wisely guides us toward what my teacher called "24-hour meditation," where we use every moment, every emotional disturbance, every struggle, every reaction and instance of resistance, and every discomfort as a signpost to the most powerful leverage points or fulcrums of growth and healing lie.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 4:45 pm

  • cynthia says:

    dear Carolyn,
    Had a touching experience in LA DD years ago
    A mother and her young son visited one day.
    She insisted on borrowing the tapes "Love, Sex and Money", although she was not a member yet.
    She never returned them. Her family told me over the phone, she died soon after.
    Years later a young man was driving some of us to the river for a swimming outing at a rural retreat center
    guess who he was?
    more later?
    thank you for all your continuing works
    love c

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 4:50 pm

  • Mark Dining says:

    As my Gram said - love makes the world go 'round!

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 4:52 pm

  • Alanda Wraye says:

    Trungpa still speaks. thank you

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 5:19 pm

  • Beth says:

    Our Buddhanature is vast and unfathomable as the universe, Happy Valentine's Day everyone

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 5:26 pm

  • kate booth says:

    primordial is the key. it is what we are..everything else is our ego tugging

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 5:53 pm

  • elle drury says:

    It all about our life on the planet.. Sex Work and Money so important to share ideas, thoughts and learn from others.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 6:01 pm

  • Jackie says:

    For me, everyday life..."work, sex, money" is the most fertile ground for me to work with my spirituality.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 6:07 pm

  • Conny Anderson says:

    From applying teachings such as the three poisons, to simply staying present, the Shambhala teachings are always about this moment, no matter what is occurring in this moment. I don't think all spirituality necessarily applies to everyday life, and that is why I am a Buddhist in the Shambhala tradition.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 6:08 pm

  • Michael Levy says:

    That title will draw in the fringe observers! Be prepared to deal with the suffering of getting what you want....

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 6:11 pm

  • Anne says:

    Sex, Work and Money are great topics for any book, but especially a book coming from CTR!

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 6:22 pm

  • Mollie says:

    If we as humans did not use our daily lives as an opportunity to practice many of us would never have the time mmh or we would not have as much time!

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 6:27 pm

  • Kathy H. says:

    I am taught that I must strive to practice certain spiritual principles in all my affairs...so work, sex and money top the list as the most challenging areas for me.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 6:33 pm

  • anita says:

    each day i begin anew...

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 6:48 pm

  • Masa says:

    My sense is that spirituality is always with us, always what and who we are. If we try to separate it from everyday life, then we create a split, and the mind can then get busy deciding what and what is not spiritual, and doing a big dance thrashing around with that. I have had and know others who have had "transcendent" experiences of emptiness. No amount of trying to isolate these from the rest of our experiences and force them into being our constant "state" will give us peace.
    I'd love to read Rinpoche's teachings on this, as I feel I find freshness in the way he expresses just about everything. Thank you.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 7:24 pm

  • Lizzy Cline says:

    Work, sex, money.......sounds like the average North American day to me. Or two out of three ain't bad.....

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 7:27 pm

  • Patrickk says:

    The trick (as usual) is to stay present... conscious. In that case isn't it all just a matter of relating to the energy?

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 7:33 pm

  • ellisheva says:

    Truth be told, we must marry the world of ideas to the world of action.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 7:38 pm

  • Helen says:

    I like the provocative and obvious title - these teachings must be part of the 84.000 ways. A must-have book..

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 8:53 pm

  • Anni Heldtz says:

    whatever we do, have done or will do is immersed in any one of, or combinations of, work, sex and money.
    there is no escape...so by playing our part in the constant dance of gently embracing and playing with this reality we are living...!!!

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 9:04 pm

  • Jon Fles says:

    The whole point of spiritual practice and meditation pactice is to be immersed in the present moment; the here and now. Its about how we relate to ourselves and the people around us. Through meditation and spiritual practice we cultivate an understanding of ourselves and others that allows us to relate in a more understanding and compassionate way to every situation we find ourselves in.
    Thank you for putting this book together.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 11:21 pm

  • shrimala says:

    I love this quote, it was so relevant for me - thank you. I'd relish seeing what the rest of the book has to offer.

    Posted on February 14, 2011 at 11:32 pm

  • tenzin shenyen says:

    Buddhism as a practice is not obsessed with boundaries and territories, so naturally it has the ability to place itself next to, inside and at one with anything. The opposite is conceptualisation, artificiality, self-contradiction. More and more I feel that using everything is the only way.

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 1:13 am

  • Huy Nguyen says:

    http://soundcloud.com/wuy/harmony-no-4

    This song is dedicated to you Carolyn for all the great Shambhala work you've done over years. Thank you and don't stop!

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 1:51 am

  • Cathy says:

    AS human beings living on the earthly plane, of course these are relevant topics. Would love to hear more of CTR's wisdom on the subjects.

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 2:14 am

  • Ania says:

    Transform your darkest energies into determination to follow your heart based passions. It is such a powerful driving force and keeps you connected to the world around- us as participants in life, bot just bystanders. It is synchronization with the language that the world speaks today to affect its shape and really make a difference.

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 2:31 am

  • David Wimberly says:

    Thank you, Carolyn, for continuing to bring forth the jewels of wisdom of Chogyam Trungpa, Rinpoche. And where better to apply that wisdom than where we are in each instant, such as with sex, money and work.

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 2:39 am

  • Shelley Mackinnon says:

    This is the material of the non-monastic practitioner. We don't live in caves or monasteries but in the middle of NYC trying our best to hold spiritual values.Now that can be a tall order.

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 3:00 am

  • dinesh says:

    spirituality and religion- is every moment of daily life .raher than during weekly temple/church service.

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 3:07 am

  • Angela Nielsen says:

    Everyday life is what we have been given to work with. We can look at it as plain and "everyday" or we can realize that every moment can be a spiritual experience.

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 3:12 am

  • Angela says:

    Spirituality doesn't so much relate to the nitty-gritty of life, it is an expression of it. Like, you can take a truffle and make it into a delicious meal with home-made pasta and extra-virgin olive oil. Or you can just look at it as a dirt-covered fungus.

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 3:14 am

  • Renee E. D'Aoust says:

    I've almost read all of Trungpa's books, so I look forward to this one, too! Thanks much.

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 3:19 am

  • Joanne Burgess says:

    The Natural Essence of Mind shines through everything. There is no way to separate that from any experience of life. No struggle - just relax.

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 4:24 am

  • Andea Pucci says:

    Trungpa Rinpoche pointing a transparent finger at the moon.

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 4:25 am

  • Karuna Ojanen says:

    sex, work, money - all are exchanges of energy. They just are. It is nice what they bring to us - pleasure, money, satisfaction, ego. If the spiritual isn't about everyday life, then it is of no use to me. Of course, the everyday is the everything.

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 4:30 am

  • Dayna says:

    A goal of mine is to incorporate spirituality into all aspects of my life, in other words, to recognize the spirit, the being, within me that is doing the doing whether it relates to work, sex, money, or to child rearing, driving, and eating, among many other topics.

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 4:57 am

  • Sarah Quigley says:

    So long as ego rules, I'll never make enough money to be a "success." I'll never find a Valentine who knows "diamonds are forever" and who deems my faults adorable. And work? I will be a puppet performing for applause, feeding on recognition and running from constructive criticism. The separate "wanting self" fills us with despair. To tap into the compassion and love that is there for us when we let go of our demands and just "let it be," is a better tonic than those caffeinated drinks that promise "5 hours of energy."


    is a better tonic than those drinks that promise "5 hours energy."

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 4:58 am

  • Bonnie Shulman says:

    If we can't apply our practice to Work, Sex, Money -- the bugaboos of our lives -- then our practice isn't worth much!

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 5:05 am

  • Michael Wallin says:

    Hi Carolyn--
    Well, let's see...My comment: I probably was among the first to ever see Chogyam Trungpa on these shores...When I was a junior at UC Berkeley in 1968, I went to a talk given by an unassuming young man in a black suit & tie in the basement of some building off Telegraph Ave. (maybe on Durant)...There were probably 25 people there in the small room...I was rather blown away & I'm still a huge fan of Trungpa's, getting my hands on everything he's written...So this new book sounds very interesting as it deals with 3 major components of living as a human on this planet...I'd love to get a copy!
    Michael Wallin
    San Francisco

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 5:33 am

  • Tom Klien says:

    are these really till now unpublished teachings? or just a new collection of already published ones? the quote i have read on love ("the flame of love") reminds me very much on a chapter in "the myth of freedom". in any case, there are hardly any teachings to be found more relevant to modern life then trungpa's.

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 5:45 am

  • Suzanne says:

    All of these things offer a wonderful expression of ourselves, clay to play with. It is easy to be in bliss with no distractions and pretending not to be human, but it is only in our humanness do we grow and offer ourselves to the world.

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 7:04 am

  • Justin J Engle says:

    Spirituality relates to everything imho. You don't wake up or go to sleep without your spirit, just as you don't suspend your spirit to eat or drink.

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 7:30 am

  • Zea Mays says:

    what about POWER? It fits with the other "hot" subjects in the category of "hot" topics.

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 7:34 am

  • Paul says:

    I'm looking forward to reading this one -- thanks!

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 8:09 am

  • Lee Worley says:

    The older I get the more I find that there is no such thing as "spirituality" vs "life". Spiritual is about the breath, without the breath connecting me with all else and all else with me there is no life. The question is how much are work, sex, money, these narrowing concepts interfering with the freedom of my breath to comingle me with it all.

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 8:14 am

  • Michael says:

    I and my life partner (of 15 years) are 60 years old. Last year I retired to pursue a home business. Last summer, through poor money management, I went through a Chapter 7 bankruptcy, and we may lose the home I've lived in for 27 years. Also last year, after a life of monogamy, my partner chose to consciously explore her sexuality by entering into sexual relationships with other men, while I remain monogamous. I seek to presence my love for her, while I experience much pain and fear at her choice. Guess all aspects of this book are highly relevant to my life situation, and how my spirituality interweaves through it. Namaste.

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 8:15 am

  • Mark says:

    Work, sex and money (and everything else) are merely empty expressions of the Absolute in its play.

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 8:19 am

  • Mark says:

    All are merely empty aspects of the Absolute in its play.

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 8:20 am

  • Chris says:

    I don't think spirituality should be a component separate from life but something that eases and enhances it.

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 9:25 am

  • Heather S says:

    Isn't spirituality about the way we relate with our experience - all of it? Why would anything be excluded in that sense?

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 11:12 am

  • Katy says:

    I just try to be humble regarding whatever is arising in regards to sex and money, or anything else in my life. It is my karma. Every moment I have an opportunity to accept what is or fight what is. An attitude of humility helps me to accept what is. When I am in a place of acceptance, I am more able to respond in an open hearted way, which is more beneficial to myself and others.

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 11:22 am

  • Sue Coleman says:

    Paying attention to our thoughts about the nitty-gritty--and abiding with that experience. I would like to read this book!

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 12:38 pm

  • Tara says:

    This sounds like a terrific book. I think there must be a Buddhist/meditation-inspired perspective on these 3 mega-topics. They're pretty important components in life!

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 3:06 pm

  • Fidelis (Dale) Warren says:

    Greetings, Carolyn. Thank you for taking the time to keep this fabulous blog going. Blessings!
    When I first heard the title of this book, I was somewhat surprised, but then my friend who was telling me about it said it was written by Trungpa Rinpoche, and I just smiled and nodded in appreciation. I can't wait to read it.

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 4:39 pm

  • Douglas Beall says:

    All of these are part of the display of awareness. If this is recognized, then they are self-liberated and pure, apparent aspects of the expanse of equality.

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 4:49 pm

  • Bob Del Tredici says:

    Spirituality makes meaning out of the taffy of mind and matter.
    Work, sex, and money are the ground, the nourishment, and the rocket fuel of our lives. Trungpa's insight into the primordial energy of life is the key.

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 6:08 pm

  • Nora Yuliani says:

    Nobody talks that sex is a part of Dharma, but Trungpa did!

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 8:38 pm

  • Diederik says:

    Work, sex and money: In the world but not of it. This Sufi saying reminds me of the life and work of Chogyam Trungpa.Starting as a monk he came completely in the world of work, sex and money which is very inspiring to me and many others.

    Posted on February 15, 2011 at 9:42 pm

  • Pandu Ranga Reddy K says:

    Teilhard de Chardin said :

    We are not human beings having a spiritual experience. We are spiritual beings having a human experience.

    Sri Ramakrishna Paramahansa said :

    "Be in the world but not of it."

    Spirituality and every day life cannot be distinguished into separate compartments, but are inseparable and complementary to each other in order to make life a whole. One cannot be permitted to say that spirituality is meant for a particular day/time and the other time for mundane existence. Spirituality is meant for enriching mundane existence to fulfill one's life.

    Posted on February 16, 2011 at 2:37 am

  • da ji says:

    Spirituality and everyday life - how could these be "separate"?

    Posted on February 16, 2011 at 4:39 am

  • Barry says:

    Looking forward to these teachings as aspects of creating a Shambhala household.

    Posted on February 16, 2011 at 4:43 am

  • Anna says:

    sounds pretty much like life to me. Looking forward to reading the collection on these topics....

    Posted on February 16, 2011 at 5:42 am

  • Louise says:

    Boy, the dharma is NEVER far away from everything we do!!! We just can't get away from it, So let's try do deal with it!

    Posted on February 16, 2011 at 6:49 am

  • Chris Chamberlin says:

    Each day of our lives our work, our passions, and our attitude towered wealth - and worth - all offer us opportunities to practice mindfulness.

    Posted on February 16, 2011 at 9:09 am

  • Tammy says:

    It goes without saying that work, sex and money all deeply affect our spirituality both negatively and positively.

    Posted on February 16, 2011 at 10:06 am

  • Tami says:

    I do beleive that spirtuality is needed in everyday life. From work and family down to the "nitty gritty". I know myself when I'm having a hard day with my kids, or at work, I take a time out to meditate. Even if it is only a few moments, but its reaching out to that spirtual influence for guidance and/or patients in what ever it is that is bringing me down at that moment. I do this with work and my finaces as well.

    Posted on February 16, 2011 at 10:08 am

  • Bryan says:

    I agree with Barry...looking forward to these teachings as it relates to creating a Shambhala household. I would say that spirituality must necessarily be carried into life or the spiritual aspiration isn't worth a grain of salt.

    Posted on February 16, 2011 at 10:08 am

  • Travis May says:

    I think, quite simply, that the mark of our spiritual practice is how we manifest in our real, day-to-day lives. Work, sex, & money are all things we all have to deal with. If our spiritual practice cannot help us to work with these details of our life more skillfully, then what good is it?

    I can't wait to read this book!

    Posted on February 16, 2011 at 10:10 am

  • germaine says:

    It is nice that this book will help us to remain in that sweet spot of mindful spirituality!

    Posted on February 16, 2011 at 10:11 am

  • Desirée Nielsen says:

    However much we need formal practice, in order to stabilize our meditation and understanding in a protected environment - we also need whatever meets us in daily life, for better or for worse, in order to learn more. We get our little tests and great challenges - then, we might try and bring that back with us to the cushion. This is where Trungpa Rinpoche´s teachings come in handy - in the end, there will be no difference between formal practice and informal ditto! And we might finally begin to JUST BE

    Posted on February 16, 2011 at 10:15 am

  • jonah m bekerman says:

    everything matters. working with the actual circumstances of our lives ,not separating them from spirituality but including them means that every moment,every circumstance is an invitation to a view that expresses awakening

    Posted on February 16, 2011 at 10:19 am

  • Dustin Rippengale says:

    I desire this book. Let's see where that desire gets me.

    Posted on February 16, 2011 at 10:24 am

  • Jeff says:

    What happens on the cushion is practice. Just practice. What happens off the cushion is the real thing.

    Posted on February 16, 2011 at 10:27 am

  • Steven Albert says:

    All of it is spirituality: the "good", the "bad", and the indifferent. the key is learning to see it all that way (which I have yet to learn)

    Posted on February 16, 2011 at 10:51 am

  • daniela solzbacher says:

    this is it

    Posted on February 16, 2011 at 11:03 am

  • Elizabeth Marshall says:

    The challenges of a spiritual practice are constantly thrown into one's face during the pursuit of Work, Sex and Money. The quintessential challenge is to retain the cushion's teachings while in the "real" world.

    Posted on February 16, 2011 at 11:11 am

  • Tobias says:

    When we are able to peak through the mundane and become mindful we begin to understand the holiness and divinity in all that we do; love, cry, work, sex, cleaning the bathroom, and connecting with others.

    Posted on February 16, 2011 at 11:36 am

  • John Miller says:

    The way I understand it there are 2 paths of thought. The first is that spirituality is what's real and everyday living is folly. The second is that spirituality and everyday living are incredibly intertwined, in fact they are one. Perhaps the first path (dualistic) is necessary for awhile, but then the second path (nondual) brings one into a whole new awareness. The very fruit of our spiritual practice is to be found in our everyday lives. Any practice that does not bear fruit in everyday life is folly.

    Posted on February 16, 2011 at 11:53 am

  • pwilliamstein says:

    Absolutely. Spiritually is how you carry yourself in each moment, not just on Sundays, or during meditation. It's called practice because you are learning how to be spiritual in everyday life. Going out and executing what you've learned when you're out in the world working, earning and spending money, and concerned about sex.

    Posted on February 16, 2011 at 12:48 pm

  • Tiffany says:

    Here is my random comment that will enter me into the random drawing for one of five free copies of WORK SEX MONEY

    Posted on February 16, 2011 at 2:11 pm

  • Designer G says:

    Spiritual consciousness is a moment-to-moment awareness of presence; it premeates all our actions, behaviors, thoughts whatever we are doing. Everything is inter-dependent, inter-woven. The material outcome reflects the degrees or percentages of our development in many areas of life as all are not equal, I imagine until we reach enlightenment. I believe we are in a state of continual transformation and naturally doing our best to integrate to be our highest whole self.

    Posted on February 16, 2011 at 4:12 pm

  • Rosemary Davey says:

    Life goes on around us and it is how we react or consciously act that allows our spirit to grow. Therefore, everything in life is a spiritual process including Work, Sex and Money.

    Posted on February 16, 2011 at 4:31 pm

  • Tish Jennings says:

    It's almost always either WORK, SEX, or MONEY that takes me away from the present moment. I would love to have this book! Sign me up!

    Posted on February 16, 2011 at 5:21 pm

  • Robert Tapp says:

    THis is the book I have been waiting for. I have struggled for years to figure out how to be fully present, fully authentic in the midst of my crazy life. With my bitchy wife, my kids who are always hungry or dirty, my professors who are always pushing me to read useless crap they think is important. How do we relate to this with compassion, generosity, discipline,etc.? Maybe this book can help.

    Posted on February 16, 2011 at 5:39 pm

  • sharon says:

    Hmmm - the passionate buddist, passion without attachment. I have MUCH to learn.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 2:55 am

  • RZangpo2 says:

    I always say, married people argue most about three things: sex, money, kids. What a relief to have two of the three covered by VCTR!

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 3:15 am

  • wade wilson says:

    Work...Sex...Money. Sounds like three words to decribe western civilization! Perhaps its time we moved on.
    Wade
    Fredericton

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 3:19 am

  • Dominic Watson Wall says:

    The idea of continuity between generations is a fascinating contemplation in an era when some many families are scattered around the world.

    Thanks for the inbox-dharma!!

    Dominic

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 3:25 am

  • Joe Arak says:

    Rinpoche's teachings are often, like the one today about father and child relationships, so ravishingly simple and practical. We complicate things so much with the conceptual overlays our little minds color the world with. As meditators and seekers of the true nitty-gritty, Rinpoche invites us and shows us how to find that in the continually unfolding moments of our lives.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 3:27 am

  • Caroline says:

    These words produce towering emotions -- even just by uttering them. They are part of the braid of our lives.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 3:31 am

  • Ana Goncalves says:

    I think everything is interrelated and spirituality is a very big part of who we are, and why we are here, so although these aspects of our life may seem mundane I feel they are opportunities to share our authentic self, our core through the outlets. Thank you so much for hosting this giveaway!

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 3:31 am

  • Jan says:

    It would be a treat to read this "new" work from this wonderful teacher. Practical dharma is what we need now: family dharma, workplace dharma, relationship dharma. I welcome this offering. Blessings of well-being to all...

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 3:33 am

  • Steve says:

    Daily life provides the basis for our spiritual practice. Without the challenges of daily life we have little that we can work on.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 3:36 am

  • Angela says:

    We can read the dharma all we want (and I want to read this book!), but life experience is the real basis for human learning. Our experiences surrounding work, sex, and money provide us with the actual "stuff" with which we must work.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 3:47 am

  • cesar says:

    spirituality IS everyday life, the nitty-gritty work-sex-$$$ thing! to distinguish a separation would be as Rinpoche would say, "spiritual materialism". i remember a teacher said to us once, "we have to decide if we want a little spirituality in our lives, or if we want to live the spiritual life." to me this mean fully engaging in, life. thank you for your wonderful work! - cesar

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 3:49 am

  • Christine says:

    This is a very real topic to consider. We don't all choose to go to the nunnery or back to university to study Buddhism. So how do we continue to have Buddhism in our life while we live in the world?

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 3:50 am

  • George Laws says:

    Thank you for sharing all this good teachings.
    GL

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 4:00 am

  • Shelle says:

    Absolutely, spirituality is part of everyday life. We can't all join the monastery.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 4:01 am

  • Jim says:

    Looking forward to reading this.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 4:06 am

  • Kate says:

    We're having a family reunion soon - I'd love to think it was on the 'basis of an absolutely beautiful frienship', with no pride, sense of inferiority or obligation. I'd like to read more....

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 4:09 am

  • Betsy says:

    I think to be in the Buddhist spirit we must try to always be present in the moment. So this would include our dealings with work, sex and money, and may be difficult to accomplish.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 4:10 am

  • Jay says:

    There is no question, in my mind, that the inner spiritual life has a direct correlation with the outward displays that we produce in ourselves. Unlike the more commonly known mantra "we are what we eat," the greater truth is that we are, I believe, what we seek. The greatest challenge is, however, not to allow our non-spiritual side to take the lead and take us to places we would prefer not to go. The greatest challenge, it seems, for us is to transition our spiritual, inner life, into more meaningful, more reflective, yet effective, outward life-more truly representing who we are...or, at least, wish to be.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 4:12 am

  • Felice says:

    Thank you for offering the opportunity to read this "new" book from a timeless teacher.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 4:18 am

  • Eliza says:

    Three important and difficult topics to discuss. I look forward to reading the book.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 4:29 am

  • trikester says:

    Loved reading others' comments on this topic - very expansive and thoughtful. I have nothing else to add. Just that I hope to continue to learn about Buddhism, both from this page, its readers and contributors, and hopefully from THE BOOK! :)

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 4:38 am

  • Pam says:

    Sex, work, and money are potent triggers that stimulate our ego's attachments and identifications and are therefore rich areas for contemplation and self-inquiry, two critical aspects of conscious spirituality.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 4:42 am

  • Heather Midori says:

    Our daily life is intertwined always with elements of our teachings- spiritual, temporal, artistic...otherwise dharma is untested, unfounded. If we pay attention the smallest gesture is a mirror of the phenomenal world blazing with basic goodness; every morning when I first arise I look on my snowy balcony to see the random footprints of local birds, squirrels and other inhabitants of my shared earth...even before doing my morning chants, or first coffee- there it is-ever changing patterns, signs of buddha nature at my doorstep...

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 5:05 am

  • Barbara says:

    Pick me! I am looking forward to reading this book.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 5:15 am

  • Jean says:

    Spiritual life is the "theory". Real life is the "practice"/lab work.
    Both are necessary, and intertwined.
    Would love to read this book!
    Thank you for offering it!

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 5:23 am

  • Buck Clarke says:

    Everything is spirituality. That's all there is.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 5:31 am

  • Shivani says:

    May God bless everyone who has a true spiritual practice, for we are the harbingers of right Action, right Thought, and true compassion. Many Blessings to all of you. May the universe give us strength and wisdom to lead the way for all sentient beings on the planet.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 5:41 am

  • Mara Critchett says:

    These 3 things, are what stir the pot, we all have our greatest challenges with them, for a reason...to exercise our spiritual core. From them is where the greatest understanding comes of ourselves and our relationships with all beings. I have never read this books, but so appreciate one of his students Pema Chodron. Thank your so much for giving me the opportunity to get into his work.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 5:55 am

  • Katey schultz says:

    thanks for the quote. it brought me to this site and i enjoyed the other posts below it as well.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 6:19 am

  • Jim Dunn says:

    The key is simple -- let go and be present to life

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 6:20 am

  • Brian says:

    WSM=Trungpa's first talk in USA ?

    Everything IS the Dharma.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 6:45 am

  • Ed Pulsifer says:

    I am facing difficult decisions at work and am trying to be mindful during the process. Thanks for all your good words.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 6:47 am

  • Alba says:

    For me, finding ways to express compassion, altruism, friendliness in everyday life is to bridge the gap between ideals and the activities of an ordinary day.

    The 'continuity of expectations' is a statement of faith in reconciling the gap.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 6:58 am

  • mike says:

    Having grown up DESPITE a pride/obligation-based family, i made it pretty much my business (once i'd worked that out, which took the time it took) to try and encourage friendship and mutual trust between my children (now all non-consenting adults, i'm pleased to say) and i. Needless to say, it works. The other most definitely doesn't.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 6:58 am

  • Daryl says:

    I can see how meditating helps me see my attitude and approach to everyday life, and the point when I cling to "me". I get confused, however, about "idiot compassion" and discerning the difference.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 6:59 am

  • Chris says:

    So much said already. I remember ordering these tapes years ago and barely understanding anything he was talking about. Thanks for making it more accessible in book form. I'll never forget VACT's words at a Buddhist Christian conference-1982- 'without passion, there is no compassion.' I did think I understood that.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 7:21 am

  • Cheri Fry says:

    Looking forward to the book on life and what spirituality means in everyday life.Namaste

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 7:25 am

  • john Odenthal says:

    WSM was the collection of teaching that most shifted my entire life (and that of my friends) , by making it crystal clear that true spirituality was actually about the kitchen sink, i.e. life,disappointment,money,activity,noise --- rather than escape from those things.
    Eternal thanks to him and the practice lineage,
    John Odenthal, Halifax

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 7:34 am

  • Dan Anderson says:

    Practicing mindfulness as a general attitude since I learned about it over 30 years abo has been a blessing, this book would add to that.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 7:37 am

  • Dorothy Johnson says:

    Spirituality is to be lived, moment-to-moment. We cannot separate our spiritual life from our daily life. Our spiritual practice helps us deal with love, sex, and money. That is, to practice moderation in those areas: to love without attachment; to enjoy sex without it becoming the sole basis for the relationship; and to use money for its true purpose, which is to sustain our existence--provide for our needs, not consume us and cause suffering when we don't have as much of it as we desire. Thus, spirituality helps us control our desires and subsequent attachments when our desires are fulfilled.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 9:00 am

  • Hakim says:

    I really enjoy the Ocean of Dharma newsletter. Thought for the day is Breathe In, Breathe Out.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 9:00 am

  • Faith says:

    Yes! Absolutely! Everything is practice. No limits. Why not?

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 10:45 am

  • Evan says:

    I am thankful to Trungpa Rinpoche for continually reminding us that not only is our everyday life--ie work, sex, and money-- part of the spiritual path, but that it actually esentail to waking up.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 11:46 am

  • Muin Daly says:

    I have been born into a family with 4 brothers and have been taught that obligation is required to all of them because they are blood brothers. I have also felt that they communicate with me (their sister) from that same sense of responsability. The youngest however has always been a friend as well and I have been full of gratitude my whole life that I have experienced the difference. Thank you for the Dharma Quote this week,it has brought to mind and heart that wonder full feeling of kin ship. I sent it to my brothers ,in hopes that they subscribe to your newsletter. Thank you for your wisdom sharing.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 11:48 am

  • Paul Persofsky says:

    Does spirituality relate to everyday life? It better. What's the point of living for some afterlife?...... Trungpa himself defined spirituality as 'being without deception'. I think he was talking about not having illusions about life, about going beyond the petty fears and aggressions of an unexamined life... Meditation and spiritual practice put us in touch with the present moment and that's where life is lived. Living fully is synonymous with spirituality.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 11:51 am

  • Camille says:

    Yes, the two are inseparable... That's why it's so challenging... There aren't robes and bells to remind us all the time to come back... Just our own room, workplace, mate... mind our with it's regular tricks!

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 12:46 pm

  • Michael says:

    All our tomorrows are cloaked in mystery. Just be spontaneous today.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 2:03 pm

  • Russell Kelly says:

    If spirituality does not relate to the nitty gritty of life and particularly to work, sex and money, it is worthless. Spirituality to be of any value has to transform these domains of our life into wise and compassionate life. These are the grist to the spirituality mill, the smelly energetic stuff that Pema asks us to value and use in our spiritual lives - to use to grow up. This is a great theme. It is extraordinary how we can divorce these key elements of our lives from notions of spirituality. Thanks Trungpa Rimpoche.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 2:54 pm

  • Steven Tetterington says:

    CTR was Real. CTR was always about "Cutting Through" - to the truth, to the Essence, to what Mattered Most, and pointed out a Different Way to Achieve the Real Desires. At the same time he knew what mattered most to people - what they craved for. Hence, the title. These were the "Big Three". As he always did, he gave them a different meaning and understanding than the typical conventional ones and pointed us toward a New Way & an Enlightened Path.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 3:14 pm

  • Jonathan says:

    I think this book would be a great and relevant read for everyday life :)

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 4:29 pm

  • Kent says:

    WORK as a SPIRITUAL PRACTICE by LEWIS RICHMOND touched on the difficulties of money and work.
    This looks to be an intresting read

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 5:09 pm

  • Beth McGibbon says:

    Paying attention to where my energy goes is a great challenge for me. I work too much, react too often and feel depleted at the end of the day after teaching high school students. This book may help me find the place in the middle.

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 5:18 pm

  • marion rae says:

    Work sex and money pretty much covers the triggers for me. Today i was contemplating how to ask somoen who owes me money to followe the payment schedule they set. I fgound myself feeling resentful and would vbery much like chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche'sd take on it...I am sure it is coming from a different asnd helpful perspective!

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 7:13 pm

  • marion rae says:

    Work sex and money pretty much covers the triggers for me. Today I was contemplating how to ask someone who owes me money to follow the payment schedule they set. I found myself feeling resentful and would very much like to read Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche’s take on it…I am sure he is coming from a different and helpful perspective!

    Posted on February 17, 2011 at 7:16 pm

  • Klaus-Peter says:

    After so many years Rinpoches teaching on the hot topics of everyday life are as accute and fresh as ever. I wish I could translate this into Chinese, this would be a great book to publish here in China.

    Posted on February 18, 2011 at 12:04 am

  • Jane says:

    Carolyn, How titillatingly challenging!

    'To relate with life in the fullest way...'

    Work: Yup. Sex: Well that dignifies a very colourful youth... (But challenging idea to re-engage now I'm older). And money? Well, I had always been reticent(Renunciation being the foot and all that) but this feels like the gauntlet being thrown down. License to explore. What fun. Invigorating.

    To think that all this time I had been avoiding a highlight of spiritual experience. Obviously I never got the point about non-duality...

    Thank you once again Carolyn.

    Posted on February 18, 2011 at 1:18 am

  • jenny ward says:

    It doesn't seem to matter what Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche talks/talked about it always seems to strike an immediate chord of familiarity and appropriateness, always so fresh and although it may be new to me it's as if I always knew it somewhere deep inside...........I met him once in London many years ago and what he said then was the same.. its quality still seems to pervade my life....even now, such a deep knowing and ring to his presence, I never tire of hearing his words and
    I am grateful to him beyond words.

    Posted on February 18, 2011 at 5:47 am

  • Nadia says:

    If work = mindful sharing
    If sex = mindful Loving
    If money = mindful compassion
    then I believe those 3 to be "Real Life on the path to mindfulness".

    Posted on February 18, 2011 at 8:50 am

  • Rebecca says:

    My motivation in spiritual cultivation is to help myself and others in every day life. I'm not doing so well at it at the moment.

    Posted on February 18, 2011 at 1:28 pm

  • Claire Vickery says:

    EVERYTHING is spiritual. We often get the idea with spiritual life, that everything has to be all pure and perfect. Yet, people have intimate relationships, have to buy things, and work in less than pure careers. Let's be less idealistic and 'pureland' and live in the real world. Work, sex and money are part of our lives, and CAN be spiritual if we are motivated by love, rather than ego. And even ego doesn't have to be a dirty word. It is the way mind perceives self. But let's avoid arrogance and clinging to self and consider others.

    Posted on February 18, 2011 at 5:52 pm

  • Anna says:

    Spirituality is the core of our existence. It is how we relate to everything in and around us.

    Posted on February 19, 2011 at 3:06 am

  • darlene says:

    Mindful Passion!! Incredible. Who would not want to work towards that concept.

    Posted on February 19, 2011 at 4:24 am

  • DalaLuz says:

    I would love to find some light in my confusion... Work, sex and money are all lacking in my life due to long-term illness. My life has meaning, I know this rationally, but all too often I fear it has none, that I have no place in society, that I am not complete. No matter what he teaches on, I find that Chogyam Trungpa's teachings are always enlightening, helping me to see deeper, wider, completer, always to the point, always with such loving humor and insight to all our foolish ways and fears and never lacking complete & all-pervasive compassion.

    Posted on February 19, 2011 at 8:03 am

  • jr says:

    Work, sex and money are cool enough. I've never had much of an interest or talent in work or money. Sex, I am interested in from time to time. I guess integrating spirituality into everything you do is the point, from what I've heard. But what I really want to know, if I'm being honest, is how to make myself disappear in a mirror.

    Posted on February 19, 2011 at 1:32 pm

  • Stewart says:

    If anything is excluded by spirituality, it is not genuine spirituality just as the Tao contains all and relates to all.

    Posted on February 20, 2011 at 10:58 am

  • Bob Gillespie says:

    I love the title of this new book. CTR said it was a kitchen sink reality.

    Posted on February 20, 2011 at 5:38 pm

  • Rafael Rendeiro says:

    I think that the total immersion in spiritual practice is a privilege of a few. To most people, like me, spiritual practice needs to battle its own space in our crazy life. We don't have a lot of time to sit and meditate, so, we need to convert everything in spiritual practice. That's why discussions about money, sex and work are so important.

    Posted on February 21, 2011 at 2:39 am

  • Elizabeth Byrnes says:

    My answer to the question of spirituality is: OF COURSE! I was just thinking this on my walk a few days ago. Walking is part of my meditation routine, I need to think more about my spirit as I meditate and how most people do not give their spirit enough opportunity to exist in everyday moments. We live in this modern world and need to grow our spirits to exist fully in the world. So that means sex, money, work, just as much as life, death etc are a part of the spirit.

    Posted on February 21, 2011 at 3:08 am

  • Scott Passin says:

    I don't think spirituality and spiritual practice are separate from life. They are directed in some way or another. The practice of many is a dream state.

    Posted on February 21, 2011 at 7:36 am

  • Rupa says:

    Trungpa's words are always fresh and sharp like ice and never fail to cut through whatever layers of conventional concepts we may hold dear

    Posted on February 21, 2011 at 8:12 pm

  • martin says:

    Viva! Las Vegas!

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 7:14 am

  • Edmund says:

    "King Dawa Sangpo is the first lineage holder of Shambhala. It is said that he requested the Buddha to give him teachings that he could practice without becoming a monk. The Buddha gave him teachings that could be practiced by lay people in the context of their usual societal obligations. It is said that, in the kingdom of Shambhala, it was easy to practice dharma and the society was vastly uplifted." From The nalanda Translation Committee website.

    ...this book therefore is a fruition of King Dawa Sangpo's supplication. May it flourish for all those who feel the sadness of samsara.

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 7:15 am

  • Jim says:

    I think spirituality is a western term designed to lure us away from the ordinary. It is very tempting to imagine a more wonderful reality separate from the everyday. But this is a trick of ego, designed to keep up apart from this sacred world.

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 7:16 am

  • Jan Patterson RN says:

    Money, Sex, and Work are definitely part of the path of mindfulness. They are part of the distraction, part of the vehicle in which we live, part of the way we relate to each other and to the world, and to ourselves. Each dollar, as said above, contain relationships with many people: each is an opportunity to remember that *now* is the moment of mindfulness.

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 7:20 am

  • J., Kotre says:

    So many people providing comments! So my story goes like this: I live in Boulder and went to see the screening of "Crazy Wisdom" this past weekend. Halfway through the movie, there was footage of the original talk that Trungpa Rinpoche gave on Work, Sex and Money. I was stunned because years ago when visiting SMC, I bought an 8 x 10 photo of Rinpoche to which I was strongly drawn. There were many photos for sale but this one really struck me. It has sat on my shrine for years now and I have always wondered what the talk was where that picture was taken. The movie showed it was the talk that this book is based upon! So since Friday I kept saying to myself, "I need to buy that book" and today I received your weekly email and see that you are giving a few copies away! I would love to have one of the books. I know there is something in that book especially for me! Thanks for this beautiful new format Carolyn. Thanks for all you do. Your stories in the movie were fantastic!!

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 7:22 am

  • Robin says:

    All I can say is hmmm. Perhaps I'd viewed these arenas as outside the purview of spirituality, somehow separate and distinct from that quiet place where I attempt to connect with my true self. Although I practice mindfulness everywhere, it's always with that quiet place in mind. The illusion is the distinction between work/home/self, and yet part of me continues to see the distinction as necessary...

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 7:27 am

  • Judith says:

    There is no way to separate spirituality from daily life - they are one. Spirituality is just how we *are*. Everything we do, how we see, needs to be transformed Where else but in daily life would you practice?

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 7:30 am

  • Carol Busseau says:

    Money has devolved into a means unto an end; I believe we were better off bartering-- knowing the true worth of a thing crafted and created by human hands. I struggle every day to be mindful of my cash flow, as it has slowed to a trickle and I have many many (I assume) years ahead of me to learn the lesson of mindfulness in regard to money.

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 7:34 am

  • AmBuer says:

    I think spirituality is definetly related to work, sex, and money. If we are not fullfilled spiritualy then we can not reach our true potential in work, sex, or in dealing with our money matters. We need to open our heart and souls to what our true potential is. I have found by experience that unless my soul is happy then I do not perform my best, in work. I do not want sex when my soul is not in a good place, and I make poor choices when it comes to money. Spirituality definetly connects everything!

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 7:35 am

  • Jim Dunn says:

    Great title! Looks like a great book

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 7:36 am

  • Kathleen Wheeler says:

    I wish I knew how to answer this question but I believe you cannot separate your goals from your current actions. In other words, you must be mindful of all aspects of your life, not just those that come naturally. I hope to read this book!

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 7:49 am

  • Holly says:

    What a fascinating and helpful way to view money! I have learned to become more mindful of the "forty labors" that bring our food; now I will also focus on the many labors that bring our bank notes.

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 7:50 am

  • Barbara Hirschfeld says:

    I am leaving this comment in order to be chosen to get the book. Just for fun. But I read Ocean of Dharma quotes every week and treasure them, have treasured them for years. Thank you Carolyn for bringing them to us. Much love Barbara of Santa Rosa Shambhala Center CA

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 7:53 am

  • Rick Raab-Faber says:

    I keep fooling myself into thinking that money isn't important to me. And it won't be -- after I make just one more purchase...

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 7:58 am

  • Mark says:

    To me spirituality is all-encompassing, and means wholeness, so the question about whether it relates to material life is misguided. Material life is a part of the whole.

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 8:09 am

  • Diana McDonough says:

    Work, sex, and money offer us opportunities to practice mindfulness. Diana McDonough

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 8:27 am

  • Luciane says:

    I´ve bem thinking about how it´s possible integrate and live in harmony, or in other words, how can I live the life in a spiritual way, inside the dayly and comon life. These themes- work, sex and money - represent the demands of the "comon life" that has to be integrate with the spiritual dimension. It´s a challenge to me!

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 8:44 am

  • Donna Rosen says:

    This email came at the exact right moment. Every one of these things is presenting itself to me in a powerful way in my life right now. All interconnected...all in need of more mindfulness.

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 8:44 am

  • Green Key says:

    Wow, that's a lot of comments above mine. I wish I had time to read them all. Yes, of course, all aspects of life are part and parcel of the spiritual path! I'm looking forward to reading this book!

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 8:48 am

  • David Lynch says:

    Chögyam Trungpa always has a way of bringing what should be obvious to the foremost front of our minds.

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 8:51 am

  • Erika Midori Tazawa says:

    A spiritual attitude is not separated from our ordinary life as well as our soul is not separated from our body. Work, sex and money must be a natural attitude from our healthy mind.

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 8:55 am

  • Brian says:

    Money has never made me happy.
    I have had plenty and was no happier than when I had none. Although money removes some of the worries of everyday living, one will easily find a new set of worries to replace money problems.
    If one finds the middle way (relating to money) and voluntarily shares their good fortune (through charitable donations and such), then that would be a mindful relationship with money.

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 9:15 am

  • Karen Traversy says:

    I have been enjoying the quotes from the Ocean of Dharma. Thanks

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 9:29 am

  • Gin B says:

    Hey - I sure hope I win a copy of the book. it sounds like a great read!!
    Cheers,

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 9:50 am

  • karen sulak says:

    I have read a few books from this author and would like to read this book because i have been looking for spirituality in books. This one really intrigues me. The one thing i have learned from chogyam rinpoche is about mindfulness. Never have i seen one on this topic about work, sex and money. Thank you very much for allowing five people to get this book. Namaste.

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 10:05 am

  • marke says:

    Okay, slap some of that crazy wisdom this way! I could use an upgrade on my mindfulness around work, sex & money.

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 10:44 am

  • Renee Flower says:

    Love = interaction with ourselves and others
    Sex = interaction with ourselves and others
    Money = interaction with ourselves and others
    Integrated parts of the whole of life.
    Attachment and detachment.
    The individual and society.
    Approaching all aspects of our lives with mindfulness.

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 11:04 am

  • Lara Hill says:

    One of the reasons I love the quotes from Trungpa is because they are so applicable to our everyday issues, challenges, neuroses, etc. That there is a book on Work, Sex and Money only intrigues me more. I'd love to be a winner of this offer; thank you for extending the opportunity to five of us lucky practitioners!

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 11:04 am

  • Eriall says:

    Meditative/Buddhist practices most definitely can (& probably should) be utilized in developing a greater understanding and truer experience of everyday life! :) I know my practice has helped broaden my understandings of (& sanity in) the experiences of daily life, especially helping me manage my relationships more gracefully. Meditations, mantra & yogic practices have proved invaluable to my career search, growing comfortable & confident in my sexuality, my physical & emotional health, and just appreciating everything/everyone. Practice absolutely fortifies the connections between spiritual life and "normal"/everyday life.

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 11:40 am

  • Aimee says:

    Spiritual deepening relates to the here and the now. The here and now is filled with work, sex, and money.

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 12:09 pm

  • Ali says:

    My relationship with money is somewhat uncomfortable where some part of me equates having no money with purity. This is not hugely practical for me and some redirection in this area is definitely required.

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 12:17 pm

  • Ernesto says:

    The hardest thing to do is to open up the heart.

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 12:19 pm

  • Greg Price says:

    "A wonderful book " !

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 12:28 pm

  • Mira says:

    I'm interested to read some comments stating that people were no happier with money than without it. I must admit I fall into the category of imagining, though I know it is an illusion, that I'll be happier with money, that somehow life will be easier , yet I suspect that this very fantasy and my attraction to it, keeps me bound in a kind of "poverty consciousness", if that term means anything these days. i'm very aware that I need guidance in this area as I am obviously "stuck". And I know in my gut that love and sex are an integral part of the equation. I hope this book will help me. MXX

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 1:05 pm

  • Llani says:

    Thank you for offering so many wonderful books! I love work, sex, and money! Hope I win!

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 1:40 pm

  • jan wilcox says:

    I regularly contemplate the interdependence of money and stuff. All the causes and conditions that come together to bring money and stuff my direction and send money and stuff out from my direction. I love having an awareness of the flow and the lack of static-ness in money and stuff moving around. It is very delightful and a great remedy for fear of not having enough.

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 1:41 pm

  • Ruth Ritchey says:

    As my practice deepens I sometimes contemplate the life of a yogi or monastic and the fact that work, sex, and money are not 'really' a part of their life challenges. I don't wish to live this style of life necessarily but rather I look forward to studying Chogyam's teachings on these subjects because they seem to be so prominent in the layperson/householder existence.

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 1:41 pm

  • Jeff Shapiro says:

    I often think that since $ is not the most important thing in the world, it is of no importance. As I read this, I see: wrong! Or at least, that things that are not of the highest importance can also be attended to.

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 2:21 pm

  • Jean-Baptiste says:

    In reality it is all emptiness anyway.Even though I don't know what emptiness is.

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 2:35 pm

  • Patrick Hearne says:

    I've found the quotes from this book very helpful so far. Thank you for these excerpts, and I look forward to reading more!

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 3:15 pm

  • Andrew Holborn says:

    Trungpa plays in the sand and lets it tickles his toes.
    Dogen celebrates the flowers of emptiness.
    I am very grateful.

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 3:48 pm

  • Odessa says:

    The Dharma is in the daily and the repetitive, just as we know ~ with our quotidian needs: work, sex and money. Not wanting to be political, wishing to be compassionate.

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 4:27 pm

  • marion rae says:

    Thank you for the stimulus to think about my relationship to money, which is not somthing I ever consider as part of my spiritual practice...I don't contemplate it and I tend to space out and spend it unconsciously (which is not a good approach). So, I think this book may be a good one for me.

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 5:23 pm

  • Tassio knop says:

    Work, sex and money.this subject is closely related to our ego, therefore it is an excellent idea to bring mindfullness to these fields.i hope I can read the book soon!

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 5:33 pm

  • Glenn says:

    THe title of this book sounds really intrigueing.

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 7:59 pm

  • Judith Broadus says:

    Thank you, Carolyn, for sharing the treasure trove of Chogyam Trungpa's wisdom with all of us. It really does seem that passion (sex) and aggression (money) rule the world of samsara, and when seen from the perspective of things as they are, the energy of both can be liberating and a wake-up call. I still like the quote of Ray Charles (?), "I ain't in love with money, bub it shore do ease my mind." amen, bother - tell it.

    Posted on February 22, 2011 at 8:49 pm

  • Jeanne McG says:

    My relationship to money has been to devalue its worth, thinking that would put it in its theoretically proper place: low on my priorities, in deference to the spirituality that I seek to exalt. Recently I am becoming more mindful how degrading my attitude was to the world that turns by using money as a symbol of the many valuables in all our lives. I am looking at my relationship to money differently now, exercising mutual respect.

    Posted on February 23, 2011 at 2:48 am

  • Carrie says:

    Trying to teach my teens about love, sex & money. Need all the help I can get!

    Posted on February 23, 2011 at 4:18 am

  • Barb says:

    I love the mindfulness practices that are in everyday life...taking a split second to be grateful before putting a loonie in the parking meter...taking time to really smell the flowers we take into a hospital room...setting an intention for a few brief seconds before sending an e~...my life is richer for the multitude of these small moments, my mood brighter and my joy more apparent to others...

    Posted on February 23, 2011 at 4:50 am

  • sarah says:

    I am a single mom and a cancer survivor I am in a very toxic environment, I have tried everything, put together all the spiritual truths I have learned and tried to incorporate them in my life. I cannot seem to escape this negative environment, bring money into our life etc... I am at the end of my rope I have never read this book but maybe it would help.

    Posted on February 23, 2011 at 5:56 am

  • Bob Goldthwaite says:

    Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche, pound for pound, has been the most powerful teacher I've experienced, among many. My own experiece tells me that we are creatures of mind, body and spirit, and that mind and body are part of, not separate from, spirit. Therefore all things are spiritual, and anything that evokes such strong feelings as work, sex and money needs to be examined.
    Carolyn, thanks for your work as moderator- you bring the incredible wisdom of Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche to us on a daily basis.

    Posted on February 23, 2011 at 9:56 am

  • Marianne says:

    Spirituality has to do with everything in our lives! It's not something separate from the daily, the mundane.
    I would love to read this book. I've been wanting to read something by the author for some time.

    Posted on February 23, 2011 at 1:52 pm

  • alastair says:

    More brilliance from the siddha Trungpa Rinpoche....his relationship with intrinsic reality was one thing but the jewel was his ability to communicate it in a way the people understood .There are many great masters but like stars in the day time there are few that can communicate the essence of the teachings.

    Posted on February 23, 2011 at 2:51 pm

  • Stuart Bonnington says:

    Interesting ideas

    Posted on February 23, 2011 at 5:00 pm

  • Nanette J. Ford says:

    What a timely quote as I sat pondering an online purchase...I put away my credit card.

    Posted on February 23, 2011 at 5:38 pm

  • Beth Williamson says:

    Every moment of every day matters, equally. This is such a rich, spacious, and somewhat claustrophobic view. It's my understanding that this is the path Chogyam Trungpa always pointed at, it's the path of liberation. I fight it, and I deeply want it.\

    Beth W.

    Posted on February 23, 2011 at 7:00 pm

  • Alan Tilson says:

    I think this is a fabulous and very Shambhalian topic and I hope I win a book!

    Posted on February 24, 2011 at 7:50 am

  • Ginny Holden says:

    I love all these bits of wisdom that challenge my brain and give me a reason to pause and think!

    Posted on February 24, 2011 at 10:59 am

  • Rachel says:

    I do think that spirituality should be a part of our everyday tasks, but I always certain how to make that happen. I would li!ke to read this book

    Posted on February 24, 2011 at 1:35 pm

  • Vina Breyfogle says:

    Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche has always seemed to me to be practical, applying the teachings to the everyday issues we all face. This book seems to distill his many teachings to those most useful in our lives.

    Posted on February 24, 2011 at 7:43 pm

  • Sherry Kokzak says:

    Practicing Mindfulness in matters of money, sex, work, or play, has led me to contentment, appreciation, and a deeper, fuller experience. I practice mindful of all the elements that made it possible for me to buy this "thing". I have become more conscious of what I buy, trade, borrow, and I am constantly questioning the need or desire that is attached to something. Mindfulness has increased what and how I experience everyday things or events. I think that makes it essential.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 12:22 am

  • Greg Tutunjian says:

    These are definitely areas of life that benefit from a spiritual approach. Anything less can lead to disaster in one or more area.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 12:27 am

  • Wake up Boston! » Blog Archive » Money as Energy says:

    [...] Money: Real Life on the Path of Mindfulness. Winners will be randomly selected TODAY at 3PM EST. Leave a comment here to enter the [...]

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 3:04 am

  • Lee Weingrad says:

    at the point at which we relate openly to money, without the hope of it credentializing or adorning our existence, or the fear of desolation should it go away, there is no spiritual life any more, nor is there any absence of it.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 3:06 am

  • Kate says:

    The quotes are great, I'd love to win the book!

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 3:16 am

  • Randall Skipper says:

    Here is a portionof the film from youtube:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=80jGSadccmY

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 3:18 am

  • Carol says:

    I am grateful for the concept of money as energy currency.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 3:23 am

  • adrianaC says:

    work/sex/money ... all distractions!
    what is most important? BODHICITTA! with love and gratitude to Getse Rinpoche~

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 3:24 am

  • Kathleen Singh says:

    Thanks for bringing the quotes to us each week, Carolyn

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 3:35 am

  • Andy says:

    I have enjoyed Trungpa's writings for a long time. This book would be great on my shelf next to "Sacred Path of the Warrior"& "Spiritual Materialism".

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 3:44 am

  • Mary H. says:

    Spirituality is the basic element of everyday life: the nitty-gritty, the work, the sex, and the money.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 3:48 am

  • JakeLA says:

    Trungpa was so pithy. In one of his previous lives he must have been a copywriter at Chiat Day.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 3:50 am

  • Kelly says:

    I love the topic-I feel it's something I definitely need to work with. I'd love to win the book!

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 3:52 am

  • Anne says:

    In our culture we're so used to thinking of money with shame whether we have a surplus or a paucity. It's new to think of it as a workable resource and a flow of energy that in and of itself has neutrality so we can focus on our intention.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 3:54 am

  • Eliza C. Brown says:

    The book looks incredible. I can't wait to read.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 4:02 am

  • Thomas of Toronto says:

    This book looks fascinating.I am very fortunate in that I love my work.I chose to work with teens who do not fit in to the mainstream school system.
    I found my perfect work.There are plenty of ways to have a wonderful life without tons of money.The so called secret to life and fulfillment is found in giving ones abundant talents to others.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 4:20 am

  • R.W. Cox says:

    Look forward to reading this book.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 4:20 am

  • Gayle says:

    I would really like to win this book. I'm interested in learning what it has to tell me.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 4:24 am

  • Gayle says:

    I would really like to win this book. I’m interested in learning what it has to tell me.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 4:25 am

  • anne says:

    life itself is the practice, so everything is included. much gratitude for these teachings and the opportunity to comment.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 5:11 am

  • Debbi says:

    Money tangibly represents what we value. If we wish to see beyond our delusions, we can contemplate our use of money. That mindfulness will be a good Teacher.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 5:35 am

  • C. Burke says:

    Spirituality and everyday life are completely intertwined - one and the same. I suppose there are those who would consider work, sex and money as being separate, but it's all a package deal.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 5:49 am

  • kristina says:

    outrageous!

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 5:57 am

  • Michelle says:

    Spirituality absolutely is a part of daily life. It's crucial to integrate them in a way that works for both, and it's not always easy to do.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 5:57 am

  • CK Willingham says:

    It would be amazing if the world could approach those things with as little attachment as possible.....but isn't that our task at hand? I need to get this book someday

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 6:00 am

  • Alexandre Westerlund says:

    The dharma does not get more real than this does it?

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 6:02 am

  • Simon says:

    I need more awareness in these area to be real and of service a totally different level.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 6:05 am

  • Heather says:

    Work, Sex and Money.. the nitty gritty.. how could that not be a part of our spiritual practices? To divide ourselves into pieces and attempt to compartmentalize what is spiritual and what is not would be to ignore the overarching fullness of the pretty nifty and nitty gritty aspects of our lives that come together to create life. All areas of life are spiritual..even the most mundane and the most insane. I would love to read on bringing mindfullness to the nitty gritty that is living.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 6:06 am

  • Scott Reoch says:

    Well, since I don't buy paper books anymore and this won't be on Kindle until August(!), here's hoping for some luck.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 6:10 am

  • C. Patrick McIlvain says:

    Here is my comment to be included in the drawings for "Work, Sex Money" I enjoy all three - some more than others.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 6:24 am

  • Paulo Sousa says:

    It is important to differentiate and understand desires deriving from the "self", conditioned desires such as money, sex and desires springing from the "Self".

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 6:27 am

  • Deborah H says:

    viewing money spent as the energy of the moment is so right on... throughout my early life I was always noticing that much of what i bought did not seem to equal the relative value of that money in my life...glad to have worked with the Dharma and learned to manage my energy better!

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 6:37 am

  • Eric says:

    I would love to read this book and perhaps learn how to let go in the correct way...

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 7:50 am

  • Dustin Rippengale says:

    Just the other day I had the most spiritual experience handing over $400 for some handmade leather work boots that should last me 10 years.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 7:54 am

  • Camilla says:

    Love the title, and would love to read the book!

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 7:54 am

  • Lawrence Shelton says:

    Food is an important spiritual relationship also. The challenge of life is to develop a mindful relationship with food, sex and money. I haven't thought too much about work. But I am anxious to read this book because I think it will touch the heart of what is important for us here on this planet.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 7:55 am

  • penelope says:

    I have heard about the Work Sex Money recordings. Thankyou for presenting this material from CTR in book form for many people to read!

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 8:03 am

  • Patrick says:

    Money=confusion.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 8:08 am

  • Eman Fallah says:

    Much needed advice during this age of strife!

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 8:19 am

  • JJ Leatherman says:

    Would love to have the book...and am investing that energy now...

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 8:38 am

  • JJ Leatherman says:

    Would love to have the book.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 8:38 am

  • marymargaret says:

    You have my attention

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 8:51 am

  • Don C says:

    There is no distinction between the moment we spend in mediating and the moment spending money, having sex or working. Each of those moments is a pleasure to be enjoyed and to realize the fullness of live that Buddha said we all could have. The ultimate moment is to be aligned with the universe and to take that moment as if it was life itself (which it is) and to realize that in each of those moments that the universe is speaking and sharing with us. We become the universe and the universe becomes us regardless of what we are doing!

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 9:12 am

  • Matthew Lauters says:

    Finding mindfulness in every activity that you do will bring happiness to you and the world. Remember: Relax; You Are Here; Now.

    I would love a copy of this new book.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 9:13 am

  • Allison Carter says:

    When we can bring spirit into the mundane and everday aspects of our lives, we are truly living in the moment.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 9:21 am

  • keivon kianfar says:

    how does this viewpoint interact with a society based on debt?

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 9:55 am

  • Barb Cortland says:

    During these last years as a single mother I began to realize that my relationship to money has been nebulous. I have always had a certain distaste of money issues and said I would not make major decisions in my life based on it ( like who I would marry etc.) I have come to understand that this perception of money actually has created a block betwen me and this innocent energetic force. I have since "invited money to the table" and am appreciating this discussion as it helps me on this path of discovery. Thank you-Barb Cortland

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 9:57 am

  • Jennifer says:

    I love work, sex and money ... but they don't always love me;) A Kindle version would be great.
    Om Tat Sat

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 10:06 am

  • vivian brown says:

    Today's quote caused me to realize that I don't spend my money mindfully.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 10:18 am

  • David Rubin says:

    Nine years ago I was told I needed a heart transplant & Dr's were unable to give me the reason that the output of my heart was suddenly down to 7-8%. I was unable to work & told I looked too healthy to get a transplant. Work, money & love gained a new clarity. I was given a 20-30% chance to live 2-3 years. My wife had to 911 me after 3 months & I woke 10 days later to a whole new reality. I remain mindful of money, the loss of being unable to work & grateful for the love of my wife, every day vertical & finding ways to contribute.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 11:27 am

  • Jane says:

    Work, sex, money...being human. So challenging and confronting and wonderful.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 12:08 pm

  • Jenny says:

    Lot's of opportunity to contemplate this every day.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 12:10 pm

  • Liz Howell says:

    Who couldn't use a few lessons in these departments as we struggle to manage our lives in a highly materially-driven world.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 1:22 pm

  • Jade says:

    Yes, I want to know more about what CTR has said about money! Its an important issue in my life and lack of it can have very bad consequences.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 3:08 pm

  • LC says:

    i look forward to reading it.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 3:13 pm

  • Susan Chase says:

    Yes, I do believe spirituality is a companion to love, sex and money and they work together toward wholeness.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 3:43 pm

  • Katy says:

    There came a time when I realized that I had been inadvertently sabotaging my relationships by not having a"right" relationship with money and health. If I did not "get real" with the ways that I dealt with money issues and my health regimen, my partner would inevitably become anxious as my anxirty grew by the financial straits I would end up in and my lack of health and creeping weight gain. I appreciated the "wake-up call" I got by relizing that if I wanted to be in intimate relationship with another I needed to make a weekly "date" to pay attention to my own basic needs including money and food/exercise planning and strategy.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 5:22 pm

  • Jigme Datse Rasku says:

    Not really having a lot of any of these three things, maybe I'm not the best person to talk about my personal experience with them. Work, Sex, and Money seem pretty elusive to me. Maybe because I'm not being that active in seeking them out.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 5:31 pm

  • Simón says:

    I think that sex, work and money are the very basic situation that we cann't avoid if we live a secular normal life. They are the very wheel and fuel of our life, so off course ego has his root in this complete process, but if we star to broad our awareness we will definitivly change our relationship with sex, money and work in order to dispell the Lords of Materialism.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 5:44 pm

  • Pola Rest says:

    Generosity towards others also includes true generosity to ones self; it is important to have the price of a retreat i want to attend. Money is like a ripening of karma in many ways. It is energy which can be used to increase consciousness or decrease it.

    Posted on February 25, 2011 at 7:27 pm

  • T says:

    I never thought of money as energy. I think this new way of looking at it might help me immensely. I have lots of practicing to do

    Posted on February 26, 2011 at 12:30 am

  • Dennis O'Neill says:

    life is a whole, practice is just getting ready the real practice takes place off the cushion

    Posted on February 26, 2011 at 12:31 am

  • Ananda Glick says:

    I do believe that it does. How can it not? Life is a miracle! Every breath.

    Living moment to moment, and becoming present and aware is the journey... but there is not a journey, for we are aware right now! In this moment. All but is needed is to breathe and to observe and to BE present.... not to attain or to become.

    Posted on February 26, 2011 at 3:57 am

  • greg says:

    very nice

    Posted on February 26, 2011 at 4:58 am

  • Susan Ross says:

    Rinpoche - always alive and on target!

    Posted on February 26, 2011 at 6:34 am

  • Sandra Jo Harper says:

    MONEY AS ENERGY "The way we deal with money connects with a basic characteristic of our state of mind."

    The quote above spoke directly to my current situation and state of mind. Another of life's wake up moments. I look forward to reading this book.

    Posted on February 26, 2011 at 7:24 am

  • Nicolas says:

    Money, Sex, work, Trust, Energy, strivng hard to get it, easy to lose it suddenly ... Impermanence... no attachments.

    Posted on February 26, 2011 at 7:26 am

  • Paula Groves says:

    i need this teaching more than words can say. thank you for posting these exerpts.

    Posted on February 26, 2011 at 12:03 pm

  • Susan Sitzmann says:

    I believe these are all intrinsically connected.

    Posted on February 26, 2011 at 6:49 pm

  • sally mchenry says:

    The whole point of the practice of meditation and the embodiment of the dharma is to bring the clarity, spaciousness and compassion of the practice into everything that we do - into our real lives which includes work ,sex and money. I love the idea of money being a kind of energy that is connected to our state of mind. I'd never thought of the spending and aquiring of money like this before. It totally changes the stress that is usually associated with money the financial side of our lives more into sync with the spiritual part of our lives. Thank you Rinpoche

    Posted on February 26, 2011 at 7:46 pm

  • Karen says:

    These are topics of profound interest, and very much in need of dharmic filtration.

    Posted on February 27, 2011 at 8:07 am

  • lisa harris says:

    how could spirituality not include everything? if we see the world as sacred, and we are part of the world, our lives reflect our spirituality...or lack thereof. if we are encouraged to be present in every moment, that includes work, sex and money...and everything else.

    Posted on February 27, 2011 at 8:59 am

  • Zea says:

    Absolutely. These powerful aspects of our lives are our biggest opportunities to learn and live our spiritual beliefs for realization and transformation.

    Posted on February 27, 2011 at 11:19 am

  • Erica says:

    "Money represents the energy principle; you can connect with that when you’re aware of how much you're spending. Every dollar you make or spend represents your energy of the moment. The way we deal with money connects with a basic characteristic of our state of mind. We should see money in terms of the expenditure of energy and how we are going to transmute that energy into a proper use."

    In true Trungpa Rinpoche form, this quote gave me such a fresh and sharp sense of awareness of how I can be more mindful in relationship to money. I have, at times, a fairly fear based way of relating to both earning and spending- I hope this will be an illuminating way to be more "mindful with moolah".

    Posted on February 27, 2011 at 6:03 pm

  • Deborah says:

    I'm interested in reading Trungpa's view on Work, Sex, & Money; and, in the process, checking in with myself to see how it may resonate with a deeper/ recognizable Truth (or not?). So much of what I (we) know about the World is based on known-fixed-images. I wonder how it would be to directly experience each of these (work, sex, & money) in a fresh, new way. Hmmm . . . worth an experiment anyway?

    Posted on February 28, 2011 at 12:30 pm

  • Paola Mannaro says:

    As a yoga teacher, i'm looking for teachings that fit with me and also with specific students of mine. In "Work, Sex, Money" i've found the very practical sense and feel of "mindfulness" as it should be applied in "real" life situations most helpful. Thank you to Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche for this legacy of wisdom and thank you to Shambala for making it available. paola

    Posted on March 1, 2011 at 7:14 pm

  • John Miller says:

    "In the warrior's world, you are the king or queen of your domain, in your own right. This sense of celebration comes from joining the moon in your heart and the sun in your head. Elegance and dignity become natural and lovely, wholesome and good. There is no deceit and no pretense of any kind." From Smile at Fear
    A beautiful discovery of the inner divine, letting go and becoming who you are without compromise.

    Posted on March 19, 2011 at 6:08 am

  • Anita Doyle says:

    A favorite quote:

    "Quite possibly there is no such thing as spiritual practice except stepping out of self-deception., stopping our struggle to to get hold of spiritual states. Just give that up. Other than that there is no spirituality." (Myth of Freedom, p. 150)

    Thank you,Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche, for fearlessly stepping in.

    Posted on April 4, 2011 at 8:40 am

  • גינה says:

    היי ריציתי להמליץ לכם על דשא סינטטי - מוצר משובח, שמתוכנן בקפדנות ומיוצר במומחיות רבה על-מנת להיות דומה לחלוטין לדשא טבעי – לא רק במראה, אלא נוסף בתחושה . דשא סינטטי הפרוס בידי אנשי מקצוע נראה כמו דשא טבעי ומרגיש כמו דשא אמיתי לכל דבר; דשא סינטטי נראה כל כך טבעי עד שלפעמים חיות מנסות לאכול אותו! והיתרונות, הו, היתרונות...

    Posted on August 8, 2011 at 12:58 pm

  • Odessa says:

    Being mindful society we realize there is no loss and no gain, in our practice we don't be believe our minds and enter liberation.

    Posted on September 15, 2011 at 9:01 am

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    Posted on December 9, 2011 at 1:34 pm

  • Amir says:

    Yes and no. An object in moiton tends to stay in moiton. And I'm continuously learning how important it is to not make plans that include nothing going wrong stuff always comes up that must be dealt with that throws the other plans astray.

    Posted on July 11, 2012 at 4:24 am

  • Chiquita says:

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    ;) I am going to revisit once again since i have saved as a favorite it.

    Money and freedom is the greatest way to change,
    may you be rich and continue to guide other people.

    Posted on April 24, 2013 at 1:25 am

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