A Lecture Series on Asanga's Bodhisattvabhumi with Translator Artemus Engle

In conjunction with the Tsadra Foundation, premier translator and scholar Artemus Engle brings Asanga's masterpiece, the Bodhisattvabhumi, to life, unlocking what can be an intimidating text and making its important and power to light.

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Part 2:

Art Engle has a Ph.D. in Buddhist studies from the University of Wisconsin; adjunct professor, interpreter, and translator; active in the development of a program for teaching Buddhist classics that integrates a study of the language and their application in practice. Tsadra Foundation Grantee in 2004; Fellow since 2005.

Deeply inspired by some thirty years of devoted study with his lama, Art Engle became a translator and, remaining inspired to this day, encourages others to learn original Dharma languages, as he did. Having realized, however, that few people are going to “buy into” his urgings in this regard, he forges ahead with translations. His wish is that practitioners will have access to written teachings that can augment direct oral teachings, the latter of which, avows Art, may be “evanescent” without written material to refer to.

His extensive projects include ten years of work on lamrim texts. Currently, he is immersed in two translation projects, one of them is translating Asanga’s Bodhisattva-bhumi, which outlines the entire bodhisattava path, and the other is a translation tentatively entitled “Quarrelsome Mister Egotism: A Buddhist Fable,” a lengthy scripture presenting the Prasangika view in poetic form, with wisdom and ignorance as characters having a conversation. So dedicated are Artemus’ labors, he confesses to seldom leaving his house. Indeed, he would like to see more translations of the extensive Maitreya-Asanga literature, and feels that it is better to focus on work that has yet to be translated into Western languages, rather than provide new translations of highly popular texts for which there are already multiple translations.