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Thoughts Are Not the Enemy

An Innovative Approach to Meditation Practice

SKU# 9781611800432

$16.95

Paperback

Available

Shambhala Publications | 10/14/2014
Pages: 224 | Size: 5.50 x 8.50
ISBN: 9781611800432

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Description

In most forms of meditation, the meditator is instructed to let go of thoughts as they arise. As a result, thinking is often taken, unnecessarily, to be something misguided or evil. This approach is misguided, says Jason Siff. In fact, if we allow thoughts to arise and become mindful of the thoughts themselves, we gain tranquility and insight just as in other methods without having to reject our natural mental processes. And by observing the thoughts themselves with mindfulness and curiosity, we can learn a good deal about ourselves in the process.

News & Reviews

“Jason Siff has developed Recollective Awareness meditation as a way of revealing and recounting the rich inner landscape of mental life during practice. My own clinical and reflective practice suggests that developing such recollective skills is a part of making sense of our lives and bringing peace to our inner storms.”—Daniel Siegel, author of The Mindful Brain and Brainstorm

“Siff’s book reads like a novel, but don't let the pleasure stop you. His instructions plug a common vulnerability for many meditators who get tied in knots, trying to discard thoughts as ‘distractions.’ Instead, Siff upholds the possibility of establishing a gentler, more respectful relationship with every part of our experience, learning from our thoughts and allowing calm and insight to arise naturally.”—Kate Lila Wheeler, author of When Mountains Walked and Not Where I Started From

“A respectful, intelligent, and refreshing approach to mindfulness of thinking. Rather than viewing thoughts as problems for meditation, Jason Siff describes a holistic approach to freedom through a wise exploration of thinking. For anyone who struggles with thoughts in meditation this book teaches a way out of the struggle.”—Gil Fronsdal, author of The Issue at Hand and translator of The Dhammapada

Reader Reviews