Tsongkhapa

Tsongkhapa

Tsongkhapa (1357–1419), founder of the Gelug school of Tibetan Buddhism, was one of Tibet’s greatest philosophers and a prolific writer. His most famous work, The Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path, is a classic of Tibetan Buddhism.

8 Item(s)

per page

8 Item(s)

per page

ARTICLES

The Emphasis of the Gelug Tradition in Western Scholarship on Madhyamaka

While its no longer true in many universities, the presentation of Tibetan Buddhism in western academia—and the books that came out of it—was heavily skewed towards the Gelug philosophical view and its traditions. There are various reasons for this, but the following from the Translator’s...
Continue Reading >>

His Holiness the Fourteenth Dalai Lama: A Reader's Guide

DALAI LAMA TITLES Updated in April 2016 with His Holiness’ latest book, The Heart of Meditation. For this latest installment of our Great Masters series, we turn to a contemporary master, His Holiness the Fourteenth Dalai Lama, often referred to by Tibetans as Gyalwa Rinpoche...
Continue Reading >>

SNOW LION NEWSLETTER ARCHIVE

The Gelug Tradition of Breath Practice

Ge-luk presentations do not explain why the exhalation and inhalation of the breath is considered the best object of observation for “purifying” discursiveness. Simply, it works; the choice seems to be an empirical one, based on a long tradition of Buddhist practice. The governing principle...
Continue Reading >>

How Empty Is Emptiness?

One cannot become a Buddha without both compassionate action and nondual wisdom—and one cannot have these two types of paths without both of the two truths, conventional and ultimate. If only emptiness existed and there were, in fact, no conventional truths, then there would be no living...
Continue Reading >>

Running (Well) On Empty: An Interview with Guy Newland

Emptiness is perhaps the most important—yet difficult to define—topic in Buddhism. Guy Newland, author of Introduction to Emptiness—a kind of every-person’s guide to the intricacies of various explanations of emptiness—based his book on The Great Treatise on the Stages of the...
Continue Reading >>

How Empty Is Emptiness?

One cannot become a Buddha without both compassionate action and nondual wisdom—and one cannot have these two types of paths without both of the two truths, conventional and ultimate. If only emptiness existed and there were, in fact, no conventional truths, then there would be no living...
Continue Reading >>