Tsongkhapa

Tsongkhapa

Tsongkhapa (1357–1419), founder of the Gelug school of Tibetan Buddhism, was one of Tibet’s greatest philosophers and a prolific writer. His most famous work, The Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path, is a classic of Tibetan Buddhism.

Tsongkhapa

Tsongkhapa (1357–1419), founder of the Gelug school of Tibetan Buddhism, was one of Tibet’s greatest philosophers and a prolific writer. His most famous work, The Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path, is a classic of Tibetan Buddhism.

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GUIDES

The Role of the Teacher in Tibetan Buddhism: A Reader's Guide to the Teacher-Student Relationship

The Teacher-Student Relationship Learn More To truly understand Tibetan Buddhism, one must come to grips with the unique role of the teacher, the dynamics of the teacher-student relationship, and the possibilities that having a teacher can open...
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The Importance of the Ornament of Mahayana Sutras

One of the Five Maitreya Treatises—the five texts imparted to Asanga by the bodhisattva Maitreya—the Ornament of the Mahayana Sutras (in Sankrit the Mahayanasutralamkara, often shortened to Sutralamkara) presents explanations of bodhisattva motivation, meditation, conduct, and fruition...
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Tsongkhapa: A Guide to His Life and Works

See More: Lives of the Masters Series | Atisha | Rangjung Dorje | Aryadeva | Jamgon Kongtrul | Jigme Lingpa | Patrul Rinpoche | Mipham Rinpoche The Life of Tsongkhapa Lobsang Drakpa (1357-1419) Tsongkhapa Lobzang Drakpa (1357–1419), was one...
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The Life of Tsongkhapa

Tsongkhapa was born in 1357 in the Tsongkha valley of Amdo province in northeast Tibet. The miraculous events that occurred at his birth aroused the interest of the master Chöje Döndrup Rinchen (Chos rje Don grub rin chen), who had studied and lived in central Tibet and who founded two monasteries...
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SNOW LION NEWSLETTER ARCHIVE

The Dalai Lama: Reliance on a Teacher

This article on reliance on a teacher originally appeared in the Snow Lion newsletter, Vol 12 #4, Fall 1997 Answers to Questions at the Tibetan Buddhist Learning Center, Washington, New Jersey, September 1990 Joshua Cutler: Americans in general are very wary of relying on one...
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The Gelug Tradition of Breath Practice

Geluk presentations do not explain why the exhalation and inhalation of the breath is considered the best object of observation for “purifying” discursiveness. Simply, it works; the choice seems to be an empirical one, based on a long tradition of Buddhist practice. The governing principle...
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How Empty Is Emptiness?

One cannot become a Buddha without both compassionate action and nondual wisdom—and one cannot have these two types of paths without both of the two truths, conventional and ultimate. If only emptiness existed and there were, in fact, no conventional truths, then there would be no living...
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Running (Well) On Empty: An Interview with Guy Newland

Emptiness is perhaps the most important—yet difficult to define—topic in Buddhism. Guy Newland, author of Introduction to Emptiness—a kind of every-person’s guide to the intricacies of various explanations of emptiness—based his book on The Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path:...
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